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194409 [2016/03/21 22:09]
vievems
194409 [2017/11/08 12:42]
tyreless
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 |Federation Notes||12| |Federation Notes||12|
  
 +----
  
 ==== Native Poet ==== ==== Native Poet ====
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 But, "Give me a crimdon bird to chatter\\ Bush-silence with his parrot-clatter,\\ Black of wattle-bird, cockatoo-screech\\ Echoing along the reach",\\ Sings the magpie, "Woods and dales\\ Are proper haunts for nightingale;\\ But here, by claypan flat and creak\\ And gully, native voices speak." But, "Give me a crimdon bird to chatter\\ Bush-silence with his parrot-clatter,\\ Black of wattle-bird, cockatoo-screech\\ Echoing along the reach",\\ Sings the magpie, "Woods and dales\\ Are proper haunts for nightingale;\\ But here, by claypan flat and creak\\ And gully, native voices speak."
  
 +----
  
 ==== Bushwalking Babies ==== ==== Bushwalking Babies ====
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 When I look back on the highlights of my childhood, I feel very sorry for the boys and girls who do not have parents to take them bushwalking, and if fitness camps and youth hostels can be foster parents to such children, then as bushwalkers we should be foster parents to the fitness camps and youth hostels. When I look back on the highlights of my childhood, I feel very sorry for the boys and girls who do not have parents to take them bushwalking, and if fitness camps and youth hostels can be foster parents to such children, then as bushwalkers we should be foster parents to the fitness camps and youth hostels.
 +
 +----
  
 ==== Why do we walk? ==== ==== Why do we walk? ====
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 Some of us will tell you that we walk to see the country. But how little of it we really do see when out walking.   Very often our eyes are glued to the ground immediately ahead of our feet, carefully watching each step in case we should fall over in our struggle some, heavily weighted movements over the countryside.  Certainly we stop now and again when the leader gets puffed out and says the view is worth looking at; but if we'd been riding a horse, or a cycle; or merely sitting at home in an armchair looking at an illustrated Tourist Bureau pamphlet, we probably would have seen much more of the view without half the bother! Some of us will tell you that we walk to see the country. But how little of it we really do see when out walking.   Very often our eyes are glued to the ground immediately ahead of our feet, carefully watching each step in case we should fall over in our struggle some, heavily weighted movements over the countryside.  Certainly we stop now and again when the leader gets puffed out and says the view is worth looking at; but if we'd been riding a horse, or a cycle; or merely sitting at home in an armchair looking at an illustrated Tourist Bureau pamphlet, we probably would have seen much more of the view without half the bother!
- 
  
 A few of us think we walk for the enjoyable companionship. Admittedly we seem happy enough to be out together; but what about those wives, and sweethearts, and mothers, and maiden aunts of ours, who sit at home knitting our pom pom caps, and socks; and wondering all the while when we'll get sense enough to find out that their company can be even more enjoyable than our own. No sir! It's not the companionship which attracts us - it's the lack of it more likely. A few of us think we walk for the enjoyable companionship. Admittedly we seem happy enough to be out together; but what about those wives, and sweethearts, and mothers, and maiden aunts of ours, who sit at home knitting our pom pom caps, and socks; and wondering all the while when we'll get sense enough to find out that their company can be even more enjoyable than our own. No sir! It's not the companionship which attracts us - it's the lack of it more likely.
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 No sir! I cannot tell you why we walk - I'm sure none of us can; but please don't delay me any longer.  I'm in a devil of a hurry.  I want to get home to pack my rueksack for the weekend walk.  I wouldn't miss it for the No sir! I cannot tell you why we walk - I'm sure none of us can; but please don't delay me any longer.  I'm in a devil of a hurry.  I want to get home to pack my rueksack for the weekend walk.  I wouldn't miss it for the
 world! world!
 +
 +----
  
 ==== Did this happen to you? ==== ==== Did this happen to you? ====
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 Illustration by Les Harpur Illustration by Les Harpur
  
