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195807 [2016/02/09 19:53]
kennettj
195807 [2016/02/10 01:42] (current)
kennettj
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 ====== Famous Last Words ====== ====== Famous Last Words ======
  
-or - "Bull Moose"+"Bull Moose"
  
 WHY DON'T I KEEP MY BIG MOUTH SHUT? WHY DON'T I KEEP MY BIG MOUTH SHUT?
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 So off I went to Coonabarabran, which turned out to be quite a nice little place really, comparing favourably with many larger country towns. So off I went to Coonabarabran, which turned out to be quite a nice little place really, comparing favourably with many larger country towns.
  
-1st February - arrived at Coona.\\+1st February - arrived at Coona. 
 2nd February - "Night drive out and have a look at this Timor Rock." So out I went. Timor is a volcanic plug (Trachite) about 500 - 600 feet high. By its base runs Shawn's Creek, which in dry weather runs mostly under the stones, but provides good water if you boil it. The Rock is about eight miles from Coona. 2nd February - "Night drive out and have a look at this Timor Rock." So out I went. Timor is a volcanic plug (Trachite) about 500 - 600 feet high. By its base runs Shawn's Creek, which in dry weather runs mostly under the stones, but provides good water if you boil it. The Rock is about eight miles from Coona.
 Reports from the townspeople vary.\\ Reports from the townspeople vary.\\
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 This last proved to be a photo taken at the old "Bottle Rock!' (which has now fallen) which was, I believe, about a third of the way up. However on 2.2.58 I hadn't heard these reports so I set off up. Almost up. Got to within 40 feet of the top and things got a bit dicey. Well! I might go home and come out some other time end go right up." This last proved to be a photo taken at the old "Bottle Rock!' (which has now fallen) which was, I believe, about a third of the way up. However on 2.2.58 I hadn't heard these reports so I set off up. Almost up. Got to within 40 feet of the top and things got a bit dicey. Well! I might go home and come out some other time end go right up."
  
-8th February - "Come on Harry. Let's go un Timor Rock today." "What's it like," says Harry. +8th February - "Come on Harry. Let's go up Timor Rock today." "What's it like," says Harry. "It's a bit steep on the front but we'll have a look around the back." So with Jill and Elaine as cooks at base camp we set off round the north side of Timor. 
-"It's a bit steep on the front but we'll have a look around the back." So with Jill and Elaine as cooks at base camp we set off round the north side of Timor.+ 
 +"We might get up this way." "Not b likely." "Ah well, let's have a look around here." "Hang on. What am I supposed to stand on." "That bit of rock there. Down a bit. Half an inch to the left." "Hell:" "Funny: That bit of rock didn't look to be loose." "Up this crack here." 
 +  
 +One hour later. "What's holding that thumping big rock over your head." "Can't get past the damned thing." Well,. we might as well go down. This rain might make the rock a bit slippery anyway"
 + 
 +14th February, off to Sydney to buy textbooks etc. While there I bought a camera and 100 mm lens, a couple of rolls of Kodachrome, and of course, a haze filter. 
 + 
 +23rd February - back at Timor. Same crew with two new climbers, Monty and Mac, "Let's try the west side." "Hell: It's sheer rock." "Let's try the SX, corner on the West side." Half an hour later. "Let's go back down." Quarter of an hour later. "How about the creek side at the western end?" "We'll try here." "Look, Nev remarks: This must be the way up. Come on." 
 + 
 +Half an hour later. "Harry." "Yes." "They are my tricoune marks. This is the way you can't get up." "I'm hungry, let's go back and see if lunch is ready." "It should be, it's 3.30." 
 + 
 +1st March - Timor. Same two cooks. Harry, Monty and I are climbing - Mac has been posted to Molong. We have 100 feet of rope for coming down and for belays if we need them. Harry and Monty prefer to slide down the rope rather than abseil, but are showing interest in the easier form of travel. By now we know that the way up is the western end of the creek side - the last crack almost - the crack being shaped like a C, crescent shaped. This does in fact provide a route to the top. The climbing is not what I would call easy and in a few places I felt it was much easier to think about food or anything rather than the horrible mess which would result if one fell 200 feet straight down without even the odd rock to bounce off on the way. Apart from that it was a good climb, although the pint of water we carried was not really enough. Well we were thirsty. The view from the top does not show any of the other main features except Moora, but does provide some excellent scenery when looking over Coona and across the flat with the Coolah Mountains in the distance and just a hazy glimpse of the Main Divide. 
