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195311 [2012/05/25 13:50]
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195311 [2016/11/28 11:17]
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-THE_SYDNEY +======The Sydney Bushwalker====== 
-kmonthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, C/- Ingersoll Hall, 25.6 Crown St Sydney. + 
-No.227 NOVEDUKER, 1953 Price 6d, +A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, C/- Ingersoll Hall, 256 Crown St., Sydney. 
-EditorJim Brown, 103 Gipps St., Sales & Subs.Jess Martin + 
-Drummoyne. Typed by Jean Harvey +===No.228. October, 1953Price 6d.=== 
-Production and BUsiness ManagerBrian Harvey (JW1462) + 
-CONTENTS+|**Editor**|Jim Brown, 103 Gipps St, Drummoyne| 
-Page +|**Sales & Subs.**|Jess Martin| 
-Editorial - The Pruning Season 1 +|**Typed by**|Jean Harvey| 
-Siedlecky's Taxi & Tourist Service (Advertisement) 3 +|**Production and Business Manager**|Brian Harvey (JW1462)| 
-At the October General Meeting 3 + 
-The Matterhorn - A Traverse, by Leon Blumer 5 +=====Contents.===== 
-Leica Photo Service (Advertisement) 7 + 
-More Inflation, By nCrikeyn +| | |Page| 
-For We Ourselves Have Said It 10 +|Editorial - The Pruning Season| | 1| 
-Sanitarium Health Food Shop (Advertisement) 11 +|At the October General Meeting| | 3| 
-Survival of the Fittest 12 +|The Matterhorn - A Traverse|Leon Blumer5| 
-Scenic Motor Tours (Advertisement) 13 +|More Inflation|"Crikey"9| 
-The Monster of Erskine Gap, by Jim Brown 13 Wild Flowers and Our Feelings, by Clem Hallstrom 16 Federation Notes - October Meeting+|For We Ourselves Have Said It| |10| 
-by Allen A. Strom 17 +|Survival of the Fittest| |12| 
-Shopping Lists Are In Season (Paddy'Advert.) 18 +|The Monster of Erskine Gap|Jim Brown|13
-EDITORIAL. +|Wild Flowers and Our Feelings|Clem Hallstrom|16
-The Prunina Season.+|Federation Notes - October Meeting|Allen A. Strom|17| 
 + 
 +=====Advertisements.===== 
 + 
 +| |Page| 
 +|Siedlecky's Taxi and Tourist Service| 3| 
 +|Leica Photo Service| 7| 
 +|The Sanitarium Health Food Shop|11| 
 +|Scenic Motor Tours|13| 
 +|Shopping Lists Are In Season Paddy'Advertisement|18| 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Editorial - The Pruning Season.===== 
 At the Committee Meeting of October, the names of about 60 unfinancial members were crossed off the books. The number was made up of approximately 40 "active" and 20 non-active members, and reduced the total membership in all categories to 216. Notification is being sent to all concerned. At the Committee Meeting of October, the names of about 60 unfinancial members were crossed off the books. The number was made up of approximately 40 "active" and 20 non-active members, and reduced the total membership in all categories to 216. Notification is being sent to all concerned.
-2. + 
-Some of those removed from the books will certainly apply for re-instatement, and it is probable that a number previously on the "active" list will ask to be restored as non-active, and that Committewill approve most requests of this kind. However, the majority of those crossed off will simply pass out of the records of the Club, and in one year we will show a wastage of more than forty members. +Some of those removed from the books will certainly apply for re-instatement, and it is probable that a number previously on the "active" list will ask to be restored as non-active, and that Committe will approve most requests of this kind. However, the majority of those crossed off will simply pass out of the records of the Club, and in one year we will show a wastage of more than forty members. 
-To date the intake of new mambers this year has been 11, and with only 15 names on the current list of prospective members, it is quite certain that the end of the club year on January 31st will see us with depleted numbers. As a comparison, the following tabulation, taken from annual reports, may be of interest: + 
-1953 +To date the intake of new members this year has been 11, and with only 15 names on the current list of prospective members, it is quite certain that the end of the club year on January 31st will see us with depleted numbers. As a comparison, the following tabulation, taken from annual reports, may be of interest: 
-203 + 
-49 +|As at Jan. 31st|1941|1945|1947|1949|1950|1951|1952|1953| 
-20 +|Active members|237|259|238|225|223|215|216|203| 
-47 +|Non-active members|25|39|45|56|51|57|63|49| 
-Note:- (x)- During 1947 all members who had been on active service +|Intake during year|28|26|30|37|26|28|32|20| 
-with the Forcesand had not returned to the Club were +|Crossed off or resigned during year|13|4|52(x)|37|32|30|25|47
-crossed off + 
-...._____-__-_-2.----___-___------____----- +Note:- (x) - During 1947 all members who had been on active service with the Forces and had not returned to the Club were crossed off. 
