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193707 [2015/05/22 03:49]
emmanuelle_c [BONUM PIC AND TRAVIS PASS.]
193707 [2015/06/16 03:06] (current)
emmanuelle_c [Myles Dunphy]
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 |Sales Manager:| W.J. Mullins.| |Sales Manager:| W.J. Mullins.|
  
-===== CONTENTS =====+===== Contents =====
    
 ^ ^ ^  Page  ^ ^ ^ ^  Page  ^
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 |Publications Received| |21| |Publications Received| |21|
  
-===== EDITORIAL =====+===== Editorial =====
  
 No editorial committee has as yet been appointed by the Committee, but the editor wishes to thank Misses Dinah Hearfield and Kath Mackay for their valuable assistance in the editing of this issue. No editorial committee has as yet been appointed by the Committee, but the editor wishes to thank Misses Dinah Hearfield and Kath Mackay for their valuable assistance in the editing of this issue.
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 In this number for the first time we publish a letter received concerning a matter of Club-controversy. "The Sydney Bushwalker" is yours and is always open for the free discussion of any matter of Club-interest. We hope that those of you who have theories to ventilate, or constructive criticism to offer, will follow Tom Herbert's example and write to the editor about the matter. Such letters will be given precedence over ordinary articles if space is short. In this number for the first time we publish a letter received concerning a matter of Club-controversy. "The Sydney Bushwalker" is yours and is always open for the free discussion of any matter of Club-interest. We hope that those of you who have theories to ventilate, or constructive criticism to offer, will follow Tom Herbert's example and write to the editor about the matter. Such letters will be given precedence over ordinary articles if space is short.
  
-===== ANZAC WEEK-END MEETING OF THE TI WILLA PICNIC RACE CLUB. =====+===== Anzac Week-End Meeting of the Ti Willa Picnic Race Club. =====
  
 __THE CLOUDMAKER STAKES:__ (For an anonymous cheque for 10 presented by a gentleman with a carpet snake). __THE CLOUDMAKER STAKES:__ (For an anonymous cheque for 10 presented by a gentleman with a carpet snake).
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 At 2.10 a.m. being somewhat __conscientious__ we entered a 2nd. class carriage but B.O. reigning high we hastily retreated and dived into an unlighted "First" The lone occupant, a Scot, __gave__ us welcome __and__ a bottle of stout. Bath, breakfast, and so to work! At 2.10 a.m. being somewhat __conscientious__ we entered a 2nd. class carriage but B.O. reigning high we hastily retreated and dived into an unlighted "First" The lone occupant, a Scot, __gave__ us welcome __and__ a bottle of stout. Bath, breakfast, and so to work!
  
-===== "THE INCOMPATIBLES" =====+===== "The Incompatibles" =====
  
 Rain! RAIN! R A I N!!! The drizzling, driving dampener of spirits. But not of the Incompatibles - that, dear reader, was the start of our epic Anzac week-end grind care of Gordon Smith and Max Gentle - from Wentworth Falls to Katoomba. Hast ever (x)RUN with Gordon & Co.? No? You should try it. When your feet ache; you are weak and dizzy for want of food; when every fibre of your being cries stop! The Incompatibles say WALK!! And then, like those immortal heroes: "theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do or die" you struggle feebly on. Rain! RAIN! R A I N!!! The drizzling, driving dampener of spirits. But not of the Incompatibles - that, dear reader, was the start of our epic Anzac week-end grind care of Gordon Smith and Max Gentle - from Wentworth Falls to Katoomba. Hast ever (x)RUN with Gordon & Co.? No? You should try it. When your feet ache; you are weak and dizzy for want of food; when every fibre of your being cries stop! The Incompatibles say WALK!! And then, like those immortal heroes: "theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do or die" you struggle feebly on.
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 A story of effort and achievement, - and a journey well fulfilled. A story of effort and achievement, - and a journey well fulfilled.
  
-===== CORRESPONDENCE ===== +===== Correspondence ===== 
-==== ARE WE HUMBUGS? ==== +==== Are we Humbugs? ==== 
-=== PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS AND COCK-EYED OFFICIALDOM. ===+=== Prospective Members and Cock-Eyed Officialdom. ===
  
 Dear Editor - How we sweated over the building up of our Club's Constitution! Dear Editor - How we sweated over the building up of our Club's Constitution!
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 Sincerely yours, Sincerely yours,
  
-TOM HERBERT.+Tom Herbert.
  