 + 
 +When you try to climb a rock three times and fail, and get up on the fourth, you feel really good. Timor, I guess, rates low on the scale of difficulty, but judging by the looks on Harry and Monty and the way we felt - well - Hillary and Tensing couldn't have felt much better at the top of Everest. 
 + 
 +"Hell! It's three o'clock. I'm starving. Let's go back down and find some FOOD." 
 + 
 + 
 +**YOU DEFINITELY CAN'T BANK ON IT** 
 + 
 +You can't bank on August Bank Holiday - but those walkers, who, by their devoted attention to their jobs throughout the year will have earned their relaxation on Monday, 4th August next, CAN bank on a minimum of feet-vetting on Brian Harvey's Bank Holiday walk, which entails only two crossings of the cold Cox, and even those may be avoided, if we can sneak through Goolara Portal on the left bank. To encourage the Lower Income Group by saving the added train fare to Blackheath and the 7/6 car fare to Megalong Post Office, it is now proposed that the walk will leave Katoomba via Nellie's Glen on the Friday night to camp at the Old Pub site. Thence down the Fix Foot Track to Old Father Cox, up Breakfast and Glenalan Creeks to Glenalan Crossing. This latter section will cover an interesting and little-trodden portion of ,Rc C. Creeks, involving the by-passing of several picturesque waterfalls and pools. Tea at the All British Cafe, Katoomba. Total fares - 24/-.\\ 
 +Brian Harvey - Business BUI611 private JU14A2. 
 + 
 + 
 +====== Letter from Edna Gerrad ====== 
 + 
 +Maria Theresien Schlosal, Hellbrun, Salzbert. 
 + 
 +5th June, 1958. Dear Bushwalkers,
  
-"We might get un this way." "Not b  likely." "Ah well Let's have a look around here." "Hang on. What em I sunnosed to stand on." "ThPt bit of rock there. Down a bit. Half an inch to the left." "Hell:" "FunIY: That bit of rock didn't look to be loose." "UP this crack here." 
- One hour later. "What's holding that thumping big rock over your head." "Can't get past the damned thing." mNell,. we might as well go down. This rain might make the rock a bit slippery anyway.".- 
-14th February.- off to Sydney to buy textbooks etc. While there I bought a camera and 100 m m. lens, a couple of rolls of Kodachrome, and of course, a haze filter. 
-12. 
-"Ah 
-13. 
-23rd February - back at Timor. Same crew with two new climbers, Monty and Mac, "Let's try the West side." "Hell: It's sheer rock." "Let's try the SX, corner on the West side." 
-Half an hour later. "Let's go back down." 
-Quarter of an hour later. "How about the creek side at the western end?" "We'll try here." "Look, Nev, tricoune marks: This must be the ivy. up. Come on." 
-Half an hour later. "Harry." 'Yes." "They are my tricoune marks. This is the way you can't get up." "I'm hungry, let's go back and see if lunch is ready." "It should be, it's 3.30." 
-1st March - Timor. Same two cooks. Harry, Monty and I arc climbing - Mac has been posted to Molong. We have 100 feet of rope for coming down nnd for belays if we need them. Harry and Monty prefer to slide down the rope rather than abseil, but are showing interest in the easier form of travel. By now we know that the way up is the western end of the creek side - the last crack almost - the crack being shaped like a C, crescent shaped. This does in fact provide a. route to the top. The climbing is not what I would call easy and in a few places I felt it was much easier to think about food or anything rather than the horrible mess which would result if one fell 200 feet straight down without even the odd rock to bounce off on the way. Apart from that it was a good climb, although the tint of water we cnrried was not really enough. Well we were thirsty. The view from the ton does not show any of the other main features except Mopra, but does provide some excellent scenery when looking over Coona and across the flat with the Coolah Mountains in the distance and just a hazy glimpse of the Win Divide. 
