User Tools

Site Tools


195505

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
Last revision Both sides next revision
195505 [2016/01/28 09:26]
tyreless
195505 [2016/01/28 15:32]
tyreless
Line 76: Line 76:
 The President announced that there would be a joint instructional walk, corroboree and working bee at Bluegum Forest on 14th and 15th May, also a small operetta. This announcement brought "General Business" to a close at 9.40 p.m. The President announced that there would be a joint instructional walk, corroboree and working bee at Bluegum Forest on 14th and 15th May, also a small operetta. This announcement brought "General Business" to a close at 9.40 p.m.
  
-AUSTRALIA MY STUDIO+=====Australia My Studio===== 
 - Ray Bean - Ray Bean
-That little black box, the camera, to most people seems to have about it an air of mystery: just what is the darned thing going to produce next? So it has always been with me. Even though I use it with calculated exactitude which the necessity of making a living demands, I still treat the thing with a certain amount of distrust. Howevtr, it has not been unkind, and has taken an the guise of a passport to distant places  a magic carpet to Australia's vast spaces as it were. Which is how I came to be at Halls Creek in the Kimberleys, Western Australia, and there thinking of-Bush Walkers. + 
-4. +That little black box, the camera, to most people seems to have about it an air of mystery: just what is the darned thing going to produce next? So it has always been with me. Even though I use it with calculated exactitude which the necessity of making a living demands, I still treat the thing with a certain amount of distrust. However, it has not been unkind, and has taken an the guise of a passport to distant places  a magic carpet to Australia's vast spaces as it were. Which is how I came to be at Halls Creek in the Kimberleys, Western Australia, and there thinking of Bush Walkers. 
-I had just come over the Turkey Creek Road. You don't know it? I almost wish I didn't! I runs, or perhaps I should say hops, skips and jumps from Wyndham to Halls Creek, and a more cussed.journey it would be hard to find in Austiialia. There are a few cattle stations along its three hundred miles, and if the cattle feed on spinifex and gibbers they must thrive. One stations uses camels to muster the cattle, and as cattle country I think that is all the description necessary. + 
-Outside the Kimberley Hotel sat an old-timer gazing down Halls Creek's main and only street. His eyes seemed to be closed, as are +I had just come over the Turkey Creek Road. You don't know it? I almost wish I didn't! I runs, or perhaps I should say hops, skips and jumps from Wyndham to Halls Creek, and a more cussed journey it would be hard to find in Australia. There are a few cattle stations along its three hundred miles, and if the cattle feed on spinifex and gibbers they must thrive. One station uses camels to muster the cattle, and as cattle country I think that is all the description necessary. 
-the eyes of most of these people who have lived a lifetime in the glax,of this arid land. There was nothing in the street except two donkey% and a native in the distance, which for Halls Creek was a crowd scene. I got yarning with the old fellow and told him I had just came down from Wyndham. I cussed the frightful condition of the road and marvelled at the fact that the road was originally made by teamsters from Wyndham bringing in waggons of supplies drawn by donkeys. Haw they ever found their way through the maze of gullies and flat-topped residuals, I said, was a mystery and a tribute to the Australian pioneers. How they survived the heat and lack of water, the ruts, gibbers and sand was more than I could understand. + 
-The old-timer let me have my say, and then he snorted a snort worthy of any pig. "'Young man, he said, when we prospectors came in we brought our supplies with us down that same road - pushed in fro': of us in a wheel-barrow' +Outside the Kimberley Hotel sat an old-timer gazing down Halls Creek's main and only street. His eyes seemed to be closed, as are the eyes of most of these people who have lived a lifetime in the glare of this arid land. There was nothing in the street except two donkeys and a native in the distance, which for Halls Creek was a crowd scene. I got yarning with the old fellow and told him I had just came down from Wyndham. I cussed the frightful condition of the road and marvelled at the fact that the road was originally made by teamsters from Wyndham bringing in waggons of supplies drawn by donkeys. How they ever found their way through the maze of gullies and flat-topped residuals, I said, was a mystery and a tribute to the Australian pioneers. How they survived the heat and lack of water, the ruts, gibbers and sand was more than I could understand. 
-They did too! But why a wheel-barrow? Of all methods of carryin things I can't see that a whel-barrow could have any advantage over anything. Around the garden, perhaps, but even then I could never keep the thingtalanced and generally emptied the contents on to the strawberry bed. But with the need for keeping both hands occupied while the flies are crawling over your face, with the temperature well over a hundred in the shade - if there were any shade in this -treeless place - and on this road; MD, I can't see it. + 
-That was in the days w1e71 coastal boats brought the supplies to the port at Wyndham, and donkey teams of up to seventy-eight beasts hauled loaded waggons down that primitive road. Recently a man wandered into Thangool homestead just south of Broome and asked for water to fill his waterbag. The station owner was amazed that someone should approach his place without him hearing the car engine. The wanderer said that he had no car, he was pushing a wheelbarrow. He. had come from Broome and was facing the great sandy stretch of"roadh which runs parallel to the Ninety Mile Beach where the great central Australian desert continues westward right to the sea. Even at this stage of the station owner's story I knew what the tragic end would be; I was facing this road for the second time, having come over it on the upward journey, and not with a wheelbarrow but with a modern utility truck carrying"my own provisions and water supply. They did their best at Thangoolr but nothing would persuade this nomad that hiL venture was impossible; even should he make the distance between tank before the sun struck him down, the water was not always drinkable. They found him in the scant shade of a beefwood tree, his barrow with +The old-timer let me have my say, and then he snorted a snort worthy of any pig. "Young man, he said, when we prospectors came in we brought our supplies with us down that same road - pushed in front of us in a wheel-barrow!" 
-its silly six inch diameter wheel long since abandoned.+ 
 +They did too! But why a wheel-barrow? Of all methods of carrying things I can't see that a wheel-barrow could have any advantage over anything. Around the garden, perhaps, but even then I could never keep the thing balanced and generally emptied the contents on to the strawberry bed. But with the need for keeping both hands occupied while the flies are crawling over your face, with the temperature well over a hundred in the shade - if there were any shade in this treeless place - and on this road; no, I can't see it. 
 + 
 +That was in the days when coastal boats brought the supplies to the port at Wyndham, and donkey teams of up to seventy-eight beasts hauled loaded waggons down that primitive road. Recently a man wandered into Thangool homestead just south of Broome and asked for water to fill his waterbag. The station owner was amazed that someone should approach his place without him hearing the car engine. The wanderer said that he had no car, he was pushing a wheelbarrow. He. had come from Broome and was facing the great sandy stretch of"road" which runs parallel to the Ninety Mile Beach where the great central Australian desert continues westward right to the sea. Even at this stage of the station owner's story I knew what the tragic end would be; I was facing this road for the second time, having come over it on the upward journey, and not with a wheelbarrow but with a modern utility truck carrying my own provisions and water supply. They did their best at Thangool, but nothing would persuade this nomad that his venture was impossible; even should he make the distance between tanks before the sun struck him down, the water was not always drinkable. They found him in the scant shade of a beefwood tree, his barrow with its silly six inch diameter wheel long since abandoned.
 We also asked for water at Thangool, not so much to fill our water bag (an eighteen gallon tank built into the truck), as to soak the hessian that I had laid under the floor mat and poked in around the clutch and brake pedals to keep out the choking dust as fine as talc that comes up in a cloud behind the truck and works its way into every crack of the truck body. We also asked for water at Thangool, not so much to fill our water bag (an eighteen gallon tank built into the truck), as to soak the hessian that I had laid under the floor mat and poked in around the clutch and brake pedals to keep out the choking dust as fine as talc that comes up in a cloud behind the truck and works its way into every crack of the truck body.