 Now hollow fires burn out to black,\\ Now hollow fires burn out to black,\\
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 A.E. Housman. A.E. Housman.
  
-===== "FOR THE VERY YOUNG" =====+===== "For the Very Young" =====
  
 By Evelyn Millard By Evelyn Millard
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 After a rest, the KNIGHT set forth for home, and the very next day, feeling a new man, set out for the COX, on the banks of which dwelt the maiden and her uncle. He set out for CLEAR HILL, and went down the ladder of one TARO, finally arriving at his destination, where, after a short battle with the wicked uncle, he won the heart of the maiden. They were married a few days later by a CLARKE of the peace who was camping near by, and after a trip to SCOTLAND arid back for the honeymoon, they settled down in a tumble-down shack, where they had to PIGGOTT for a while. Then they moved to one of the pretty HOLMES at GORDON, where they lived happily ever after. After a rest, the KNIGHT set forth for home, and the very next day, feeling a new man, set out for the COX, on the banks of which dwelt the maiden and her uncle. He set out for CLEAR HILL, and went down the ladder of one TARO, finally arriving at his destination, where, after a short battle with the wicked uncle, he won the heart of the maiden. They were married a few days later by a CLARKE of the peace who was camping near by, and after a trip to SCOTLAND arid back for the honeymoon, they settled down in a tumble-down shack, where they had to PIGGOTT for a while. Then they moved to one of the pretty HOLMES at GORDON, where they lived happily ever after.
  
-===== THE VALLEY OF THE SWAMPY PLAIN. =====+===== The Valley of the Swampy Plain. =====
  
 By Jim Muir, Coolemon. By Jim Muir, Coolemon.
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 The Motorist ran into a live wife, which blew the lights of his car ... and then ... he sped away! The Motorist ran into a live wife, which blew the lights of his car ... and then ... he sped away!
  
-=== HOW LONG SINCE YOU VISITED PADDY'S? ===+=== How Long Since You Visited Paddy's? ===
  
 It is a good plan to have a look around Paddy's place\\ It is a good plan to have a look around Paddy's place\\
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 __SYDNEY.__ __SYDNEY.__
  
-===== CLUB WALKS =====+===== Club Walks =====
  
 By Flo Allsmorth. By Flo Allsmorth.
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 A.E. (George Russell) A.E. (George Russell)
  
-===== BUNGONIA =====+===== Bungonia =====
  
 By Gwen Clarke.  By Gwen Clarke. 
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 Or are they paddy-melons? ED. Or are they paddy-melons? ED.
  
-===== FEDERATION NEWS. =====+===== Federation News. =====
  
 __The Search and Rescue Section__ has issued a comprehensive report and scheme of action. All who are able should fill up the forms, which our secretary will provide, specifying just what they are prepared to do if the call comes for help. __The Search and Rescue Section__ has issued a comprehensive report and scheme of action. All who are able should fill up the forms, which our secretary will provide, specifying just what they are prepared to do if the call comes for help.
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 The Federation is still pressing for the reservation of __Garawarra Park__ as originally intended and opposing the extension of Lady Carrington Drive to Otford. The Federation is still pressing for the reservation of __Garawarra Park__ as originally intended and opposing the extension of Lady Carrington Drive to Otford.
  
-===== HOW PEOPLE WALK IN OTHER LANDS OR MORE NEWS OF NEW YORK'S HIKING CLUBS =====+===== How People Walk in Other Lands or More News of New York's Hiking Clubs =====
  