 +----
  
 ==== Sale of Native Flowers ==== ==== Sale of Native Flowers ====
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 With this in mind we wrote to the leading stores which sell wild flowers and asked if they would be public spirited and stop the sale of same in their stores.  Two of them responded, Messrs Woolworths said they would stop the sale altogether and their Managing Director and Secretary signed the petition, and Messrs. Anthony Hordern said they would stop the sale for the time being.  It is now up to all bushwalkers to go out of their way to shop at these stores and tell the sales assistant why they are doing so. With this in mind we wrote to the leading stores which sell wild flowers and asked if they would be public spirited and stop the sale of same in their stores.  Two of them responded, Messrs Woolworths said they would stop the sale altogether and their Managing Director and Secretary signed the petition, and Messrs. Anthony Hordern said they would stop the sale for the time being.  It is now up to all bushwalkers to go out of their way to shop at these stores and tell the sales assistant why they are doing so.
 +
 +----
  
 ==== Books for the Services ==== ==== Books for the Services ====
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 Bring what you can into the Club, or leave with PADDY PALLIN. Bring what you can into the Club, or leave with PADDY PALLIN.
  
 +----
  
 ==== Gossip ==== ==== Gossip ====
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 Tuggie has done her last Test walk.  She says Paddy led her first test walk and now he has led her last.  On this, her last test walk, Tuggie complained bitterly that she had always thought that T & R on the programme meant Track and Reasonable.  To which Paddy smartly retorted that No, it meant Tuff and Ruff. Tuggie has done her last Test walk.  She says Paddy led her first test walk and now he has led her last.  On this, her last test walk, Tuggie complained bitterly that she had always thought that T & R on the programme meant Track and Reasonable.  To which Paddy smartly retorted that No, it meant Tuff and Ruff.
 +
 +----
  
 ==== October Walks ==== ==== October Walks ====
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 |The walk this week-end to the Wild Dog Mountains has been cancelled, so everyone should be available to go to our Annual Federation Re-Union; there to meet our friends from other clubs, and so foster the inter-club spirit. The site and other particulars will be made known as soon as they have been decided.  Are you coming?|| |The walk this week-end to the Wild Dog Mountains has been cancelled, so everyone should be available to go to our Annual Federation Re-Union; there to meet our friends from other clubs, and so foster the inter-club spirit. The site and other particulars will be made known as soon as they have been decided.  Are you coming?||
  
 +----
  
 ==== The Walker's Bleat ==== ==== The Walker's Bleat ====
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 You hear it not while at your work,\\ Now in the busy street;\\ But when the walkers rove about\\  You hear it not while at your work,\\ Now in the busy street;\\ But when the walkers rove about\\ 
 There comes a plaintive bleat,\\ The careful leader stalks ahead\\ In rain and summers heat,\\ And little heeds the anguished souls\\ Who cry: "When do we eat?"\\ Oh, many of our walking friends\\ Thus hunger on their feet,\\ And know that ease for it depends\\ on This "WHEN DO WE EAT"? There comes a plaintive bleat,\\ The careful leader stalks ahead\\ In rain and summers heat,\\ And little heeds the anguished souls\\ Who cry: "When do we eat?"\\ Oh, many of our walking friends\\ Thus hunger on their feet,\\ And know that ease for it depends\\ on This "WHEN DO WE EAT"?
 +
 +----
  
 ==== Letters from the Lads ==== ==== Letters from the Lads ====
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 |Gordon Mannell|Bill Burke| |Gordon Mannell|Bill Burke|
  