-That will be the consequences of this reduction of membership? Of course, it does not necessarily denote a diminution of our liveliness, as most the "active" walkers affected were in fact totally non-active, either as walkers or in any other aspect of Club enterprise_ indeed,'on proportionate basis, it leaves us rather more active than we were, and from a thoroughly mercenary viewpoint the principal result in the loss of revenue - scmething like one-sixth of our previous annual income. + 
-Here one might readily digress with an analysis of our income aid expenditure, pointing to variable items, such as postages, which are largely influenced by membership: while other costs are constant, such as rental of Club room. The fact is that we will not be able to live "in the manner to which we have been accustomed" if the present trend continues. +What will be the consequences of this reduction of membership? Of course, it does not necessarily denote a diminution of our liveliness, as most of the "active" walkers affected were in fact totally non-active, either as walkers or in any other aspect of Club enterprise. Indeed, on proportionate basis, it leaves us rather more active than we were, and from a thoroughly mercenary viewpoint the principal result in the loss of revenue - something like one-sixth of our previous annual income. 
-For some years our membersnip was reasonably stable. Last year a reduction was evident, and this year a steep decline is indicated. It is probably a direct product of the generally waning interest in which we have remarked previously, the reasons for which seem to be numerous and varied. While we should not be alarmed by the tendency, WE should perhaps consider what we want the Club to be in the future. Are we content to see our numbers falling? Do we believe it will presently level out at a satisfactory figure? Or do we feel that some action should be taken to stabilise or increase our membership? + 
-This has been a vexed problem in the past, when Club opinion has generally been opposed to promiscuous growth, or any for of advertising for new members. Certainly there is a maximum figure at which the jobs of some officers, notably Treasurer and Secretary, would become too onerous altogether. In any case, lowering of our standard of +Here one might readily digress with an analysis of our income and expenditure, pointing to variable items, such as postages, which are largely influenced by membership: while other costs are constant, such as rental of Club room. The fact is that we will not be able to live "in the manner to which we have been accustomed" if the present trend continues. 
-As at Jan. 31st 1941 1945 1947 1949. 1950 1951 1952 + 
-IOLS MM=m1.00 =m As. m..a.sisl w wIla,bmaa mum w.  arm ma.,..s.a    +For some years our membersnip was reasonably stable. Last year a reduction was evident, and this year a steep decline is indicated. It is probably a direct product of the generally waning interest in which we have remarked previously, the reasons for which seem to be numerous and varied. While we should not be alarmed by the tendency, we should perhaps consider what we want the Club to be in the future. Are we content to see our numbers falling? Do we believe it will presently level out at a satisfactory figure? Or do we feel that some action should be taken to stabilise or increase our membership? 
-   Mairovr    + 
-Active member 237 259 238 225 223 215 216 +This has been a vexed problem in the past, when Club opinion has generally been opposed to promiscuous growth, or any form of advertising for new members. Certainly there is a maximum figure at which the jobs of some officers, notably Treasurer and Secretary, would become too onerous altogether. In any case, lowering of our standard of admission would be an undesirable thing. The point calling for consideration is whether we wish to embark on something in the nature of a recruiting drive to maintain our membership. Should we agree to move in that direction we must be careful that our decision is not dictated by the selfish desire to secure more funds for the gratification of existing members. The Club is the thing, and the only motive which should govern our thoughts is the continued welfare of the walking game to which the Club has contributed, and can continue to contribute, so much. 
-Non-active members 25 39 45 56 51 57 63 + 
-Intake during year 28 26 30 37 26 28 32 +---- 
-Crossed off or 13 4 52(x) 37 32 30 25 + 
-resigned during year       +=====At The October General Meeting.===== 
-3. +
-IMPORTANT TRANSPORT NOTICE. +
-BUSHWALKERS REQUIRING TRANSPORT +
-FROM BLACKHEATH   ANY HOUR +
-RING WRITE OR CALL   +
-SIEDLECKYIS TAXI AND TOURIST SERVICE, +
-116 STATION STREET BLACEHEATH. +
-2 4 HOUR SERVICE +
-BUSHWALKERS arriving at Blackheath late at night without transport booking can ring for car from Railway Station or call at above address - IT'S NEVER TOO'LATEI +
-SaNNENNOZMIZWZ7ZZ1Zr.71;;MORMONA=Mag=5 +
-'PHONE B7HEATH 81 OR 146. LOOK FOR CARS T03210 or TV270 +
-OR BOOK AT MARK SALON RADIO SHOP - OP?. STATION. +
-admission would be an undesirable thing. The point caling for consideration is whether we wish to embark on something in the nature of a recruiting drive to maintain our membership. Should we agree to move in that direction we must be careful that our decision is not dictated by the selfish desire to secure more funds for the gratification of existing members. The Club is the thing, and the only motive which should govern our thoughts is the continued welfare of the walking game to which the Club has contributed, and can continue to contribute, so much. +
-AT THE OCTOBER GENERAL MEETING.+
 Reported by Alex Colley. Reported by Alex Colley.