-. When you try to climb a rock three times and fail, and get Up on the fourth, you feel really good. Timor, I guess, rates low on the scale of difficulty, but judging by the looks on Harry and Monty and the way rfelt - well - Hillary and Tensing Couldn't have felt much better at the to of Everest. 
-"Hell! It's three o'clock. I'm STnV1-77). Let's go back down and find some FOOD." 
-YOU DEFINITELY CAN'T BANK ON IT 
-You can't bank on August Bank Holiday - but those walkers, who, by their devoted attention to their jobs throughout the year will have earned their relaxation on Monday, 4th August next, CAN bank on n minimum of feet- vetting on Brian Harvey's Bank 7o1idn.7Wv,lk, which entails only two crossings of the cold Cox, and even those may be avoided, if we can sneak through Cloolnra Portal on the left bank. To encourage the Lower Income Group by saving the added train fare to Blaclrheath and the 7/6 cflr fare to mepalong 'ost Office, it is now Proposed that the Talk will leave Tatoemba vin Nellie's Glen on the Friday night to camp at the Old nub site. Thence down the Fix Foot Track to Old Father Cox, un Breakfast and GlenPlan Creeks to Glennlnn Crossing. This latter section will cover Pn interesting and little-trodden rortion of ,Rc C. Creeks, involving the by-passing of several nicturesouf' waterfalls nrd pools. Tea at the All British Cafe, Katoombe. Total fares - 24/-. 
-Brian Harvey - Business BU.I611 'private Ju.14A2. 
-Maria Theresien Schlosal, Hellbrun, 
-Salzbert. 
-5th June, 1958. Dear Bushwallcers, 
 Here is a brief record of my trip to date. Please excuse z for y as I can't get used to this machine in the short time for which I have it. Here is a brief record of my trip to date. Please excuse z for y as I can't get used to this machine in the short time for which I have it.
-Went first to Bangkok and found that very colourful and interesting - + 
-things like the King's Barges which are 150 feet long and very much decorated. Did zou see the film "The King and I"? Thez used one of the barges in that. Temples with large gold Buddahs. A lot of the life of the town is on the canals. Went out and saw the markets, which comprise barges carrzing fruit and vegetables, but was rather horrified to see the locals swimming and cleaning their teeth in the canals into which all the rubbish goes: +Went first to Bangkok and found that very colourful and interesting - things like the King's Barges which are 150 feet long and very much decorated. Did you see the film "The King and I"? They used one of the barges in that. Temples with large gold Buddahs. A lot of the life of the town is on the canals. Went out and saw the markets, which comprise barges carrying fruit and vegetables, but was rather horrified to see the locals swimming and cleaning their teeth in the canals into which all the rubbish goes
-Went down to Cambodia and found Ankor Wat fascinating. It is verz + 
-necessarz, in mz opinion, to read it all up before zou go as the guides' English +Went down to Cambodia and found Ankor Wat fascinating. It is very necessary, in my opinion, to read it all up before you go as the guides' English is very poor. It was very hot in the East and at all the airports in the Middle East; at all times of the night the heat was really shocking. After looking down on the muddy Nile and Ganges it was wonderful to fly over the Blue Mediterranean. 
-is verz poor. + 
-It was verz hot in the East and at all the airports in the Middle East; at all times of the night the heat was reallz shocking. After looking dawn on the muddz Nile and Ganges it was wonderful to flz over the Blue Mediterranian+Greece and Southern Italy looked glorious from the air with high mountains, snowcapped, with glaciers in places coming down to the sea. Italy was very interesting and Florence and Venice are very tempting to females, with lovely things to buy - clothes, linen, leatherwork and glass. However, I managed to be pretty firm with myself. The churches were interesting and saw the Pope at St. Peters. On the whole I was glad to leave the cities and was thrilled with the mountains of North Italy. Had several lovely days at Cortina and went to the Gross Glockner, which is a magnificent mountain. On the way the fields were full of brightly coloured flowers and everywhere they have been haymaking - I love the smell of newly cut hay. There is very little machinery in Italy and most of the farm work is done by hand, and they use bullocks and donkeys. Had a lovely day's walking at Cortina when I followed a stream through the woods. Fortunately struck a Rhodesian girl who also liked walking. We had rolls and wine at an inn, for lunch. Had some difficulty with the language in Italy as their season has not started, However, I saw the country and went over the lovely passes. 