-Setting off from the station on to the terrible road the mirage mocked at us as it twisted and waved the landscape around in front of us like a nightmare; the horizon out in the direction of Roebuck Bay rose and fell in a wave-like manner until the wave crests broke away from the line and dwindled into the air like a long streamer. I found myself looking into the shadow of the occasional tree, half expecting to see there the body of some hapless barrowlousher. Soon there are no trees, and there settles over eVeryone in the truck a silence born of + 
-monotony - the heat, the dust, the everlasting plain of dried grass, +Setting off from the station on to the terrible road the mirage mocked at us as it twisted and waved the landscape around in front of us like a nightmare; the horizon out in the direction of Roebuck Bay rose and fell in a wave-like manner until the wave crests broke away from the line and dwindled into the air like a long streamer. I found myself looking into the shadow of the occasional tree, half expecting to see there the body of some hapless barrow-pusher. Soon there are no trees, and there settles over everyone in the truck a silence born of 
-a left-over from the last nwet. Suddenly there! Looks a cat! Out hero on this near desert we saw many ordinary domestic cats, hundreds of miles from any dwelling and many generations removed from domesticity; probably living on small birds - there seems to be no other sign of life, not even rabbits - and water - there are windmills and water +monotony - the heat, the dust, the everlasting plain of dried grass, a left-over from the last "wet". Suddenly there! Look! A cat! Out here on this near desert we saw many ordinary domestic cats, hundreds of miles from any dwelling and many generations removed from domesticity; probably living on small birds - there seems to be no other sign of life, not even rabbits - and water - there are windmills and water tanks along the sandhills at the back of the beach, for sheep are pastured on the one mile strip of coastal plain between the desert and the sea. 
-tanks along the sandhills at the back of the beach, for sheep are + 
-pastured on the one mile strip of coastal plain between the desert and the sea. +And so this story has to end somehow. Well, it was the barrow-pushers that made me think of Bushwalkers, (not that I don't think of them often - lonely campfires at night have induced a nostalgic yearning for the companionship of many). I can understand the old hands not using a rucksac in their unenlightened age, but why a wheelbarrow? 
-And so this story has to end somehow. Well, it was the barrow- + 
-pushers that made me think of Bushwalkers, (not that I don't think of + 
-them often - lonely campfires at night have induced a nostalgic +=====Recent addition to Club Library:===== 
-yearning for the companionship of many). I can understand the old hands not using a rucksac in their unenlightened age, but why a + 
-wheelbarrow? +===="The Mountains Of New Zealand"==== 
-SCENIC MOTOR TOURS RAILWAY STEPS, + 
-KATOOMBA. +by Rodney Hewitt and Mavis Davidson. 
-DAILY TOURS BY PARLOR COACH TO THE WORLD FAMOUS JENOLAN CAVES AND ALL BLUE MOUNTAIN SIGHTS. + 
-FOR ALL INFORMATION +This magnificently illustrated book embraces the entire peak country of both Nth. and Sth. Islands of New Zealand. To anyone planning a mountaineering trip to the Dominion it would prove invaluable. It gives the name and height of every peak, means of access, huts available to climbers, tramping, mountaineering and ski clubs to contact in each district, as well as interesting historical facts relating to each mountain described. It is strongly recommended as reading to anyone planning a visit, or better still, a copy in the pocket of your pack. (Copies available from Angus & Robertson). 
-WRITE TO P.O. BOX 60, KATOOMBA TELEPHONE 60, KATOOMBA. + 
-6. +=====The Arthur Ranges, New Zealand Easter 1953.===== 
-Recent addition to Club Library: + 
-"TEE MOUNTAINS OF NEW ZEALANDby +- Geoff Broadhead. 
-Rodney Hewitt and Mavis Davidson. + 
-This magnificently illustrated book embraces the entire peak country of both Nth. and 5th. Islands of New Zealand. To anyone planning a mountaineering trip to the Dominion it would prove invaluable. It gives the name and height of every peak, means of access, +The night was still, humid enough to carry the smell of ripening fruit and tobacco, with the low moon shining down between dissolving banks of cloud. Small pebbles gave way to soft, silencing dust on the slow, ascending road. My mind turned to thoughts of the previous weeks. I'd been tobacco picking at Riwaka in the Nelson District of New Zealand's South Island, and a chance conversation with a local chap had led to plans for this - Easter 1953. Barry had been tramping in the Mount Arthur Ranges before, and his tales aroused my imagination. 
-huts available to climbers, tramping, mountaineering and ski clubs + 
-to contact in each district, as well as interesting historical facts relating to each mountain described. It is strongly recommended as reading to anyone planning a visit, or better still, a copy in the pocket of your pack. (Copies available from Angus & Robertson). +Finishing work on the tobacco farm on the Thursday afternoon, and after an early evening meal, we walked into Matueka, spent an hour or so in idle gossip with friends in the night shopping crowd till our bus was ready to leave for Ngatimato, which was the terminus. A nine mile road walk still lay before us as our destination for the night was Pokororo. The road meandered, crossing and recrossing the side rivers flowing into the Wangapeka River, which is one of those rivers that astound Australians, being very wide and fast when up, yet no  more when low than a trickling stream among the shingle beds and banks. We followed one of these side rivers up, passing many small farms, till about 12 p.m, when we reached the appointed area. The relief of dumping our rucksacks was exceeded only by the speed at which we put up the tent and retired, an occasional splatter of rain reminding of the low clouds
-THE ARTHUR RANGES NEW ZEALAND EASTER 1953. + 
-- Geoff Broadhead. The night was still, humid enough to carry the smell of ripening +A pleasant surprise awaited us in the morning. Our tent had been pitched on a grassy river bank - the river swift and clear tumbling over smooth water-worn rocks. The background to the tent was wild briars and vines, bushes in autumnal dress of golden yellow ocres, burnt siennas and reds ranging through to scarlet-tipped leaves and berries. In the taller trees bell birds predominated, and the staple breakfast of porridge, bacon and fried Rye-Vitas was a very pleasant affair. Passing the last farm we called in and spent a few minutes chatting with the farmer's wife, an interesting woman who told us of the early days when supplies and food were packed in by horse to the gold fields on the West Coast, over the Arthurs and down the Karamea River, part of the track we would follow now. 
-fruit and tobacco, with the low moon shining down between dissolving + 
-bank t of cloud. Small pebbles gave way to soft, silencing dust on thc,, slow,'ascending road. My mind turned to thoughts of the previous weeks. I'd been tobacco picking at Riwaka in the Nelson District of +The track was, in width and grade, similar to the Six-Foot track as it rises from the Cox River. Leaving the farmland, the height a few hundred feet above the sea, we followed the track as it wound up around the ridges. Below on the right, with the fern-covered hillside dropping steeply to the shingle-bed river, we saw sheep grazing, gradually thinning in number as we ascended. The vegetation was changing from the open farmland through ferns, shrubs and small timber to the heavier beech and myrtle forest near the saddle. The heavy rains which fall from the Nor'westers on the West Coast make for a thicker, tall, luxuriant vegetation than is to be found inland, and the closer we drew to Flora Saddle the steadier the rain beat down. Passing over the saddle, with not even a view greeting us as consolation for our 3 1/2 thousand foot climb, we were glad to descend to Flora Hut for a rest, food, and a smoke. The rain eased off to a drizzling mist, driven by a cool wind. 