-Latecomers seeing a stream of walkers merging into Crown Street shortly after 8 p.m. on the night of the General Meeting might well have believed that the Noises Off Club was staging a revival, but the real reason for the exodus was that the door of the Club Room couldn't be opened. Fortunately the fire escape door was open and so a street corner meeting in Crown Street was averted. The new entrance provided no cover for late-comers, who perforce made an impressive entry up the + 
-broad stairs past a jardiniere of gum-leaves instead of slinking in by the side door. The arrival of Mr. Henley aad Miss Steenbhm, announced by Mr. Moppett, was most elegant.+Latecomers seeing a stream of walkers merging into Crown Street shortly after 8 p.m. on the night of the General Meeting might well have believed that the Noises Off Club was staging a revival, but the real reason for the exodus was that the door of the Club Room couldn't be opened. Fortunately the fire escape door was open and so a street corner meeting in Crown Street was averted. The new entrance provided no cover for late-comers, who perforce made an impressive entry up the broad stairs past a jardiniere of gum-leaves instead of slinking in by the side door. The arrival of Mr. Henley and Miss Steenbhom, announced by Mr. Moppett, was most elegant. 
 Correspondence revealed that Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Carlon,  Mrs. C. Devitt, Messrs. Colin Broad and Roy Bennett had been elected to Honorary Membership, while Mr. Coates of Hilltop, who had been very helpful to Club members, has been offered Honorary Membership. Correspondence revealed that Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Carlon,  Mrs. C. Devitt, Messrs. Colin Broad and Roy Bennett had been elected to Honorary Membership, while Mr. Coates of Hilltop, who had been very helpful to Club members, has been offered Honorary Membership.
 +
 From the Y.M.C.A. Ramblers came invitation for 12 of our members to attend their annual camp at Yarramundi, on 21st and 22nd November. From the Y.M.C.A. Ramblers came invitation for 12 of our members to attend their annual camp at Yarramundi, on 21st and 22nd November.
-The Treasurer's Report provided evidence of a very satisfactory round-up of late payers. No less than E19.10.0 had been collected in subscriptions. In fact it au-pears from correspondence that all but one has paid (Far be it from us to point the finger). (Alas - far more than one - Editor.) 
-The Conservation Secretary's Report described a Conference on Bushf ire Control, presided over by the Chcirman of the Bushfires Committee, Mr. Messer. At the conference Mr. Morris, Bushfire 
-liaison officer of the Sutherland Shire Council had described the Fire Fighting Centre at Sutherland Council Chambers and Brigades at Engadin and Heathcote, which include in their areas portion of National Park eastward to Kangaroo Creek,also the brigades at I":aterfall Sanitorium, Loftus and Bundeena, and some further away from National Park. He asked what manpower Bashwalkers might provide for bushfire fighting in National Park, using the Park's equipment and with assistance and direction from members of the various Sutherland Shire Bushfire Brigad, 
-Tom Moppett explained that Mr. Morris's idea was that any bush- walkers in the park during bushf ire periods might report fires and Perhaps help the brigades. Some discussion ensued, in Which Gil Webb suggested that the provision of a good c,amp site Might be an inducemeni to bushwalkers to stay around ready to help. It was decided to appoin a Committee consisting of Malcolm McGregor, Tom Moppett, Paul Barnes, Allen Strom and Alex Colley to report on the practicability of the suggestion. 
-Rumours of a road to Era were discussed. The most likely source of the rumours seemed to be Mr. Hawkin's Statement that Era should be  opened to the public. 
-In the 'absence of further subjects. for discussion the meeting was closed 35 minutes after it started. The problem of how to lock the fire-escape from the outside was solved, happily, by the arrival of the key to the main door. 
-.....MmimManJKOMPIMPIIIMI00.11.11AMIRMUMIM 
-INSTRUCTIONAL gEK-END. ,Roy Bruggyfs programmed walk for November -21-275th has been converted into an Instructional Valk, the camp to be held at Moorabinda. Rest of details as advertised. 
  
-5+The Treasurer's Report provided evidence of a very satisfactory round-up of late payersNo less than £19.10.0 had been collected in subscriptions. In fact it appears from correspondence that all but one has paid (Far be it from us to point the finger). (Alas - far more than one - Editor.) 
-THE EETELHORN+ 
 +The Conservation Secretary's Report described a Conference on Bushfire Control, presided over by the Chairman of the Bushfires Committee, Mr. Messer. At the conference Mr. Morris, Bushfire liaison officer of the Sutherland Shire Council had described the Fire Fighting Centre at Sutherland Council Chambers and Brigades at Engadin and Heathcote, which include in their areas portion of National Park eastward to Kangaroo Creek, also the brigades at Waterfall Sanitorium, Loftus and Bundeena, and some further away from National Park. He asked what manpower Bushwalkers might provide for bushfire fighting in National Park, using the Park's equipment and with assistance and direction from members of the various Sutherland Shire Bushfire Brigade. 