 +__Doris Allden - 12/6/44__
 +
 +Last Friday week I ended up in Sick Bay with dengue and have been in since.  It's an unpleasant affair and we have had a lot of it here.  I thought I was escaping but it seems that conceit does not pay after all.  I appear to have lost considerable weight judging by my dressing gown which hangs in folds.  However, the consolation prize for all this is a week's convalescence on the Island.  I hope to go across on Wednesday and if the weather holds expect some sun baking.
 +
 +Our Sick Bay is quite new so I expect there is no harm in sampling it.  When I became well enough to appreciate it.  I decided it really was pleasant with its egg shell blue walls, cream ceiling and blue bed covers, and the most charming of all Naval Nursing Sisters to go with it.  All this sounds as if I might be better.  Add to the above, a clear view right across to the Island.  A nice place to rest with a sore knee or a headache but no! not dengue.
 +
 +Apart from this little episode life has been proceeding interestingly and enjoyably.  Still have much to learn of Naval ways and customs.  Work is extremely interesting and I do regret these wasted weeks in sickness when there is so much to do.  Have been moving on to some new work, the break was a pity.
 +
 +Have been enjoying a spot of social life as well.  We had our first dance in our recreational hall and it was most successful.  We had invited 10 AWAS and 10 WAAFS to come as well as A.I.F and RAAF - they have been very hospitable to us in their functions - but the WAAFS were unable to come.  One things and another the males preponderated and it threatened to produce a number of male wallflowers - extraordinary sight!  I had a temperature running but decided nevertheless I couldn't leave under the circumstances and ended up exhausted but still on my feet.  The week previously the Petty Officers entertained a party of WRANS at a picnic over at the island.  It was a good day.  Swimming, cricket and eating.  The cricket match was good fun.  We won (?) mostly due, I fear, to the ingenious methods of the scorer who seemed to be able to collect extra runs out of the air.   It all helps to make a pleasant break from duty.  Our hours of duty and regulations don't allow for too much of mixing outside the Services but they do some very nice things for us and we can make no complaint.
 +
 +__Gordon Mannell - England__
 +
 +I have just returned to my station after spending a very enjoyable leave amidst the Southern Scottish Highlands. I have been on several visits to this grand little country and each time I have come away with a greatly enhanced opinion of it and its people.  This last time I was the guest, together with another member of my crew, of a Mrs. Locke who lives in the charming little village of Dollar situated in the Devon valley in Clackmannanshire.  Our hostess placed bikes at our disposal to enable us to view as much of surrounding countryside as possible in the short time available.  We certainly did make good use of them.  However, the highlight of our trip was an 8 mile walking trip into the Highlands.  Yes, Dunc, I said 8m, not 28.  The first stage was to the Castle Campbell, heredity castle of the Campbell Clan, via the Glen of Sorrow.  It reminded me very much of some of our Blue Mountain streams.  From then on it was over open moor country covered with bracken and heather.  There were many of those black faced sheep with lambs grazing.  We were reluctant to leave this great spot but A.W.L. does not pay, so back to work.  I am now flying in 4 engined bombers and liking it.
 +
 +__Bill Burke - 26/7/44__
 +
 +Home sweet home once more and as yet, don't know whether to be glad or sorry.  I've had life too easy the past five months and that's not good for the morale of an infanteer.  The C.O. of the Warwick Con. Depot finally woke up to me and handed me my walking papers.  A calamity it was as I was just beginning to get some place with a daughter of one of the town's many publicans.  Alas, the gods still frown upon me, my Guardian Angel is still lost amidst the jungles of N.G. and just when I thought it was on the upgrade again too.  A civvie spotted me limping along the street and bought me a couple of beers on the strength of it, so I've decided to acquire a stooge.  In a loud voice he shall inquire about the knee I shall mumble a cheerful reply and then he shall insist on telling the chap next to him (again in a loud voice) all the horrifying details I, or should I say we, anticipate many beers. One of my many failings a tendency to blush easily, will be very handy in my new career.  Anyway to get back to my exit from the depot.  The squad marched forth to the beat of the drums, I rode forth to the roar of the engine. Again the knee.  Most of the chaps I had honoured by classifying them as my friends made some disparaging remarks, in fact some were plain nasty, but, when they arrived at the station looking weary and much the worse for wear, I could do nought but forgive them.