-New Zealand's South Island, and a chance conversation with a local + 
-chap had led to plans for this - Easter 1953. Barry had been tramp in the Mount Arthur Ranges before, and his tales aroused my imagination. +Flora Hut is set in a grassy clearing, surrounded by beech forest with small creeks running either side of it, the clearing being at the foot of a spur. All the huts in the area were built by the Nelson Tramping Club assisted by a £1 for £1 Government grant, which is an excellent idea in a country where huts are needed, Club enthusiasm high but Club funds low. All the huts we stayed in were of the same design: rectangular, divided into 3 sections, either end being living quarters and the centre kept for horses and firewood, the latter being an important item. Fuel is very scarce, green timber rotting as soon as it falls. Wet rot is very prevalent as in all places with a high rainfall. Building materials used for the huts is rough hewn wood slabs and orange painted iron sheeting. 
-Finishing work on the tobaoco farm on the Thursday afternoon, + 
-and after an early evening meal, we walked into Matueka, spent an hour +After a luncheon respite from the drizzling mist we started towards Salesbury Hut which was on the plateau. Our track first went to a river junction then rose to the snowgrass plateau. The walking that afternoon was enjoyable, even with the drizzling rain. The track was inches deep with decaying leaves, small and softening to the footsteps. Lining either side of the track were beech and myrtle forest but not much undergrowth, the deer population keeping it down. From 
-or so in idle gossip with friends in the night shopping crowd till 0= bus was ready to leave for Ngatimato, which was the terminus. A nine +tree-trunks and branches hung thin greyish-green tendrils of thin-fibred moss, and green and white lichen clung to the trunks. The smell of damp rich earth arose through the drizzling mist. 
-mile road walk still lay before ut as our destination for the night was Pokororo. The road meandered, crossing and recrossing the side + 
-rivers flaming into the Wangapeka River, which is one of those rivers that astound Australians, being very wide and fast when up, yet no more when low than a trickling stream among the shingle beds and bank3 +We were walking parallel with Flora Creek, the water level rising swiftly owing to the heavier rains higher on the range. Passing two or three derelict one-roomed huts, we started ascending Salesbury Hut track. Writhing mist and cloud, reminiscent of the Blue Mountains, replaced the drizzle. Bird life became noticable, the Most insistent being the riflemen, little tubby bundles about 1 1/4" long, lime green, with a call like tinkling bell. About 20 of these small birds kept with us for miles, darting ahead, turning the walk into a Roman 
-We followed one of these side rivers up, passing many small farms, till about 12 p.m, when we reached the =Pointed area. The relief of +triumph. Keeping up a medium steady pace (being too chilly to have many smokes), we arrived at Salesbury Hut by 7.15. It is built on snow-grass country, the orange-ochre colour showing prominently among the thigh-high clumps of yellowing snow tussock. The tussock extended over the floor of this very shallow valley with beech forest running in a strip on either side. 
-dumping our rucksacks was exceeded only by the speed at which we pup + 
-up the tent and retired, an occasional splatter of rain reminding of the low clouds, +We reached the hut to find one half occupied, a few distant rifle shots telling us where the inhabitants were. The twilight faded, and feeling hungry we lit the fire. Unfortunately the chimney faced into the wind, with the draught coming down, and before long the room was full of smoke, making conditions uncomfortable. With the door open it became too cold. Just as we'd finished eating, the other two bods from the hut returned and called in for a cuppa, carrying a leg of venison. They'd just shot a 3-year old stag and kindly gave us a few pounds to supplement our food ration. It is a dark red neat, with a 
-A pleasant surprise awaited us in the morning. Our tent had +deceptively smooth texture. Being warm, the steam rose in the cold air as Barry carved. 
-been pitched on a grassy river bank - the river swift and clear + 
-tumbling over smooth water-worn rocks. The background to the tent was wild briars and vines, bushes in autumnal dress of golden yellow +Next day, with the same weather, we decided to have a day trip from the hut and visit some caves that were marked on the mapBefore long we were on the plateau, crossing it till we reached a maze of small steep gullies and thickly wooded ridges. An air of unreality pervaded all, the mist reducing visibility among the beech trees with their hanging moss-fronds. The tussock, swollen by the rain, was almost swampy. The first cave, (all at the head of gullies), wasn'much more than an underground stream, the floor and walls covered in thick grey mud. More rewarding was the next cave, two tunnels leading from a main chamber, but both blocked by rock falls after a hundred yards or soComing out we surprised a fallow doe grazing on the edge of a beech groveThe final cave visited was about a mile off, the entrance small, opening into a chamber about 40 or 50 feet high, roughly the same in depth, and about 100 yards wide, covered mostly with living lime stone and a variety of formations, including some magnificent columns. Near the back were iron-tinted shawls. The limestone looked coarse, maybe the sign of rapid growth. The only passage off was a river cave which we followed for approximately 1/4 mile, disappearing over a waterfall. Not having much faith in our one torch we came back to the open. 
-ocres, burnt siennas and reds ranging through to scarlet-tipped  + 
-leaves and berries. In the taller trees bell birds predominated, +After a quick lunch we climbed the open tussock slopes up from the caveQuickly a light breeze blew, scattered the mist away, and our reward at last! Mt. Arthur and its companion, the double-headed mountain "The Twins" were directly opposite, separated from us by a narrow deep river valley, the Karamea. The overwhelming impression was of a huge face dropping into the valley, with the mountains rising 4,000 feet at a steep angle. We stood for minutes just watching, till a Government deer-culler came in view on our left. We spent a few minutes talking and found out a little of New Zealand's deer problem. It's comparable with Australia's rabbit problem, both animals aiding erosion. The deer (and there are millions spread over 6 or 7 species), strip the young trees of bark and the undergrowth, leaving the ground bare. With the heavy rainfall the ground erodes quickly, silting up the wide rivers. Another introduced animal which has raised the sane problem is the possum. 
-and the staple breakfast of porridge, bacon and fried Rye-Vitas was + 
-a very pleasant affair. Passing the last farm we called in and speni a few minutes chatting with the farmer's wife, an interesting woman +Losing a little height we walked to Balloon Hut, crossing small beech groves and patches of open tussock. Parties come here in winter for skiing, the open, rounded terrain to the west resembling the N.S.W. Alps, although access must be difficult. Returning we surprised a few deer and heard many stags "roaring." Easter time is the mating season; stags give voice with a sound resembling a roar, its main purpose being to attract the does to his harem. Often a young stag accepts the roar as a challenge and gives battle. For some reason the stag loses much of his fear for militant humans, and this is the deer culler's most profitable period. Throughout the day we'd heard the roaring, some quite close to the hut, especially at dusk. 
-7. + 
-who told us of the early days when supplies and food were packed in by horse to the gold fields on the West Coast, over the Arthurs and down the Karamea River, part of the track we would follow now. +The evening was late by the time we returned to Salesbury Hut. While getting some firewood from one of the groves to replenish the dried wood we'd used, our attention was attracted (or maybe the reverse) by a weka or woodhen, a bird related to both the kiwi and the re-discovered notorni. The weka is a very inquisitive bird; it will come within a few feet and raise one eye quizzicly. Our bird may have had its confidence misplaced at one time, as one leg was missing. We had it as a constant companion, finally following us to the hut door and becoming quite dejected after being deprived of items like our tin plates and cutlery with which it tried to make off. Later we were informed they have a reputation for acquiring brightly coloured or shiny articles. 