 + 
 +Tom Moppett explained that Mr. Morris's idea was that any bushwalkers in the park during bushfire periods might report fires and perhaps help the brigades. Some discussion ensued, in which Gil Webb suggested that the provision of a good camp site might be an inducement to bushwalkers to stay around ready to help. It was decided to appoint a Committee consisting of Malcolm McGregor, Tom Moppett, Paul Barnes, Allen Strom and Alex Colley to report on the practicability of the suggestion. 
 + 
 +Rumours of a road to Era were discussed. The most likely source of the rumours seemed to be Mr. Hawkin's statement that Era should be opened to the public. 
 + 
 +In the absence of further subjects for discussion the meeting was closed 35 minutes after it started. The problem of how to lock the fire-escape from the outside was solved, happily, by the arrival of the key to the main door. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===Instructional Weekend.=== 
 + 
 +Roy Bruggy's programmed walk for November 28-29th has been converted into an Instructional Walk, the camp to be held at Moorabinda. Rest of details as advertised. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====The Matterhorn - A Traverse.===== 
 By Leon Blumer. By Leon Blumer.
-As we gradually approached the hut in the late afternoon the Hornli ridge loomed above our heads. Ye had already viewed the Matterhorn from various sides aad marvelled at its impossible outline, its airy ridges and faces, so it was with a little trepidation that Brian and I tried to visualise the route for the next morning. Such was our respect for the peak that ze had left Janet at Zermatt, Janet having been with us previously on the Dent Blanche, a much more difficult peak in all respects. + 
-The +As we gradually approached the hut in the late afternoon the Hornli ridge loomed above our heads. We had already viewed the Matterhorn from various sides aad marvelled at its impossible outline, its airy ridges and faces, so it was with a little trepidation that Brian and I tried to visualise the route for the next morning. Such was our respect for the peak that we had left Janet at Zermatt, Janet having been with us previously on the Dent Blanche, a much more difficult peak in all respects. 
-blanket soup (so provided This was we slept + 
-hut, of course, was full to the brim, so we grabbed a +The hut, of course, was full to the brim, so we grabbed a blanket each and slept on the table after the usual supper of maggi soup (so thick that a spoon would stand upright). Ropes and rucksack provided the necessary padding, and we actually slept for a few hours. This was our fourth week in the Alps and we cared little when and where we slept. 
-each and slept an the table after the usual supper of maggi thick that a spoon would stand upright). Ropes and rucksack the necessary padding, and we actually slept for a few hours. our fourth week in the Alps and we cared little When said wher( +  
-Rising at 2.30 a.m. is always a horrible affair, especially when other people are striving to get away before the app ointed time. Despite the confusion we joined in with the hordes about 5 a.m. in the chill light of dawn. Down below, Zermatt was still covered by a sea of clouds - very beautiful when the first rays of the sun touched this billowy sea. It was going to be a fine day, a necessity for the ever-changing Matterhorn. +Rising at 2.30 a.m. is always a horrible affair, especially when other people are striving to get away before the appointed time. Despite the confusion we joined in with the hordes about 5 a.m. in the chill light of dawn. Down below, Zermatt was still covered by a sea of clouds - very beautiful when the first rays of the sun touched this billowy sea. It was going to be a fine day, a necessity for the ever-changing Matterhorn. 
-The first two hours were spent scrambling with the crowds along a rather loose ridge, with a splendid view of the east face. Some of the Zermatt guides donft believe in manners, and Brian, as leader, had a brush with one who pushed past into the few remaining feet between a previous party and ourselves. It is very annoying to climb under thesc conditions, but gradually the parties thinned out aad we recovered our previous good humour. + 
-Afterthe Solway Refuge the ridge narrowed and shot up vertically, the climbing becoming very difficult and exposed. We were held up by a few more slow parties, some with rather poor rope techniqlle, but we managed to pass on some easier gendarmes until a 100-ft. ice slope was reached. We followed the example of an Austrian couple and donned crampons for this stretch, but felt afterwards that it would have been perfectly safe in boots. It was quite windy and cold above this, so hastened to remove crampons and came quickly to the fixed ropes below the shoulder. The exposure here was good - one slip and we would fly downwards into thin air for thousands of feet. In our enthusiasm we pressed on up the fixed ropes, iced-up and progress so slaw that, aftel, the first 200-ft. my fingers lost feeling, and I found myself ready to faint through cold shock. +The first two hours were spent scrambling with the crowds along a rather loose ridge, with a splendid view of the east face. Some of the Zermatt guides don'believe in manners, and Brian, as leader, had a brush with one who pushed past into the few remaining feet between a previous party and ourselves. It is very annoying to climb under these conditions, but gradually the parties thinned out and we recovered our previous good humour. 