-FROM SUZANNE REICHARD+From Suzanne Reichard
  
 Mr. Dench has further acted tile fairy godfather to the extent of securing invitations for me to go out with all the important hiking clubs around New York, with the exception of the Apalachian Mountain Club, which was too snooty even to reply to his letter. He really is a splendid man. Mr. Dench has further acted tile fairy godfather to the extent of securing invitations for me to go out with all the important hiking clubs around New York, with the exception of the Apalachian Mountain Club, which was too snooty even to reply to his letter. He really is a splendid man.
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 After having been out with quite a number of American clubs I must say that my respect for the S.B.W. has increased mightily. There is no club here that can compare with them for toughness, pioneering spirit, arid ability to rough it; for here, with made trails and trail shelters everywhere such qualities are not require. The American clubs lack, too, the informality of the S.B.W., and the real mateship that comes from hardships bravely shared. Members, who have been in the same club for years will continue to call one another Mr. and Miss. Of course you must bare in mind that these are generalizations based on rather superficial observations and I have no doubt that, on increased acquaintance, I would find that there were many really fine people in the clubs. After having been out with quite a number of American clubs I must say that my respect for the S.B.W. has increased mightily. There is no club here that can compare with them for toughness, pioneering spirit, arid ability to rough it; for here, with made trails and trail shelters everywhere such qualities are not require. The American clubs lack, too, the informality of the S.B.W., and the real mateship that comes from hardships bravely shared. Members, who have been in the same club for years will continue to call one another Mr. and Miss. Of course you must bare in mind that these are generalizations based on rather superficial observations and I have no doubt that, on increased acquaintance, I would find that there were many really fine people in the clubs.
  
-===== TRAMPING IN NEW ZEALAND BUSH WALKING IN AUSTRALIA. =====+===== Tramping in New Zealand Bush Walking in Australia. =====
  
 __Norma Cooper.__ __Norma Cooper.__
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 The differences between the two Clubs are only minor after all and the essentials - love of the open air and good fellowship - are the same. The differences between the two Clubs are only minor after all and the essentials - love of the open air and good fellowship - are the same.
  
-==== TIPS FOR TYROS ==== +==== Tips for Tyros ==== 
-==== WINKLES FOR WALKERS====+==== Winkles for Walkers====
  
 On exploratory trips it is better to go down rivers and up ridges. They converge that way. On exploratory trips it is better to go down rivers and up ridges. They converge that way.
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 Don't waste hours rolling your sleeping bag for packing, push it into the cover in a couple of minutes. Don't waste hours rolling your sleeping bag for packing, push it into the cover in a couple of minutes.
  
-===== BONUM PIC AND TRAVIS PASS. =====+===== Bonum Pic and Travis Pass. =====
  
 __By Alec Colley.__ __By Alec Colley.__
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 From the point where we first arrived at the top of the mountain we had no difficulty in getting down the other side. For about half the way we followed a dry gully and when this became rough we climbed up onto a ridge and followed this down to the river. This route from the Upper Burragorang to the Nattai is probably the only way of getting from one to the other without following down to the junction of the two rivers, and makes possible quite a number of interesting walks. From the point where we first arrived at the top of the mountain we had no difficulty in getting down the other side. For about half the way we followed a dry gully and when this became rough we climbed up onto a ridge and followed this down to the river. This route from the Upper Burragorang to the Nattai is probably the only way of getting from one to the other without following down to the junction of the two rivers, and makes possible quite a number of interesting walks.
  
-==== THE ROCK.CLIMBING SECTION ====+==== The Rock-Climbing Section ====
  
-June 1937 saw the advent of the RockClidbing Section of the Sydney Bush Walkers, the moving spirits being Dot English, our star:solidber, Gordon Smith, Bill McKosker, David Stead and Frazer Radcliffe (from N.Z.). Having seen rook- climbing abroad, we have no doubt that these people would take their place at the forefront of any rock.:iclidbing club elsewhere Their methods being self-taught are shockingly unorthodox, and we are not certain that they even know haw to tie the ordinary knots, but they take very good care that the knots they do tie take +June 1937 saw the advent of the Rock-Climbing Section of the Sydney Bush Walkers, the moving spirits being Dot English, our star-climber, Gordon Smith, Bill McKosker, David Stead and Frazer Radcliffe (from N.Z.). Having seen rock-climbing abroad, we have no doubt that these people would take their place at the forefront of any rock-climbing club elsewhereTheir methods being self-taught are shockingly unorthodox, and we are not certain that they even know how to tie the ordinary knots, but they take very good care that the knots they do tie take a lot of untying, but this is fortunately not often necessary, because they do not use the rope except in places which ordinary people would regard as impossible even with it. We wish them good luck and hope they will always hold the record of a rock-climbing club which never has accidents. 
-a lot of untying, but this is fortunately not often necessary, because they do not use the rope except in places which ordinary people mould regard as impossible even with it. We wish them good luck and hope they will always hold the record of a rock-climbing club which never has accidents.+==== Myles Dunphy ====
  