-The track was, in width and grade, similar to the Six-Foot track as it rises from the Cox River. Leaving the farmland, the height a few hundred feet above the sea, we followed the track as it wound up around the ridges. Below on the right, with the fern-covered hillside dropping steeply to the shingle-bed river, we saw sheep grazing, + 
-gradually thinning in number as we ascended. The vegetation was changing from the open farmland through ferns, shrubs and small timber to the heavier beech and myrtle forest near the saddle. The heavy rains which fall from the Norfwesters on the West Coast make for a thicker, tall, luxuriant vegetation than is to be found inland, and the closer we drew to Flora Saddle the steadier the rain beat down. Passing over the saddle, with not even a view greeting us as consolation for our I thouand foot climb, we were glad to descend to Flora Hut for a rest, food, and a smoke. The rain eased off to a drizzling mist, driven by a cool wind. +The venison we dried, fried in small cubes with onion rings, and after our long day it wasn't long before sleep came. We woke in the morning to frost and a clear sunny day. Leaving the hut by 7.30 we started towards Mt. Arthur, following a disced track through beech forest to Gordon's Pyramid, a steep snow-grass covered hill lying this side of the saddle. The disced track is an extension of the idea of a blazed track. Blazes disappear too quickly among the fast-growing timber. The discs are made of metal (slightly smaller than a jam tin lid), generally painted white, then nailed to trees at a visible distance apart. Among the trees and undergrowth were large areas of sunken ground where the limestone beneath has collapsed, often making it necessary to detour over or under rotting timber. 
-Flora Hut is set in a grassy clearing, surrounded by beech forest with small creeks running either side of it, the clearing being at th6 foot of a spur. All the huts in the area were built by the Nelson + 
-or +The beech was replaced by tussock. Over the 2,000 ft. rise the grass, yellow ochre in the strong sun, was broken occasionally by conglomerate outcrops. From the top our view overlooked the Karamea Valley, the Cobb River with smoke lazily rising from the hydro-electricity works under construction, over to Golden Bay and Tasman Bay in the Cook Strait. The strong glare reflecting from the sea was hard on the eyes, so for relief we turned to examine the maze of ranges and peaks that were to the south. An unusual aspect of the steep grey-blue ranges was a belt of destruction caused by the earthquakes in the early 1930's. Curving in a huge S-bend, roughly two or three miles wide, the destruction was on an enormous scale; whole mountainsides had slipped, exposing unhealed scars, the millions of tons of displaced earth fanning out in the valley floors. 
-Leica films + 
- Sparkling +Following the ridge down to the saddle we sheltered under the lee away from a sharp little wind to enjoy a well earned lunch. Whilst eating, the relative quiet was shattered by a rifle report, distorted by echoes bouncing from Mt. Arthur's bluffs. Below to our right was a rich, green basin, a favourite of deer and their hunters. More shots followed in quick succession, mingled With the cries of a wild goat, and then our lunch-time quiet returned, broken only by birds and the goat's cry at lengthening intervals. 
-Prints + 
-Perfect +The ridge running up from the saddle to Mt. Arthur was narrow, ending at a rock bluff, not high but covered with spikey sub-alpine plants and loose tussock clumps, making the bluff unpleasant to overcome. With altitude gained, large areas of broken white-grey shale lay exposed among the sub-alpine vegetation. Being unable to follow the ridge owing to a series of large rock steps, we sidled upward on the eastern side of the ridge, rock hopping and scrambling, trying not to waste time as we were in shadow, with a chilly wind coming up the valley. A times a kea would wheel and glide overhead, crying out with his harsh, desolate voice - a being in full sympathy with this stark, barren home. To gain the top, we finished by going up a wide shallow gully. The rock was extremely rotten, every footstep uphill dislodged minor rock falls. For our own safety we had to climb all at the same height. Coming into the sunlight again on top, and with night not far away, we thought w'Td stop there, Being roughly 5-ish we had no alternative but to spend an uncomfortable night. Sunset and sunrise, we hoped, would compensate for being chilly for a few hours. 
-Enlargements + 
-deserve the 1 +There was quite a large area on top, slightly rounded, with snow drifts remaining from a fall of week or so earlier. Looking for a place to put up the tent I surprised a group of wild sheep in a hanging basin. They were large and extremely agile, their thick coats reaching the ground - a fortune at present prices, but hard to muster. Meeting Barry back on top we were talking about the view when a cloud came over. Looking through it at the sun we were surprised see a circular rainbow, and in the centre two shadows. Before we had time to have a good look it broke up and we turned in the opposite direction, only to see the same phenomenon in the cloud there. If we raised an arm, the corresponding figure in the circle would raise the opposite armIt lasted for about 2 minutes, and had an outsider witnessed it, the scene must have resembled physical exercises. This occurrence is uncommon, and we were extremely fortunate to see such a good example. 
-best SERVICE i + 
-PHOTOGRAPHY ! ! ? I +Mt. Arthur, just over 6,000 ft., was my first decent mountain in New Zealand from which I had a viewIn the North Island Ruapehu had been gracious, but from there the view had been limited to Mt. Egmont, everything else blanketed by thick cloud. Here was country entirely new to me, with terrain and geography constantly delighting. Close under Mt. Arthur to the east lay the fertile river flats of Nelson and Motueka - a chequered pattern of farms, draining into Tasman Bay. Behind the placid town of Nelson lay more ranges, and straining our eyes and imagination hard, could that be the tip of the North Island showing through the late afternoon haze? To the North lay Golden Bay, grey-green, and beyond that Cape Farewell and the long sand bar that's been created a bird santuary, Farewell Spit, the northernmost point of the South IslandDraining into Golden Bay were the rivers Takaka, Waingaro, Cobb and Anatoki, almost gentle valleys by comparison with western ones. To the west we were able to follow the Karama out to the coast, dipping and winding its tortuous path to the grey-gold sea lit by the setting sun. Far out to sea was a thick cloud-bank, rearing its angry height in the air. Down to the south and south-east lay our most impressive view. The Twins, the next peak in this range, had a bastion of rock bluffs either side falling steeply to deep valleys. Out plans for next morning's route on it were still undeterminedFurther down lay high range after range, snow-capped massifs reaching into the cloud, sheltering lakes and uninhabited country. Across the Wairau River lay the Inland Kiakouras, the limit for our eye-sight as they melted in the moisture-laden haze of evening. 
-You press the button, we911 do the rest ! + 
-Fii +The most urgent need now was a campsite. Between here and the Twins had to be counted out; the ground was even, but at too steep an angle for comfort. Retreating down about 20 feet we found a small tarn formed by the melting snow. Water - one point in its favour, and luckily a small flat area, slightly sheltered from the wind. Through an oversight we were without tent poles so, to serve a double purpose, we constructed a rock wall both as protection from the wind, which was very strong by now, and as something to tie the tent to. Barry crawled into his sleeping bag, then into the tent, holding it up whilst I lashed our tomahawk to his Yukon-type rucksack, making our second tent-pole. Makeshift, yes; but to our delight they held well. Entrance was gained by pulling but a couple of the side pegs and crawling under. Ravenously hungry, we settled for a meal of salami, scroggen, honey and thickly buttered Rye-Vitas. We peeped out of the doorway before settling to sleep. Our sunset was wondrousThe cloud-bank was approaching in over the West Coast, rich fiery colours glowing from the angry clouds. Ah! to have known then what to expect from New Zealand weather! The wind rose in volume, but we were too tired to listen long and slept well. 