-Luckily Brian was leading aad did not seem too badly affected but as we had been going for four hours, we stopped on a sunny platform for second breakfast. Out of the bitter wind we filled ourselves with concentrated food and quickly recovered strength and warmth. There is more to mountaineering than pure climbing, and I have heard of leaders falling off climbs through neglecting this first principle. + 
-6.+After the Solway Refuge the ridge narrowed and shot up vertically, the climbing becoming very difficult and exposed. We were held up by a few more slow parties, some with rather poor rope technique, but we managed to pass on some easier gendarmes until a 100-ft. ice slope was reached. We followed the example of an Austrian couple and donned crampons for this stretch, but felt afterwards that it would have been perfectly safe in boots. It was quite windy and cold above this, so hastened to remove crampons and came quickly to the fixed ropes below the shoulder. The exposure here was good - one slip and we would fly downwards into thin air for thousands of feet. In our enthusiasm we pressed on up the fixed ropes, iced-up and progress so slow that, after the first 200-ft. my fingers lost feeling, and I found myself ready to faint through cold shock. 
 + 
 +Luckily Brian was leading and did not seem too badly affected but as we had been going for four hours, we stopped on a sunny platform for second breakfast. Out of the bitter wind we filled ourselves with concentrated food and quickly recovered strength and warmth. There is more to mountaineering than pure climbing, and I have heard of leaders falling off climbs through neglecting this first principle. 
 Without the fixed ropes the Matterhorn would be a most interesting climb indeed. Without the fixed ropes the Matterhorn would be a most interesting climb indeed.
-Numerous parties passed either up or down Whilst we enjoyed our snack and silent reverie. The clouds above Zermatt were clearing and showed the town nestling like a jewel between steep hills and fields Ourold friends, Dent Blanche and Zinal Rotham looked particularly fierce, stray WisIDS of cloud hovering round their mnmits and ridges. An Imerican girl and guide passed, the girl remarking that it was the first and last time she would ever climb a mountain. She had a bad habit of clutching the ropes and swinging like a pendulum, so I can only say that guides do earn their money with most people. + 
-More fixed ropes led up the steep nose to the top of the actual shoulder, somewhere near the position of the famous Whymper party accident. This was nice and airy, with a 300-ft. steep rock and ice slope which plunged down to our ridge to the overhanging slabs of the west face. ffe tried to save time here by climbing the first 150-ft. of ice-steps in boots, but quickly became involved with descending parties. We had too much rope out, Brian being belayed about half-way down the slope. After a muddle of about five minutes, plus some hard words exchanged with guides and other descending parties, I managed to bring Brian up to a safe position raid we used crampons for the remainder of the slope. There is much danger in having too many parties on a peak, and one slip here would have been disastrous. We had already been told by an English climber of the lone Austrian who, before his eyes, had slipped and plummetted down the same ice slope.+Numerous parties passed either up or down whilst we enjoyed our snack and silent reverie. The clouds above Zermatt were clearing and showed the town nestling like a jewel between steep hills and fields. Our old friends, Dent Blanche and Zinal Rotham looked particularly fierce, stray wisps of cloud hovering round their summits and ridges. An American girl and guide passed, the girl remarking that it was the first and last time she would ever climb a mountain. She had a bad habit of clutching the ropes and swinging like a pendulum, so I can only say that guides do earn their money with most people. 
 + 
 +More fixed ropes led up the steep nose to the top of the actual shoulder, somewhere near the position of the famous Whymper party accident. This was nice and airy, with a 300-ft. steep rock and ice slope which plunged down to our ridge to the overhanging slabs of the west face. We tried to save time here by climbing the first 150-ft. of ice-steps in boots, but quickly became involved with descending parties. We had too much rope out, Brian being belayed about half-way down the slope. After a muddle of about five minutes, plus some hard words exchanged with guides and other descending parties, I managed to bring Brian up to a safe position and we used crampons for the remainder of the slope. There is much danger in having too many parties on a peak, and one slip here would have been disastrous. We had already been told by an English climber of the lone Austrian who, before his eyes, had slipped and plummetted down the same ice slope. 
 We breasted the ridge and were struck by a feeling of great height and remoteness. All other people, except a lone Swiss and the Austrian couple, had departed, and it was very pleasant to balance along to the Italian summit to admire the splendid view. We breasted the ridge and were struck by a feeling of great height and remoteness. All other people, except a lone Swiss and the Austrian couple, had departed, and it was very pleasant to balance along to the Italian summit to admire the splendid view.