-==== MYLES DUNPHY ====+It was a happy thought which inspired Charlie Pride when he suggested breaking the usual rule about a prophet not being without honour except among his own people, and arranged that we should do honour to Myles Dunphy, the father of the bushwalking movement in N.S.W. and one who has done more for its interests than any other person. A suitable presentation was arranged and speakers paid tribute to the work of the person whom we all acknowledge to be the only one indispensable to the work for the reservation of national parks and primitive areas. May he be long with us to carry that work forward.
  
-It was a happy thought which inspired Charlie Pride when he suggested breaking the usual rule about a prophet not being without honour except among +===== "Redgum" =====
-his own people, aad arranged that we should do honour to Myles Dunphy, the father of the bushwaiking movement in N.S.W. and one who has done more for its interests than any other person. A suitable presentation was arranged and speakers paid tribute to the work of the person whom we all acknowledge to be the only one indispensable to the work for the reservation of national parks and primitive areas. May he be long with UA to carry that work forward.+
  
-===== "REDGUM" =====+A Tribute
  
-A Tribute By "Bushwalker"+By "Bushwalker" 
 + 
 +Mr. J.G. Lockley has passed on.
  
-Mr. J.G. LockIey has passed on. 
 His monument is what he achieved. It is unnecessary here to expound upon his achievements, they are so well known, and although we shall be the poorer by his loss, we are the richer for the legacy he has left us. His monument is what he achieved. It is unnecessary here to expound upon his achievements, they are so well known, and although we shall be the poorer by his loss, we are the richer for the legacy he has left us.
-It would seem, however, that the official Journal of The Sydney Bush Walkers, which club was honoured by Redgumts membership, is a fit place to express how-we of the Bushwalking fraternity esteemed and loved this man, not only for what he was, a lovable and beloved character, but for what he did.+ 
 +It would seem, however, that the official Journal of The Sydney Bush Walkers, which club was honoured by Redgum'membership, is a fit place to express how we of the Bushwalking fraternity esteemed and loved this man, not only for what he was, a lovable and beloved character, but for what he did. 
 Always an exponent of the trees, the out-of-doors and the ideals for which all bushlovers strive, he never failed in an appeal for assistance, even though it entailed sheer physical labour. Always an exponent of the trees, the out-of-doors and the ideals for which all bushlovers strive, he never failed in an appeal for assistance, even though it entailed sheer physical labour.
-Never shall I forget what a privilege it was to accompany him among that small party Some few years ago which descended into the Grose Valley to inspect the proposed reservation for posterity of what is now The Blue Gum Forest. His admiration for everything about him! His explanation and naming of the multiplicity of the floral How he thrilled to the beauty and the majesty of the trees. How he prophesied "This must and shall be reserved for future generations!" And chiefly through his able penmanship and the courtesy of "The Sydney Morning Herald" such prophecy was fortunately fulfilled. 
-No mean accomplishment this, for a man almost 70 years of age to descend 2,000 feet by a rough bridle track and after inspecting 40 acres of virgin forest land to ascend via the precipitous Govettts Leap to Blackheath, then to drive his ear to Sydney. But Mr. Lockley was uncomplaining, his sole desire being to help in the preservation of some more of his beloved trees. 
-It was an inspiration to all of us and with our association with him in other ways served to bring Bushwalkers to love this man as I feel sure he loved 
-US 
  