-negran Your - -411$-A - + 
-ek +The morning confirmed our fears. Thick swirling mist, driven by a high wind, put out of the question all thought of the Twins, so we packed up and left quickly, forcing down more honey and Rye-Vitas as breakfast. Finding our way to the right ridge was awkward. The evening before we had taken a very good survey, but as we had a choice with many spurs running off each, we weren't certain of it. The mist reduced visibility to about 15 ft. and even our compass behaved erratically. Barry found a rough cairn, making us both happier, and after some cautious travelling we found another. Our track was now down, over rock, greasy with moisture, across shingle fans when we left the ridge in order to pass bluffs, till we were travelling down over swampy tussock. Soon an occasional stunted tree appeared. It had taken 2 1/2 hours to reach tree level, and we were glad of the shelter from the wind and driven rain. Now the path was a muddy track, rivulets dropping and damming behind tree-trunks. Cabbage-trees
-v Xfr +
-Developing Rollfilms +
-LEICA PHOTO SERVICE +
-31 Macquarie Place +
-SYDNEY N.S.W. +
-8. +
-Tramping Club assisted by a for Government grant, which is an excellent idea in a country where huts are needed, Club enthusiasm high but Club funds low. All the huts we stayed in were of the same design: rectangular, divided into 3 sections, either end being living quarters and the centre kept for horses and firewood, the latter being an important item. Fuel is very scarce, green timber rotting as soon as it falls. Wet rot is very prevalent as in all places with a high rainfall. Building materials used for the huts is rough hewn wood slabs and orange painted iron sheeting. +
-After a luncheon respite from the drizzling mist we started +
-towards Salesbury Hut which was on the plateau. Our track first went +
-to a river junction then rose to the snowgrass plateau. The walking that afternoon was enjoyable, even with the drizzling rain. The trac:1, was inches deep with decaying leaves, small and softening to the foot- +
-steps. Lining either side of the track were beech and myrtle forest +
-but not much undergrowth, the deer population keeping it down. From +
-tree-trunks and branches hung thin greyish-green tendrils of thinfibred moss, and green and white lichen clung to the trunks. The smell of damp rich earth arose through the drizzling mist. +
-We were walking parallel with Flora Creek, the water level risin, +
-swiftly owing to the heavier rains higher on the range. Passing two or three delelict one-roomed huts, we started ascending Salesbury Hut track. Writhing mist and cloud, reminiscent of the Blue Mountains, replaced the drizzle. Bird life became noticable, the Most insistent being the riflemen, little tubby bundles about li" long, lime green, with a call like el. tinkling bell. About 20 of these small birds kept +
-with us for miles, darting ahead, turning the walk into a Roman +
-triumph. Keeping up a medium steady pace (being too chilly to have many smokes), we al,rived at Salesbury Hut by 7.15. It is built on snow-grass country, the orange-ochre colour showing prominently among the thilhigh clumps of yellowing snow tussock. The tussock entende over the floor of this very shallow valley with beech forest running in a strip on either side. +
-We reached the hut to find one half occupied, a few distant rif2- +
-shots telling us where the inhabitants were. The twilight faded, and feeling hungry we lit the fire. Unfortunately the chimney faced into +
-the wind, with the draught coming down, and before long the room was +
-full of smoke, making conditions uncomfortable. With the door openit became too cold. Just as we'd finished eating, the other two bods +
-from the hut returned and called in for a cuppa, carrying a leg of +
-venison. They'd just shot a 3-year old stag and kindly gave'us a fell', pounds to suppliment our food ration. It is a dark red neat, with a +
-deceptively smooth texture. Being warm, the steam rose in the cold +
-air as Barry carved. +
-Next day, with the same weather, we decided to have a day trip +
-from the hut and visit some caves that were marked on the manBefor long we were on the plateau, crossing it till we reached a maze of +
-small steep gullies and thickly wooded ridges. An air of unreality Pervaded all, the mist reducing visibility among the beech trees with +
-their hanging mss-fronds. The tussock, swollen by the rain, was +
-almost swampy. The first cave, (all at the head of gullies), +
-9. +
-wasntt much more than an underground stream, the floor and walls covered in thick grey mud. More rewarding was the next cave, two tunnels leading from a main chamber, but both blocked by rock falls after a hundred yards or soComing out we surprised a fallow doe grazing on the edge of a beech groveThe final cave visited was about a mile off, the entrance small, opening into a chamber about 40 or 50 feet high, roughly the same in depth, and about 100 yards wide, covered mostly with living lime stone and a variety of formations, including some magnificent columns. 'Near the back were iron- tinted shawls. The limestone looked coarse, maybe the sign of rapid growth. The only pasage off was a river cave which we followed for approximately mile, disappearing over a waterfall. Not having me faith in our one torch we came back to the open. +
-After a quick lunch we climbed the open tussock slopes up from the caveQuickly a light breeze blew, scattered'the mist away, and our reward at last! Mt. Arthur and its companion, the double-headed mountain The Twins" were directly opposite, separated from LIB by a narrow deep river valley, the Karamea. The overwhelming impression was of a'huge face dropping into the valley, with the mountains rising 4,000 feet at a steep angle. We stood for minutes just watcl ing, till a Government deer-culler came in view on our left. We spent a few minutes talking and found out a little of New Zealand's deer problem. It's comparable with Australia's rabbit problem, both animals aiding erosion. The deer (and there are millions spread +
-IMPORTANT  TRANSPORT  NOTICE. +
-B U.SHWALKERS REQUIRING TRANSPORT FROM.BLACKHEATH.   ANY HOUR +
-T\1_'p.,_:wTJT__E OR CALL .   +
-SIEDLECKY'S TAXI AND TOURIST SERVICE, 116 STATION STREET BLACKHEATH. +
-24 HOUR V ICE +
-BUSHWALKERS arriving at Blackheath late at night without transport booking can ring for car from Railway Station or call at above address -- IT'S NEVER TOO LATE! +
-YmmINLEIN +
-'PHONE BIHEATH 81 or 146. LOOK FOR CARS T03210 or TV270. OR BOOK AT MARK SALON RADIO SHOP - OPP. STATION. +
-10. +
-over 6 or 7 species), strip the young trees of bark and the undergrowth, leaving the ground bare. With the heavy rainfall the ground erodes quickly, silting up the wide rivers. Another introduced animal which has raised the sane problem is the possum. +
-Losing a little height we walked to Balloon Hut, crossing small beech groves and patches of open tussock. Parties cone here in wintel, for skiing, the open, rounded terrain to the west resembling the N.S.Ir. Alps, although access must be difficult. Returning we surprised a few deer and heard many stags "roaring." Easter time is-the mating +
-season; stags give voice with a sound resembling a roar, its main +
-Purpose being to attract the does to his harem. Aften a young stag accents the roar as a challenge and gives battle. For some reason the stag loses much of his fear for militant humans, and this is the deer +
-culler's most profitable period. Throughout the day we'd heard the +
-roaring, some quite close to the hut, especially at dusk. +
-The evening was late by the time we returned to Salesbury Hut. While getting some firewood from one of the groves to replenish the dried wood we'd used, our attention was attracted (or maybe the +
-reverse) by a weka or woodhen, a bird related to both the kiwi and the re-discovered notorni. The weka is a very inquisitive bird; it will come within a few feet and raise one eye quizicly. Our bird may have had its confidence misplaced at one time, as one leg was missing. We had it as a constant companion, finally following us to +
-the hut door and becoming quite dejected after being deprived of items +
-like our tin plates and cutlery with which it tried to make off. Later we were informed they have a reputation for acquiring brightly +
-coloured or shiny articles. +