 +
 +The station, the train, a hospital one - a blast of the whistle and I said farewell to that fair town. I must return to the Downs one day, a beautiful country, a rolling black earth plain where the slightest shower sets the grass springing forth to greet the sun.  And so it was I left it, one vast panorama of green through which the willow banked Condamine staggered its way.  No wonder "Downsmen" are forever enthusiastic about it.
 +
 +A few days at G.D.D. awaiting draft during which I met an old mate of mine "Sykes" Bryant.  Used to be my No. 2 on the Bren at Alamein until he grew careless and stepped in front of a slug.  You may remember me writing about how we all hopped out for a cup of tea one day, well Sykes was the unlucky one.  Got over that, but the Nips at Finch made a much better job of it than Jerry?  He still has the leg, but won't be going back again.  Sounds like a warning for me doesn't it?  Wasn't sorry to leave when my number came up.  The bullion was light on and besides there were too many "animals" - both two and four legged - round the place. Both kinds fatten on the likes of me, although the first missed out this trip.  I must hand it to the place for its breed of fleas, undoubtedly the very best class and that's from one who is by way of a connoisseur of such matters.
 +
 +Another station, another train and we were off again, not forgetting of course the customary two hour wait.  No sleeping berths this year, nevertheless we weren't too badly off, with only six to a compartment.  I wasn't too proud to take the floor the first night.  Next day we were flooded out due to a leaking pipe, which didn't exactly help matters any.  We soldiered on, the hours and days passed, we played cards, we ate, we slept and ate again and then had some more to eat.  We took a risk of ruining our insides and drank the only two bad beers on the market - ginger beer and hop beer.  Piled out the windows and doors in a mad rush at mess halts as of you, but no one threatened to throw any of the R.T.O's off the station this year.  A well behaved crowd comparatively speaking.  The weather persuaded us to keep our clothes on.  Watched the kids diving for our pennies as we passed through a town.  Kiss every pretty lass we passed (Speed Gordon style) and day dreamed of other lasses in other places.  The train just rattled on, as only Q.R.s can rattle.
 +
 +Lonely paddocks, lonely homesteads, lonely women and a wisp of linen waving as we go by.  Cries of pa-er, pa-er, from the fettlers and an enterprising urchin with a bucket of tea.  Shades of the M.E.! "As you wish" when it comes to price.  I mind the time I gave a taxi driver 5 mils (1 1/2 d) didn't he scream.  Teh wamps lacked the blue flower covering, nor were there so many birds about Native Companions and ibis looking as lonely as the country itself.  The cattle runs gave way to the canefields to the pineapple and banana plantations. Unchanged save for the russet gold leaves of the pines. Pacthes of rain forest and bitter sweet memories and so the end of tho line arrived.
 +
 +Another few days in a town in which I run into my elder brother - the second time since Adolph decided to have some fun - and a few more drinks of ale.  Had busted his hand in a scrap, love to see the other chap, and after a month ashore was keen to get aboard his ship again.  One fight that did do someone some good.
 +
 +Aboard another train, up and over the hills and that night I slept on an arrangement of wire and boards called by the company a bed.  A stack of mail awaited me including a snap of the Runion.  I notice you and Bill Hall both occupy your usual commanding position.
 +
 +Received a great welcome home.  The first question the company commander aked me; "How many crime sheets against you?" and so it was for every one I met.  A look of awe spread over their faces when I proudly proclaimed a clean sheet. It just wasn't possible.  That's what comes of having a bad record.  It's time I changed home again, get some place where I'm not so well known.  I have to see a man about a cog.
  