-Among the memorials to perpetuate his name is one, and of which I think he was proudest, the Lockley Pylon, a rugged outcrop of sandstone near Mount Hay overlooking the Gavettts Leap Valley and The Blue Gum Forest. +Never shall I forget what a privilege it was to accompany him among that small party some few years ago which descended into the Grose Valley to inspect the proposed reservation for posterity of what is now The Blue Gum Forest. His admiration for everything about him! His explanation and naming of the multiplicity of the flora! How he thrilled to the beauty and the majesty of the trees. How he prophesied - "This must and shall be reserved for future generations!" And chiefly through his able penmanship and the courtesy of "The Sydney Morning Herald" such prophecy was fortunately fulfilled. 
-Nhen speaking with him of the accomplishments of himself and others his reply would almost invariably be "Well, I've done little, but the others havenst a pylon!" + 
-We are the pilgrims, master; we shall go Always a little further; it may be +No mean accomplishment this, for a man almost 70 years of age to descend 2,000 feet by a rough bridle track and after inspecting 40 acres of virgin forest land to ascend via the precipitous Govett's Leap to Blackheath, then to drive his car to Sydney. But Mr. Lockley was uncomplaining, his sole desire being to help in the preservation of some more of his beloved trees. 
-Beyond that last blue mountain barred with snow Across that angry or that glimmering sea.+ 
 +It was an inspiration to all of us and with our association with him in other ways served to bring Bushwalkers to love this man as I feel sure he loved us. 
 + 
 +Among the memorials to perpetuate his name is one, and of which I think he was proudest, the Lockley Pylon, a rugged outcrop of sandstone near Mount Hay overlooking the Govett'Leap Valley and The Blue Gum Forest. 
 + 
 +When speaking with him of the accomplishments of himself and others his reply would almost invariably be "Well, I've done little, but the others haven'a pylon!" 
 + 
 +We are the pilgrims, master; we shall go\\ 
 +Always a little further; it may be \\ 
 +Beyond that last blue mountain barred with snow \\ 
 +Across that angry or that glimmering sea.\\
 J.E. Flecker. J.E. Flecker.
  
-===== BUSHLAND MEMORIES. =====+===== Bushland Memories. =====
  
-I long to sing the songs I heard The lilting songs of leaf and bird Andwater falling: +I long to sing the songs I heard\\ 
-Of laughing rivers gliding by, Beneath the wide Australian sky, And macpies calling; +The lilting songs of leaf and bird \\ 
-Of beauty that I cannot tell, +And water falling:\\ 
-Of moss and fern and quiet dell And sunbeams glancing +Of laughing rivers gliding by, \\ 
-O'er lonely, tree-fringed waterways, Of magic dawns and. blue gold days And fairies dancing; +Beneath the wide Australian sky,\\ 
-Of bush and valley, hill and plain, The smell of gum leaves after rain, A curlew crying +And magpies calling;
-When dbon night OOMBS swiftly dawn +
-And drifting mists enshroud the town, The west wind sighing; +
-Of forest splendour far unrolled, Of leafy spires, the living gold Of wattles growing +
-In valley depths and wild things shy Where lone peaks lean against the sky, With brave winds blowing. +
-At times I pause and fain would speak Of windless vale and winding creek, And often in the wind and rain I hear those wordless songs again - I watch the black swan streaming by, See camel teams against the sky, As o'er the hills there come to no The songs that I, enchanted, heard, Soft cadences of leaf and birds The wonder and the witchery +
-Of earth and air and moving sea I hear them in the golden noon And oft beneath a great white moon My soul is filled with rapt delight As bushland memories flood the night. +
-7t,+
  
-WALTER D. WHITE.\\ +Of beauty that I cannot tell,\\ 
-Sydney Morning Herald.\\+Of moss and fern and quiet dell \\ 
 +And sunbeams glancing\\ 
 +O'er lonely, tree-fringed waterways, \\ 
 +Of magic dawns and blue gold days \\ 
 +And fairies dancing; 
 + 
 +Of bush and valley, hill and plain, \\ 
 +The smell of gum leaves after rain, \\ 
 +A curlew crying\\ 
 +When ebon night comes swiftly down \\ 
 +And drifting mists enshroud the town, \\ 
 +The west wind sighing; 
 + 
 +Of forest splendour far unrolled, \\ 
 +Of leafy spires, the living gold \\ 
 +Of wattles growing \\ 
 +In valley depths and wild things shy \\ 
 +Where lone peaks lean against the sky, \\ 
 +With brave winds blowing. 
 + 
 +At times I pause and fain would speak \\ 
 +Of windless vale and winding creek, \\ 
 +And often in the wind and rain \\ 
 +I hear those wordless songs again. \\ 
 +I watch the black swan streaming by, \\ 
 +See camel teams against the sky, \\ 
 +As o'er the hills there come to me \\ 
 +The songs that I, enchanted, heard, \\ 
 +Soft cadences of leaf and birds \\ 
 +The wonder and the witchery \\ 
 +Of earth and air and moving sea. \\ 
 +I hear them in the golden noon \\ 
 +And oft beneath a great white moon \\ 
 +My soul is filled with rapt delight \\ 
 +As bushland memories flood the night. 
 + 
 + 
 +__Walter D. White.__\\ 
 +__Sydney Morning Herald.__\\
 20/3/37. 20/3/37.
  