-The venison we dried, fried in small cubes with onion rings, and after our long day it wasn't long before sleep came. We woke in the morning to frost and a clear sunny day. Leaving the hut by 7.30 we started towards Mt. Arthur, following a disced track through beech forest to Gordon's Pyramid, a steep snow-grass covered hill lying thic side of the saddle. The disced track is an extension of the idea of a blazed track. Blazes disappear too quickly among the fast-growing timber. The discs are made of metal (slightly smaller than a jam tin lid), generally painted white, then nailed to trees at a visible +
-distance apart. Among the trees and undergrowth were large areas of +
-sunken ground where the limestone beneath has collapsed, often making it necessary to detour over or under rotting timber. +
-The beech was replaced by tussock. Over the 2,000 ft. rise the grass, yellow ochre in the strong sun, was broken occasionally by +
-conglomerate outcrops. From the top our view overlooked the Karamea Valley, the Cobb River with smoke lazily rising from the hydro- +
-electricity works under construction, over to Golden Bay and Tasman Bay in the Cook Strait. The strong glare reflecting from the sea was hard on the eyes, so for relief we turned to examine the maze of +
-ranges and peaks that were to the south. An unusual aspect of the +
-steep grey-blue ranges w as a belt of destruction cauSed by the earthquakes in the ea:bly 1930's. Curving in a huge S-bend, roughly two or +
-three miles wide, the destruction was an an enormous scale; whole +
-mountainsides had slipped, exposing unhealed scars, the millions of +
-12+
-There was quite a large area on top, slightly rounded, with snow drifts remaining from a fall of week or so earlier. Looking for a place to put 1,110 the tent I surprised a group ofwild sheep in a hanging basin. They were large and extremely agile, their thick coats reaching the ground - a fortune at present prices, but hard to muster. Meeting Barry back on top we were talking about the view when a cloud came over. Looking through it at the sun we were surprised see a circular rainbow, and in the centre two shadows. Before we had time to have a good look it broke 1110 and we turned in the opposite direction, only to see the same phenomenon in the cloud there. If we +
-raised an arm, the corresponding figure in the circle would raise the opposite arm It lasted for about 2 minutes, and had an outsider +
-witnessed it, the scene must have resembled physical exercises. This +
-toccurrence is uncommon, and we were extremely fortunate to see such a +
-good example. +
-Mt. Arthur, just over 6,000 ft was my first decent mountain in New Zealand fi-om whichI had a viewIn the North Island Ruapehu had +
-been gracious, but from there the view had been limited to Mt. Egmont, everything else blanketed by thick cloud. Here was country entirely new to me, with terrain and geography constantly delighting. Close under Mt. Arthur to the east lay the fertile river flats of Nelson and +
-Motueka - a chequered pattern of farms, drainihg into Tasman Bay. +
-Behind the placid town of Nelson lay more ranges, and straining our eyes and imagination hard, could that be the tip of the North Island sho*ing through-the late afternoon haze? To the North lay Golden Bay, grey-green, and berond that Cape Farewell and the long sand bar that's been created a lord santuary, Farewell Spit, the northernmost point of the South IslandDraining into Golden Bay were the rivers Takaka, Waingaro, Cobb and Anatoki, almost gentle valleys by compari- +
-son with western ones. To the west we were able to follow the KartVm, out to the coast, dipping and winding its tortuous path to the grey- gold sea lit by the setting sun. Far out to sea was a thick cloud- bank, rearing its angry height in the air. Down to the south and south-east-lay our most impressive view. The Twins, the next peak in +
-this range, had a bastion of rock bluffs either side falling steeply +
-to deep valleys. Out plans for next morning's route on it were still +
-undeterminedFurther (town lay high rang after range, snow-capped massifs reaching into the cloud, sheltering lakes and uninhabited +
-country. Across the Wairau River lay the Inland Kiakouras, the limit for our eye-sight as they melted in the moisture-laden haze of evenin, +
-The most urgent need now was a campsite. BetWeen here and the +
-Twins had to be counted out; the ground was even, but at too steep an angle for comfort. Retreating down about 20 feet we found a small tarn formed by the melting snOw. Water - one point in its favour, and luckily a small flat area, slightly sheltered from the wind. Through an oversight we were without tent poles so, to serve a double purpose, we constructed a rock wall both as protection from the wind, +
-which was very strong by now, and as something to tie the tent to. Barry crawled into his sleeping bag, then into the tent, holding it up whilst I lashed our tomahawk to his Yukon-type rucksack, making +
-our Second tent-pole. Makeshift, yes; but to our delight they held well. Entrance was gained by pulling but a couple of the side pegs +
-and crawling under. Ravenously hungry, we settled for a meal of salami, scroggen, honey and thickly buttered Rye-Vitas. We peeped +
-11. +
--EEEP UP YOUR VITALITY +
-ON WALKS WITH +
-VEGETARIAN FOODS +
-CENOVIS YEAST (CONTAINS WHOLE VITAMIN B COMPLEX, ALSO D,E,F, AND H) +
-LIGHT THIN RY-KING CRISP BREAD (100% WHOLE RYE FLOUR) WELL WRAPPED IN HANDY 8 OZ. PACKET +
-BASE YOUR HOLIDAY FOOD LISTS ON WHOLESOME FOODS. +
-WIDE RANGE OF DRIED FRUITS, NUTS, BISCUITS AND DRIED FRUIT +
-SWEETS +
-FROM +
-THE SANITARIUM HEALTH FOOD SHO P, +
-13 HUNTER STREET SYDNEY. +
-tons of displaced earth fanning out in the valley floors. +
-Following the ridge down to the saddle we sheltered under the lee away from a sharp little wind to enjoy a well earned lunch. Whilst eating, the relative quiet was shattered by a rifle report, distorted by echoes bouncing from Mt. Arthurts bluffs. Below to our right was a rich, green basin, a favourite of deer and their hunters. More shots followed in quick succession, mingled With the cries of a wild goat, and then our lunch-time quiet returned, broken only by birds and the goatts cry at lengthening intervals. +
-The ridge running up from the saddle to Mt. Arthur was narrow, ending at a rock bluff, not high but covered with spikey sub-alpine plants and loose tussock clumps, making the bluff unpleasant to overcome. With altitude gained, large areas of broken white-grey shale lay exposed among the sub-alpine vegetation. Being unable to follow the ridge owing to a series of large rock steps, we sidled upward on the eastern side of the ridge, rock hopping and scrambling, trying no to waste time as we were in shadow, with a chilly wind coming WO the valley. A times a kea would wheel and glide overhead, crying out wit his harsh, desolate voice - 'a being in full sympathy with this star barren home. To gain the top, we finished by going up a wide shallow gully. The rock was extremely rotten, every footstep uphill dislodge minor rock falls. For our own safety we had to climb all at the same height. Coming into the sunlight again on top, and with night not far away, we thought weTd stop there, Being roughly 5-ish we had no alternative but to spend an uncomfortable night. Sunset and sunrise, we hoped, would compensate for being chilly for a few hourso +
-13. +
-out of the doorway before settling to sleep. Our sunset was wondrous The cloud-bank was approaching in over the West Coast, rich fiery colours glowing from the angry clouds. Ahl to have known then what to expect from New Zealand weathers The wind rose in volume, but we were too tired to listen long and slept well. +
-The morning confirmed our fears. Thick swirling mist, driven by a high wind, put out of the question all thought of the Twins, so we packed up and left quickly, forcing down more honey and Rye-Vitas as breakfast. Finding our way to the right ridge was awkward. The evening before we had taken a very good survey, but as we had a choice withmany spurs running off each, we weren't certain of it. The mist reduced visibility to about 15 ft.'and even our compass behaved erratically. Barry found a rough cairn, making us both happier, and after some cautious travelling we found another. Our track was now down, over rock, greasy with moisture, across shingle fans when we left the ridge in order to Pass bluffs, till we were travelling dotn over swampy tussock. Soon an occasional stunted tree appeared. It had taken hours to reach tree level, and we were glad of the shelter +
-from the wind and driven rain. Now the path was a muddy track, rivulets dropping and damming behind tree-trunks. Cabbage-trees+
 appeared among the beech. Flora saddle welcomed us, and down to Flora Hut for lunch and warmth. appeared among the beech. Flora saddle welcomed us, and down to Flora Hut for lunch and warmth.