 +Cheerio.  Regards to all,
  
-'12EITT:r]RS TROY' THE :LADS 
-Sinc& our last ws. have received letters from the following members of 
-the Walking fraternity;-7 
- Morrison Vc 11. bour?; 
-Alen Williams Di mth 
-John Green Ls Dous 
-Peter Page Frank Frt,-su=.1.27c1 
-Doric, Allden Jack 
-Grfion Mannell Bill 3,Jrke, 
-DORIS ALIDYT 12...64- Last Tri?la y-we-:,k I endE-30 up in Sick BR7 
-, 
-ania na7e been e n unpj_easan ,ffair and. W: of it 
-h07-F., I th(r;.ght I warl e5cF.p:Inbut it ,:leems that conit Jc:;z-;nopz..y t7:.fter 
-T tn1 c 1s:7.derablo c hy ?--;t1;=-,sf_ng R(ANn 
-1/KAGh ha;Iga-.1 ia Z.71,f1c2, H.everth rL or j-c ra. for all 7,11:5' is 
-c:n the :Eland, I horje to go acrE75 n'Aednesr2ay arvf, if the we;bo. i iscxoctorne 
- irk 2,74- i.. I expt 17her,:: no 11= i a-,npling it, 
-WhrinI 'nenine well cncugh to ID-p7czciatE It, I ,5,roicaed. it lly as pleasant 
-with _t,s c::_EF; shell lo];ize ia11i cream. coi ng an blue ',Dmd covs, and the most c h71,1y,g of all Yaval Fl.;_rsing S-isf=ro to go with Ji7. IY11 th=j_s ecands as J.:): I nigh4: be hotter, Add to the P,131., a clear vic3w right across o the 
-A nice place to recit...Rth a 'sore kale or a 1-ach,7? but no nc-?t 
-Lprt thic eDioodz, life has been rroc:oeding -Inte;rerit 
-and erjeytbLr, Still have much to learn of NvJ ways and cutom::-;, lork is extreme l :nterePting an do rec;ret thess w;:lstod Ih.4,->eks in sickness when 
-there much to do, Hove been moving on to some new work, the break was a pity, 
-Eavi-: been enjoying a spot of social life E.s woll. WO hat', m= fi7st dance in our recreation hail and i...,77as most ourcosful. V;e had invitd 
-10 1WI0 and 10 WAAFS to come as well as and RA.TP - they h.Dve very hcor,itable to 118 in their funct:=8 - but the WAF&.1;,:re 1;.nab1 
-Ono thin and nnother the males -orepc neratea and it ti-toned tJ rruce a nnml,e1- of male wallflowers - extraordinary cightL I h d a temporatur6.. 
-decided nevertheless I couldn't leave under the 'circumilcs (ed 
-up :. x haaptc4d hut still on my feet, The week preously tho Petty Ciff:7s 
-enrta ivad a party of WEANS at a picnic over at the It woe =a good day. ,SwinminF;. 
-cricket and eating. The cricket match was gnor3. fun. W(=, won.(?) 
-mos tly I ff3ar, to the ingenious methods of the scorer who :.c,c,1ed to 
-ab1,7: to collect extra runs out of the air, It all helw to ;:!.akr, a pleasant 1D7 n:om daty, Our :hours of duty 6.na.Togulations clon't allow of too much 
-mixng ciit3ide the Services but they do some very nice things for us and we can mak::: no (;(:,m]plai nt, 
-GORDON YANliELL ENGLANT, I ha7e just eturned to my station after spending 
-a very enjoyable leave amiocc the Southern :Scottish Highlands. I have been on several visits to thia grand. Little country and each time I have come away with a greatly enhanced opinion of it and its peo::;le This last time I was 
-the guest, together with another member of my cTevi, of n Mrs. Locke who lives in the charming little village of Dollar situated in the Devon valley in Clackmannanshire. Our hostess placed bikes at our disposal to enable us to 
-view as much of surrounding countryside as possible in the short time avai2 Rle?.e, we certainly die, make good use of them, However the highliht of our telp was an 8 mile waling trip into the Highlands, Yes, Dune, I said 8m, 27.er. 28 The first stage- was to the Castle Campnell, heredity castle of the 
-Cilepbell iia the Glen of Sorrow, It reminded me very much of soTo cf ou Llue Yeuntal:e 04:12oelms1 From then on it was over onen moor oounte-y cove e:eed a'th b)2re:zon and ?eee ther, There W078 many of those bleck faced sheep 
-wiAh lambsglea z.l ng. We wero reluotant to leave this great spot but A,W,Lo does not pay, no back to work, I am now flying in 4 ougined bombers and liking it. 
-DI= perpn 2r_r, L4 vr,ree sweet home once more read as yet, don't know 
-wleethe i to bo clad or co-rry. I:ve bad life too easy the past five months and that's not good for the mnrale of an infant:seri The C,O. of the Warwick Con,Dect fDinally M73d` U71 to me and handed me my walking pepers. A calamji:y it war:, as T was just b,egnr:.ng to get some place with a daughter of one ot the te-ones Tany 1:-eb]leene, L11.om: t'ele Gods still frown upon me, my Guardian 
-Angel is still leee the jungles of NOG, and just when I thought thee:: 
-it emo en the un grac"..e again too, A civvie spotted me limping alc ng the street and bought me a couple of beers on the strength of it, so I've decided toe. acquire a stooge. In a loud voice he shall inquire about the knee I shall mumble a cheerful reply and then he shall inFist on telling the chap next to him (again in a loud voice) all the horrifying details I. or should I say we, anticipate many beers. One of my many failings a tendency to bluish easily, will be very handy in my new career. Anyway to get back to my exit from the depot. The squad marched forth to the beat of the drums, I rode forth to the roar of the engine. Again the knee. Most of the chaps I had honoured by 