-We had already taken six hours, much more time than we had intended, and we had doubts as to whether to attempt the complete traverse. The Italian face fell away below our feet in a dizzy precipice, and by craning our necks we could see that the Italian ridge butted against it somewhere below us on the right. Mist rose + 
-up to meet us and this made it seem all the more spectacular. We knew it was a difficult ridge, and we nervously considered the pros and cons. Will we or won't we? Yes, we will! (This with a confidence we did not feel.) We committed ourselves gingerly to the first section with a large amount of anxiety, I being painfully aware of sweaty hands and a pumping heart.+We had already taken six hours, much more time than we had intended, and we had doubts as to whether to attempt the complete traverse. The Italian face fell away below our feet in a dizzy precipice, and by craning our necks we could see that the Italian ridge butted against it somewhere below us on the right. Mist rose up to meet us and this made it seem all the more spectacular. We knew it was a difficult ridge, and we nervously considered the pros and cons. Will we or won't we? Yes, we will! (This with a confidence we did not feel.) We committed ourselves gingerly to the first section with a large amount of anxiety, I being painfully aware of sweaty hands and a pumping heart. 
 The third cord, a rope ladder, was rather horrible, iced-up, decayed, and with a few rungs missing. It swings out over the precipice, and creaks and groans when, at half-way, you have to transfer to the inside rungs. I have usually a steady head over sheer space but was acutely conscious of the fact that it would be impossible to hold once the ladder broke. The mist enveloped us more than once and added to the sublimity of the depths. The third cord, a rope ladder, was rather horrible, iced-up, decayed, and with a few rungs missing. It swings out over the precipice, and creaks and groans when, at half-way, you have to transfer to the inside rungs. I have usually a steady head over sheer space but was acutely conscious of the fact that it would be impossible to hold once the ladder broke. The mist enveloped us more than once and added to the sublimity of the depths.
-The Italian shoulder was reached and the going, though still + 
-exposed, became much easier up and down jagged gendarnes. We were the +The Italian shoulder was reached and the going, though still exposed, became much easier up and down jagged gendarnes. We were the only two on that side but nanaged to find scratch marks and occasional footsteps on the snowy parts of the ridge. Most of the rock strata sloped downwards and outwards and there were some pitches which would equal any severe English rock climb if the ropes were removed. Below one especially difficult pitch which Brian (as last man) had to rope down, we found a plaque commemorating a famous Swiss guide, Otto Tuhrer who was killed last year by the cord breaking. We congratulated ourselves on our slower but surer belay technique. 
-7. + 
-PHOTOGRAPHY ! I ! +We lost the route after this, and found ourselves on the precipitous Italian face. We tried twice to find the route before realising that scratch marks led above a snow slope, around a corner and across to the main ridge. To have kept down the face on a subsidiary ridge would have been suicidal. Stones rattle down this at all hours. 
-1 You press the buttons. we'll do the rest ! + 
-Finegrain +About 3.0 p.m., after a few more difficult pitches down the ridge, the Savoia hut was reached, a welcome sight to two weary climbers. This refuge is perched on a small gap in the ridges and occupies quite an airy position - no place for sleepwalkers. Two Italian climbers occupied it, and generously offered us a cup of tea. One side of the hut was littered with empty Chianti bottles, so we should imagine the Italian side is not without its attractions. We brewed a marvellous soup on our small petrol stove and, while drinking this, an Englishman, with friend and two guides burst into the hut and complimented us an our route-finding tactics. We had been observed from 3,000-ft. below dithering about near the small snow patch, and the Italian guides seemed happy that they did not need to go looking for us that evening. We gathered from the Englishman that the way dawn from the Col du Lion was perfectly straightforward, so we gaily set forth over the few remaining pitches to the Col. 
-Developing + 
-!Sparkling +Our triumph was short-lived. To the right the cliff looked steep and loose, below us a steep snow couloir led down to the glacier, but we did not want rocks on our heads that time of day. We tried three times to find the route, so in desperation followed down a loose rock wall to the left of cliffs overhanging the main glacier. We slunk down in our shame, hoping that our bad route finding was not being observed by the friendly Italians. 
-i Prints + 
-Perfect +A hail from the hut 700-ft0 above our heads showed they were still taking an interest in our future. Too late, we were then half-way down the rocky wall. On the glacier a further shock awaited us - an 8O-ft. ice cliff above an enormous gaping bergschrund, probably 100 - 150-ft. deep, brought us to a sickening halt. Lord, what will we do? However we climbed over to below the rock cliffs at their junction with the ice and Brian played out the rope as I climbed down 50-ft. to a frail looking ice bridge, where I managed to belay with the axe. It was difficult, Brian half-climbing half-abseiling from a small spike of rock, which I had to watch closely for any signs of giving. Half-way down the rope was flicked off, and drew in the slack. Here was probably the most dangerous moment of the whole day, and it was with genuine relief that my friend reached the ice bridge and rejoined me. 