-Retracing Our steps over the saddle we almost strolled down the well-made'track, stopping near the bottom to fill our billies with mushrooms, remembering what frugality awaited us back in the "batch." Passing by the farm, the farmer's wife called us in to tea and scones, enquired after our trip, and then asked us how we planned:to get back As we weren't in a hurry we had intended to hitch or walk, but the very kindly farmer's wife rang some neighbours further down the road + 
-and found one who was going in to Motueka by car in an hour's time. +Retracing our steps over the saddle we almost strolled down the well-made track, stopping near the bottom to fill our billies with mushrooms, remembering what frugality awaited us back in the "batch." Passing by the farm, the farmer's wife called us in to tea and scones, enquired after our trip, and then asked us how we planned to get backAs we weren't in a hurry we had intended to hitch or walk, but the very kindly farmer's wife rang some neighbours further down the road and found one who was going in to Motueka by car in an hour's time. Fatigue and wet weather made us doubly thankful for this very kind gesture both on her part and the driver's. The miles quickly passed and later that evening, over a meal of mushrooms and bacon, we discussed the best all-round trip either of us had ever done. So ended Easter 1953
-Fatigue and wet weather made us doubly thankful for this very kind gesture both on her part and the driver's. The miles quickly passed and later that evening, over a meal of mushrooms and bacon, we discussed the best all-round trip either of us had ever doneo + 
-So ended Easter 1953, +=====The Scrounge Of The Century===== 
-THE SCROUNGE OF TEE CENTURY+
 - Alex Colley. - Alex Colley.
-Some walkers have long realised that scrounging saves poundage + 
-the pack, and the at has skilled practitioners. Some admire their neighbour's cooking, others habitually visit spoon in hand. And ther,_ +Some walkers have long realised that scrounging saves poundage in the pack, and the art has skilled practitioners. Some admire their neighbour's cooking, others habitually visit spoon in hand. And there are those who arrive without a tent and are taken in. But it remained for mere beginners to achieve the ultimate. It is doubtful whether any scrounger has arrived with nothing but the clothes he stood in and obtained his complete needs for a week-end camp. Nevertheless this was the achievement, not of a single wily walker, but of the entire Croker family! They came to enjoy the re-union camp fire and return that night, but were offered sleeping bags and blankets by the Kirkbys and the Barretts (who drove back after supper), and tents by Mouldy Harrison and the Harveys. Two entire meals and the wherewithal to eat them were contributed by others, and Richard even managed to wring some pipe tobacco out of Jim Brown, so all was well with the Crokers. 
-are those who arrive without a tent and are taken in. But it remainc + 
-for mere beginners to achieve the ultimate. It is doubtful whether +=====Federation Report April.===== 
-scrounger has arrived with nothing but the clothes he stood in and ob- + 
-talned his coftplete needs for a week-end canP. Nevertheless this was +Allen A. Strom 
-the achievement, not of a single wily walker, but of the entire Croke: famil71 They came to enjoy the re-union camp fire and return that + 
-night, but were offered sleeping bags and blankets by the Kirkbys and +====Barrington House:==== 
-the Barretts (who drove back after supper), and tents by Mouldy Harrison and the Harveys. Two entire meals and the wherewithal to eat them were contributed by others, and Richard even managed to wring some pipe tobacco out of Jim Brown, so all was well with the Crokers. + 
-14. +The Propeirtor of the House has indicated that he has no objections to Bushwalkers using the access through his property to the track to Carey'Peak. His objections had previously arisen from the actions of some walkers who did not observe the code of ethics. Bushwalkers are therefore advised to be discreet behaviour when passing the Barrington House. 
-FEDERATION REPORT APRIL+ 
-1111111114..1 +====Saint Helena:==== 
-Allen A. Strom + 
-BARRINGTON HOUSE: The Propeirtor of the House has indicated that +Federation would like Bushwalkers to know that St. Helena is held on a permissive occupancy by the Federation in an effort to prevent development at that place. Bushwalkers are invited to visit the area regularly and to encourage an interest in the retention of the primitive conditions existing. 
-he hos no objections to Bushwalkers using the access through his property to the track to Careyis Peak. His objections had previously arisen from the actions of some walkers who did not observe the code of ethics. Bushwalkers are therefore advised to be discreet behaviour when passing the Barrington Houseo + 
-SAINT HELENAFede',:atj3n would like Bushwalkers to know that St. +====Conservation Bureau:==== 
-Helena is held on a permissive occupancy by the Federation in an effort to prevent development at that place. Bushwalkers are invited to visit the area regularly and to encourage an interest in the retention of the primitive conditions existing. + 
-CONSERVATION BUREAU: Two new members have been added to the Bureau... Mr. B.W. Peach (C.M.W.), and Mr. Tom Moppett(S.B.W.). +Two new members have been added to the Bureau... Mr. B.W. Peach (C.M.W.), and Mr. Tom Moppett (S.B.W.). 
-SEARCH AND RESCUE: The Practice Week-end held on April 16/17th was + 
-not very satisfactoryArmy Signals had taken over completely and generally upset the efficacy of the practice as far as Bushwalkers were concerned. The Police have expressed a similar opinion and thanked the Bushwalkers for their patience and forbearance. +====Search And Rescue:==== 
-SOCIAL: Miss Edna Stretton (S.B.W.) has volunteered to organise + 
-Bushwalkers4 Ball and a committee is being called together, +The Practice Week-end held on April 16/17th was not very satisfactoryArmy Signals had taken over completely and generally upset the efficacy of the practice as far as Bushwalkers were concerned. The Police have expressed a similar opinion and thanked the Bushwalkers for their patience and forbearance. 
-THE WARRUMBUNGLE NATIONAL PARK: News has been received that the Trust for the Park has been set up. The Federation-will ask for the names of the Trustees. + 
-Maal..=1.0.1..11=010.1.1=1MINIMMI +====Social:==== 
-BE AT BLUE GUY - on MAY 13 - 14 - 15. . CONJOINT WORKING BEE CORROBOREE INSTRUCTIONAL WEEK-ENDPro ramme of Events. + 
-Saturday Sat night Sunday +Miss Edna Stretton (S.B.W.) has volunteered to organise a Bushwalkers' Ball and a committee is being called together. 
-- Light work to keep-the river chanel clear and prevent bank erosion (Shovels, spades, pick axes and mattocks usefu: + 
-- Campfire under the control of Malcolm McGregor. Possibly another 'opera"+====The Warrumbungle national Park:==== 
-- Instructional forProspectives. Fraternising for Member. + 
-Leaders: Ross LairdJimBrown. +News has been received that the Trust for the Park has been set up. The Federation will ask for the names of the Trustees. 