-classifying them as my friends made some disparaging remarks, in fact some 
-were plain nasty, but, when they arrived at the station looking. weary and much the worse for wear, I could do nought but forgive them, 
-The station, the train, a hospital one. blast of the whistle and I said farewell to that fair town, I must return to the Downs one day, a lecatltiful country, a rolling black earth plain where the slightest shower sets the grass springing forth to greet the sun. And so it was I left it, one vast panorama of green through which the willow banked Comdamine stagsered its way. No wonder "Downsmen" are forever enthusiastic about it. 
-A few days at G,D,D, awaiting draft durinp; which I met an old mate of mine "Sykes" Pryant. Used to be my No:2 on the Bren at Alamein until he 
-grew careless and stepped in front of a slug, You may remember me writing about how we all hopped out for a cup of tea one day, well Sykes was the 
-lenlucky one. Got over that, but the Nips at Finch made a much better job oe: it than Jerry? He still has the leg, but won't be going back again, Sounds like a warning for me doesn't it? Wasn't sorry to leave when my number came up, The bullion was light on and. besides there were too many "animals" both two and four'legged round the place, Both kinds fatten on the itkos of me, although the first missed out this trip, I must hand it to the place for its breed of fleas, 1,.ndoubtedly the very best class arid that 'e frthm one who io by way of a ms-eleree.F.,5ru7 on ;. 12.ch matt era 
-Another station, another train ana we were oil' again, not forgetting of course,the customary tuo hour wait, No sleeping berths this year nevertheless we werent too badly off, with only six to a compartment, I 
-11, 
-wa5n'i; too pru. to take the floor the f-Irst 6ay 
-(31.1 to a leaktng 
-the h o1;.1..c3'ad_..tqays- ".10 
-again a7(1.:;:;.1.haa z321:11e-T.Liore, ta.:eat,,Cit6.*''a'rick of 
-and 'drank )che-only tWo bad beers on the maret bcer 
-Piled out of windc,.Ts-and doorr; in a ma C rush at ies ai cf y:),:n, but 
-no ono threatened to thrcW any of thri n.T,C;S c-A-'f the c-..;atic11_ t"tlis A Toil 1.:chaV:a crowd com3arati7ely spe,akj ng, The cceath:2r 7r,e7s1::a::71.Pd 
-k'p71).r clat:lescn. Watched the kic::.F.,-flivinr; fcr cyx o -conn7...el. as we 7)a;,;r3ed 
-t'17011g'.:1 a town, Kipse(, s7ery -Dretty lass vm rnss5ra (,Speed Gcr:_;o7L, (-:tyl()) 
-day r17eamed cf othar a.rasScs in'otheT .The traia just J.'attl2do on, aE. only c,,,123 
-, Lenr)ly73.ad:lock-s, aorely homesterld!:7, women an:i. a vW:qo of 
-ac we go by, Cries _of fetters and 
-with a thicket tc-a, Shades. of thr.--.M.E1 0As you 
-when it (,cmcs to,pr:'.ce I mind the time I gavP. a 
-(1411) dir'.n5t he scream.. The swamtn lasller3 thu blue floir:er covering7 nor 
-there so many birds about Native Compamion,.:-.1 and ibis J.nckins ar lonely 
-;i he errantry itself. 71i o cattle flrIF F-7,1TO Way to t'n, canefiel6s to the 
-piricaplo-Je and. banana :plantations, Unchanp;nd save for the russet gold leaves of the p:i nes. ?aches of. rain forest aud bitter owect ilicmories and so i;ho end of tho lino. arrived. 
-Another few days in a town in which I run into Ty e7dr brother the F,ertord tlne since Adolph decided to have some fun 7,,n6 a few more drin1-..s of ale, Tad 'ousted his hand in a scrape love tci see the ot'ner 
-and -after a month ashore was keen to get aboard his r ihi-0 On fight that did do soTPone some good. 
-Aboard another train7 up and over the hills and that niht I clelot ot trrangemcnt of wire and boards called by the coripany a becl, A stack 
-of mail awaited mc including a snap of the Runion. I notice you and ,7311 11,?..11 both occupy your usual commanding position., 
-Peciel a great welcome home. The first gustien 2r,h, comflan:r co;rimailder :=aked me; "How many crime sheets ,liTinst you?" an so it was for ev2ry one I mt.1 A look of awe slci7:ed over their faces 7'ne/.1 I 
-prol)al-;-.5.1med a clean sheet, It just Tasnt possilo. mbat's w1-,at ouos ct hIrr; a had record, It's t ir I changed homes -)Rain, gP.t some place. where I?m not so well knom I have to see a man about a cos-, 
-R:,sards to all? 
 Bill. Bill.
-*. 
-v 
-....111.11,1. 0.  
-VOI.OMMe 
  
 +----
  
 ==== Federation Report ==== ==== Federation Report ====
194409.txt ยท Last modified: 2017/11/09 13:23 by tyreless