-Bniargetnents +
-Your +
-Rollfilms +
-or +
-Leica films +
-deserve the +
-best SERVICE +
-LEICA +
-PHOTO +
-SERVICE, +
-31 Macquarie Place +
-SYDNEY N.S.W. +
-only two on that side but nanaged to find scratch marks and occasional footsteps on the snowy parts of the ridge. Most of the rock strata sloped downwards and outwards and there were some pitches which would equal any severe English rock climb if the ropes were removed. Below one especially difficult pitch which Brian (as last man) had to rope down, we found a plaque commemorating a famous Swiss guide, Otto Tuhrer who was killed last year by the cord breaking. We congratulated ourselves on our slower but surer belay technique. +
-We lost the route after this, and found ourselves on the precipitous Italian face. We tried twice to find the route before realising that scratch marks led above a snow slope, around a corner and across to the main ridge. To have kept dcmn the face on a subsidiary ridge would have been suicidal. Stones rattle down this at all hours. +
-About 3.0 p.m., after a few more difficult pitches down the ridge, the Savoia hut was reached, a welcome sight to two weary climbers. This refuge is perched on a small gap in the ridges and occupies quite an airy position - no place for sleepwalkers. Two Italian climbers occupied it, and generously offered us a cup of tea. One side of the +
-8. +
-hut was littered with empty Chianti bottles, so we should imagine the Italian side is not without its attractions. We brewed a marvellous soup an our small petrol stove and, while drinking this, an Englishmal, with friend and two guides burst into the hut and complimented us an our route-finding tactics. We had been observed from 3,000-ft. beim dithering about near the small snow patch, and the Italian guides seemed happy that they did not need to go looking for us that evening. We gathered from the Englishman that the way dawn from the Col du Lion was perfectly straightforward, so we gaily set forth over the few remaining pitches to tire Col. +
-Our triumph was dhort-lived. To the right the cliff looked steep and loose, below us a steep snow couloir led down to the glacier, but we did not want rocks on cur heads that time of day. We tried three times to find the route, so in desperation followed down a loose rock wall to the left of cliffs overhanging the main glacier. We slunk down in our shame, hoping that our bad route finding was not being observed by the friendly Italians. +
-A hail from the hut 700-ft0 above our heads showed they were stil, taking an interest in our future. Too late, we were then half-way day,' the rocky wall. On the glacier a further shock awaited us - an 8O1. ice cliff above an enormous gaping bergschrund, probably 100 - 150-ft0 +
-deep, brought us to a sickening half. Lord, what will we do? However we climbed over to below the rock cliffs at their junction with the ice and Brian played out the rope as I climbed down 50-ft. to a frail looking ice bridge, where I managed to belay with the axe. It was difficult, Brian half-climbing half-abseiling from a small spike of rock, which I had to watch closely for any signs af giving. Half-way down the rope was flicked off, and T. drew in the slack. Here was probably the most dangerous moment of the Whole day, and it was with genuine relief that my friend reached the ice bridge and rejoined me.+
 It took only a moment to recoil the rope, and we were flying down the glacier in the gathering twilight. We noticed a huge stone shoot down the couloir so decided we had probably chosen the best way off under the circumstances. It took only a moment to recoil the rope, and we were flying down the glacier in the gathering twilight. We noticed a huge stone shoot down the couloir so decided we had probably chosen the best way off under the circumstances.
-About a quarter hour from the bergscbrund we noticed the real track coming down on our right. It must have wandered across the loos rock cliff from the Col du Lion. We then met two jovial Italian guide, carrying enormous loads. They were going to join with the Swiss guide, the following day in a memorial service to Otto Tuhrer. We have heard recently that another guide was killed because of a breaking rope. Ohwell, more memorial services and plaques. + 
-Down to the hut of the Duke D'Abbruzzi in cloying mist a bit travelworn but very happy to have savoured the delights of the famous peak. We had considered pushing an over the Purg Joch in an attempt to reach Zermatt that evening or the following morning. The prospect of getting caught out on the glacier didn't seem to appal us as much as it did the hut proprietor who insisted on our staying the night, and finished up bringing his fee down to half-price. This was capital clean sheets and good food instead of dates and rock shelter jolly good. We were also amazed at the attention and meals received that +About a quarter hour from the bergscbrund we noticed the real track coming down on our right. It must have wandered across the loose rock cliff from the Col du Lion. We then met two jovial Italian guides carrying enormous loads. They were going to join with the Swiss guides the following day in a memorial service to Otto Tuhrer. We have heard recently that another guide was killed because of a breaking rope. Oh well, more memorial services and plaques. 
-9. + 
-night. Haggling over prices earns respect from all Continentals, so it seems. +Down to the hut of the Duke D'Abbruzzi in cloying mist a bit travel worn but very happy to have savoured the delights of the famous peak. We had considered pushing on over the Furg Joch in an attempt to reach Zermatt that evening or the following morning. The prospect of getting caught out on the glacier didn't seem to appeal us as much as it did the hut proprietor who insisted on our staying the night, and finished up bringing his fee down to half-price. This was capital clean sheets and good food instead of dates and rock shelter jolly good. We were also amazed at the attention and meals received that night. Haggling over prices earns respect from all Continentals, so it seems. 