-TH.E CALOOLA GLUE + 
-...so.* [Founded_ 1945] +=====Be At Blue Gum - on May 13-14-15.===== 
-OUR MAY GEOGRAPHY TOUR, 1955. + 
-(May 20th to June 1st) +Conjoint working Bee Corroboree Instructional Week-End. 
- 111.  Sib. S. + 
-TEE TOUR will he by Club Coach, visiting Tamworth, Armidale, the old mining town of Hingrove, the New England National Park at Pint Lookout, the Nymboida, Graftonl, Port Macquarie, the Comboyne, The Foorganna Faunal Reserve on the Bulga Plateau, Crowdy Head near Taree, and Newcastle4, +====Proramme of Events.==== 
-TEE PURPOSE OF THE TOUR  will hp to afford_ opportunities to observe the geography and natural history of the areas visited+ 
-COSTOF THE TOUR Share in the running cost of the vehicle and food: E 10 (ten pounds) +Saturday - Light work to keep-the river chanel clear and prevent bank erosion (Shovels, spades, pick axes and mattocks useful) 
-Each member of the party must be affiliated with the Club. This costa 2/6d. + 
-The Club will provide food, cooking and eating uten- +Saturday night - Campfire under the control of Malcolm McGregor. Possibly another 'opera"
-sils and oampimg gear tobe included in the E 10+ 
-The Tour will be under the leadership of Allen A. StromA.W. Dingeldoi will be in charge of vehicles and (Mrs) E.M. Dingeldei tn charge of catering. Each member of party will he requiredto undertake Camp Duties which will include preparation and distribution of food, camp cleaning and tenting. +Sunday - Instructional for Prospectives. Fraternising for Member. 
-0 APPLICATIONS ARE NOW INVITED: Each application must he accompanieE + 
-by a deposit of three pounds (E 3) plus +Leaders: Ross LairdJim Brown. 
-the affiliatian fee of 2/6  where such + 
-+=====The Caloola Club===== 
-is applicable. + 
-Further details and application forms available from +[Founded 1945] 
-Allen. A. Strom:(Mrs) E.M. Dingeldei, + 
-Th.e Teachers' College, 42 Byron Street, +Our May Geography Tour, 1955. (May 20th to June 1st) 
-Smith Street, HALMAINCROYDON. + 
-WR 2528 UA 2983 +====The Tour:==== 
-di + 
-HE CALOOLA. CLUB, +will be by Club Coach, visiting Tamworth, Armidale, the old mining town of Hillgrove, the New England National Park at Point Lookout, the Nymboida, Grafton, Port Macquarie, the Comboyne, The Boorganna Faunal Reserve on the Bulga Plateau, Crowdy Head near Taree, and Newcastle. 
-Fo =Id ed. 1945+ 
-NEVIBOIDA. +====The Purpose Of The Tour:==== 
-- /11/  + 
-\-, C,larence .t +will be to afford opportunities to observe the geography and natural history of the areas visited. 
-4) ) GRAFTON + 
-y 1 i +====Cost Of The Tour:==== 
-+ 
-, 7) +Share in the running cost of the vehicle and food: £10 (ten pounds)Each member of the party must be affiliated with the Club. This costs 2/6d. The Club will provide food, cooking and eating utensils and campimg gear to be included in the £10. 
-+ 
-+The Tour will be under the leadership of Allen A. StromA.W. Dingeldei will be in charge of vehicles and (Mrs) E.M. Dingeldei in charge of catering. Each member of party will he required to undertake Camp Duties which will include preparation and distribution of food, camp cleaning and tenting. 
-GOFFS HARBOUR 7e/1 / + 
-(,Beil(ngen R.. POINT. LOO OUT (New England +====Applications Are Now Invited:==== 
-( National + 
-(. 1 +Each application must he accompanied by a deposit of three pounds (£3) plus 
-\c\racleo R +the affiliation fee of 2/6d. where such is applicable. 
-Park) + 
-?) +Further details and application forms available from
-TAID/VORTH + 
-KEIEPSEY C( I J +Allen. A. Strom, The Teachers' College, Smith Street, Balmain(WB 2528) 
-+ 
-+(MrsE.MDingeldei, 42 Byron StreetCroydon. (UA 2983
-)P0RU MACQUARIE -COMBOYNE PLATEAU' + 
-BULGA PLATE.1-\xU (Boorganna +=====One Version Of The 85-Miler===== 
-/// +
-Faunal: Reshere) +
-G BEAT +
-\Oi///\\\\10 +
-//11\ ///til\` +
-_rnts'Nerowdy HeadTARE +
-\1( +
-B. +
-SIINTGLETON +
-/-+
-NEWCASTLE +
-THE MAY GEOGRAPHY TOUR, +
-1955. +
-. 4. a. 64 V 4. II4. IN I. +
-+
-SYDNEY, +
-1) +
-15. +
-ONE VERSION OF THE 85-MILER+
 - Kevin Ardill - Kevin Ardill
 +
 "The longest way round is the sweetest way home"  0h. Yeah  and might I also add, "Therets no fool like an old foo1.21 The foregoing is just about enough description of the trip, but a week has passed, the legs are beginning to feel like legs again, the clickitg has almost disappeared from the knee caps, blisters healing nicely, thank you, and when I've deseeded my socks I'll stagger in to the Club and resign. "The longest way round is the sweetest way home"  0h. Yeah  and might I also add, "Therets no fool like an old foo1.21 The foregoing is just about enough description of the trip, but a week has passed, the legs are beginning to feel like legs again, the clickitg has almost disappeared from the knee caps, blisters healing nicely, thank you, and when I've deseeded my socks I'll stagger in to the Club and resign.
 I'm pretty sure it was Jim Brow/17s fault. I consider he talked me into it, but he assures me that the opposite is correct. We thought to gain slight advantage by going to Katoomba on "The Fish," and I booked accordingly. I met Jim at a quarter to five and found seats 50 and 51, Car 7, a little difficult to locate in a carriage of 48 seats. After a little simple calculation by the conductor we found ourselves in eats 2 and 3, Car 9. Amazint what? Soot we are Joined by Geof Wagg, Grace Aird, Don Newis and Heather Joyce, all holders of seats 50 and 51. A gentle glow steals through my frame when Heather asks to be allowed to sit next to me. Would I mind? The glow soon departs when Heather mentions that the window seat'is the attraction. Your eyes shall be as full of coal as Bunnerong, Miss Joyce, but I shall not lift handkerchief or dig with'match on your behalf. No Sirs I disclose that I have a 25-lb pack, and Jim with a no-frame pack has slightly less. I've never had such a light pack - it floated like a gossamer. I'm pretty sure it was Jim Brow/17s fault. I consider he talked me into it, but he assures me that the opposite is correct. We thought to gain slight advantage by going to Katoomba on "The Fish," and I booked accordingly. I met Jim at a quarter to five and found seats 50 and 51, Car 7, a little difficult to locate in a carriage of 48 seats. After a little simple calculation by the conductor we found ourselves in eats 2 and 3, Car 9. Amazint what? Soot we are Joined by Geof Wagg, Grace Aird, Don Newis and Heather Joyce, all holders of seats 50 and 51. A gentle glow steals through my frame when Heather asks to be allowed to sit next to me. Would I mind? The glow soon departs when Heather mentions that the window seat'is the attraction. Your eyes shall be as full of coal as Bunnerong, Miss Joyce, but I shall not lift handkerchief or dig with'match on your behalf. No Sirs I disclose that I have a 25-lb pack, and Jim with a no-frame pack has slightly less. I've never had such a light pack - it floated like a gossamer.
195505.txt · Last modified: 2016/01/28 16:50 by tyreless