-===== PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED =====+===== Publications Received ===== 
 + 
 +The Club has recently been made wealthier by the addition to the library of the following publications: 
 + 
 +__The New Zealand Alpine Journal__ - This is the annual publication of the New Zealand Alpine Club, beautifully got-up, well illustrated and interestingly written, the sort of publication that perhaps one day a Bushwalker Annual may aspire to be. It gives an account of New Zealand exploration and mountaineering during the past year, and those who intend to go over there this year will be glad to study it carefully. 
 + 
 +__The Conquest of Mount Cook by Freda Du Faur__ - This has been presented to the Club by the author's executrix. It is the classic of New Zealand mountaineering and is written in a manner which holds the attention from cover to cover. The author was a Sydney girl, and perhaps after reading of her exploits some of our members will feel inspired to emulate her example. 
 + 
 +__Australian Encyclopaedia__ -  We are indebted to Ted Dollimore for this very handsome and useful gift. It is too well known to need comment, and we can only thank the donor very sincerely for a book which would make any library envious. 
 + 
 +The following have been handed to the editor just before going to press, so that there is no time to review them. They also will be added to the library:
  
-The Club has recently been made wealthier by the addition to the library of the following publications:- 
-TheNew Zealand no Journal- - This is the annual publication of the New Zealand Alpine Club, beautifully got-up, well illustrated and interestingly written, the sort of publication that perhaps one day a Bushwalker Annual may aspire to be. It gives an account of New Zealand exploration and mountaineering during the past year, and those who intend to go over there this year will be glad to study it carefully. 
-The Conquest of Mount Cook by Freda Du Faur - This has been presented to the Club by the author's executrix. It is the classic of New Zealand mountaineering and is written in a manner which holds the attention from cover to cover. The author was a Sydney girl, and perhaps after reading of her exploits some of our members will feel inspired to emulate her example. 
-Australian Encyclopedia We are indebted to Ted Dollimore for this very handaame and useful gift. It is too well known to need comment, and we can only thank the donor very sincerely for a book which would make any library envious. 
-The following have been handed to the editor just before going to press, so that there is no time to review them. They also will be added to the library:- 
 The Rambler's Handbook 1937. The Rambler's Handbook 1937.
 +
 The Tararua Tramper, April, May and June 1937. The Tararua Tramper, April, May and June 1937.
 +
 Bulletin of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, January and October 1936. January and April 1937. Bulletin of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, January and October 1936. January and April 1937.
 +
 The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club and its Trails. The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club and its Trails.
-The Appalachian Trail in Pennsylvania's South Mountain by Myron H. Avery. List of Camping, Hiking and Trail...Making Equipment 1935.+ 
 +The Appalachian Trail in Pennsylvania's South Mountain by Myron H. Avery.  
 + 
 +List of Camping, Hiking and Trail Making Equipment 1935. 
 Songs of Canadian Climbers - presented by Eileen Desbrisay of the Alpine Club of Canada. Songs of Canadian Climbers - presented by Eileen Desbrisay of the Alpine Club of Canada.
-Into the Blue Journal of the Coast and Mountain Walkers.+ 
 +Into the Blue Journal of the Coast and Mountain Walkers. 
 The Tree Book by David G. Stead. The Tree Book by David G. Stead.
 +
 Giants and. Pigmies of the Deep by David G. Stead. Giants and. Pigmies of the Deep by David G. Stead.
 +
 The Rabbit in Australia by David G. Stead. The Rabbit in Australia by David G. Stead.
-Journal of the RuoLSao Tramping.01Vb of N.Z. January, February mud March 1937.+ 
 +Journal of the Ruc-Sac Tramping Club of N.Z. January, February and March 1937.
  
193707.1432266546.txt.gz · Last modified: 2015/05/22 03:49 by emmanuelle_c