-The following day we wandered up to the Furg Joch, ambled across the Theodule glacier with its delightful panoramas, then down a windir4 track to Zermatt and the flesh pots. The most famous peak of them all had been conquered. We were supremely happy. + 
-(AAbseiling is a method of descendfng by virtually sitting in a loop of the rope, which is slung loosr;ly over a projection, the climber allowing the free end to pass through his legs and hands, so controlling his speed of descent.) +The following day we wandered up to the Furg Joch, ambled across the Theodule glacier with its delightful panoramas, then down a winding track to Zermatt and the flesh pots. The most famous peak of them all had been conquered. We were supremely happy. 
-MORE INFLATION.+ 
 +(Abseiling is a method of descendfng by virtually sitting in a loop of the rope, which is slung loosely over a projection, the climber allowing the free end to pass through his legs and hands, so controlling his speed of descent.) 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====More Inflation.===== 
 By "Crikey". By "Crikey".
 +
 Inflation has been a ready-made subject for the financial critics and a lot of space has been devoted in the newspaper advertisements to inflation as a means of making prominent objects more prominent: but we noticed a different slant in an overseas magazine. The U.S. firm of B.F. Goodrich has developed a tent capable of accommodating 100 men, and which is made in eight sections joined up by 320 feet of zipper. There are no tent poles. Built-in air pockets are inflated into ribs and the whole can be erected in six minutes, the ribs being sufficiently rigid to maintain the walls without poles. Inflation has been a ready-made subject for the financial critics and a lot of space has been devoted in the newspaper advertisements to inflation as a means of making prominent objects more prominent: but we noticed a different slant in an overseas magazine. The U.S. firm of B.F. Goodrich has developed a tent capable of accommodating 100 men, and which is made in eight sections joined up by 320 feet of zipper. There are no tent poles. Built-in air pockets are inflated into ribs and the whole can be erected in six minutes, the ribs being sufficiently rigid to maintain the walls without poles.
-This brings us to the point where we can visualise some day our l'Paddymade tents being constructed on a somewhat igloo pattern, with built-in ribs of plastic tubing, and a featherweight pump to supply the necessary rigidity. A hollow rib at either end, and one in the centre, with a long one to form a back-bone on the ridge, all interconnected to the latter, might prove a practical idea. One peg for each corner only would save weight. The igloo would provide more elbow rcanwhen one was confined during rain. Again, the tent could be moved holus-bolus at will to gain the shade of a tree or to beat a retreatfrom the chronic snorer next-door. And, last but not least, what fun could be had with a sharp Din!:+ 
 +This brings us to the point where we can visualise some day our "Paddymadetents being constructed on a somewhat igloo pattern, with built-in ribs of plastic tubing, and a featherweight pump to supply the necessary rigidity. A hollow rib at either end, and one in the centre, with a long one to form a back-bone on the ridge, all interconnected to the latter, might prove a practical idea. One peg for each corner only would save weight. The igloo would provide more elbow room when one was confined during rain. Again, the tent could be moved holus-bolus at will to gain the shade of a tree or to beat a retreat from the chronic snorer next-door. And, last but not least, what fun could be had with a sharp pin!
 A late suggestion has come in that wind from general meetings may be bottled in aluminium containers and issued free to the owners of pneumatic tents. A late suggestion has come in that wind from general meetings may be bottled in aluminium containers and issued free to the owners of pneumatic tents.
-.saMI,IYOMI.M.1.1.111.11 + 
-You lucky people don't knowhow close you were to getting a magazine of 19i pages last month. On second thoughts, seeing whose item was on the bottom of page 11, you may have been lucky to escape it. Anyway, as Brian picked up the stencil, it "just cane apart in his bands". Horror, panic - but by happy circumstance Ken Meadows and car were there: Brian was whisked back to his office, with a blank wax sheet, while the rest of the production team sweated over the damaged stencil and finally fixed it to the duplicator (mostly +---- 
-with ink and faith). By whidh time the production expert was back with a new bottom half (of the stencil, we mean) - and the presses rolled again. + 
-10.+You lucky people don't know how close you were to getting a magazine of 19 1/2 pages last month. On second thoughts, seeing whose item was on the bottom of page 11, you may have been lucky to escape it. Anyway, as Brian picked up the stencil, it "just came apart in his bands". Horror, panic - but by happy circumstance Ken Meadows and car were there: Brian was whisked back to his office, with a blank wax sheet, while the rest of the production team sweated over the damaged stencil and finally fixed it to the duplicator (mostly with ink and faith). By which time the production expert was back with a new bottom half (of the stencil, we mean) - and the presses rolled again. 
 + 
 +---- 
 FOR WE OURSELVES HAVE SAID IT FOR WE OURSELVES HAVE SAID IT
 01....1%MNI,111110.11 MIIISLY14,17.11...1111040 11 WeavilION.INA1 01....1%MNI,111110.11 MIIISLY14,17.11...1111040 11 WeavilION.INA1
195311.txt · Last modified: 2016/11/29 12:42 by tyreless