-Greece and Southern Italz looked glorious from the air with high mountains, snowcapped, with glaciers in places coming down to the sea. + 
-Italz was verz interesting and Florence and Venice are verz tempting to females, with lovelz things to buz - clothes, linen, leatherwork and glass. However, I managed to be prettz firm with mzself. The churches were interesting and saw the Pope at St. Peters. On the whole I was glad to leave the cities and was thrilled with the mountains of North Italz. Had several lovelz dazs at Cortina and went to the Gross Glockner, which is a magnificent mountain. On the waz the fields were full of brightlz coloured flowers and everzwhere thez have been hazmaking - I love the smell of newlz cut haz. There is verz little machinerz in Italy and most of the farm work is done bz hand, and thez use bullocks and donkies. Had a lovelz daz's walking at Cortina when I followed a stream through the woods. Fortunatelz struck a Rhodesian girl who also liked walking. We had +Austria is coming up to all my expectations. Loved Vienna. Had an interesting tour of Vienna by night and visited cafes in the Vienna Woods, finally seeing a very good floor show at a night club. They gave us wine at each stop and champagne at the nightclub. Bz midnight I could have done with a good Australian steak. Yesterday went to Berahtesgaden and was very thrilled with my glimpse of Bavaria. Hitler seems to have picked out a remarkable spot for his Eagle's nest. We inspected the underground fortifications. The Konig See struck me as rather like the sounds of New Zealand. Have been to Wolfgang See and had tea at the White Horse Inn in tourist fashion. 
-rolls and wine at an inn, for lunch. Had some difficultz with the language in Italz as their season has not started, However, I saw the country and went over the lovelz passes. +
-Austria is coming up to all mz expectations. Loved Vienna. Had an interesting tour of Vienna bz night and visited cafes in the Vienna Woods, finallz seeing a verz good floor show at a night club. Thez gave us wine at +
-each stop and champagne at the nightclub. Bz midnight I could have done with a +
-good Australian steak: Zesterdaz went to Berahtesgaden'and was verz thrilled with mz glimpse of Bavaria. Hitler seems to have picked out a remarkable spot +
-for his Eagle's nest. We inspected the underground fortifications. The Konig See struck me as rather like the sounds of New Zealand. Have been to Wolfgang See and had tea at the White Horse Inn in tourist fashion.+
 Often wish I had some S.B.W. friends with me. Regards to all. Often wish I had some S.B.W. friends with me. Regards to all.
-Edna G. + 
-14. + 
-15. +**OF VEGETARIAN GLUTEN STEAKS** 
-ofiVEGETARIAN + 
-- : +Tasty meatless meals with a high protein value. They come in tins, and only need to be fried. A very satisfying substitute for fresh meat. Delicious when cooked in butter. 
-GLUTENSTEAKS + 
-Tasty meatless meals with a high protein value. They come in tins, and only need to be fried. A very satisfying substitute for fresh meat. Delicious when cooked in batter :I + 
-Delhi, India.+====== Letter from Dormie ====== 
 + 
 +Delhi, India.\\
 Sunday, 18/5/58. Dear Bushwalkers, Sunday, 18/5/58. Dear Bushwalkers,
-Today I took un residencu in a private boarding establishment in this, the chief city of the Republic of India, after having been for nine days at Darjeeling, over 7,200 ft. above seP level -in the HimPlpya Mountains. It is hard to believe that where Snnndragons and Cnlendulns grow in normal way, and the ordinary business of life proceeds in a normPl fnshion, the altitude is higher than that of Mt. ,Kosciusko, our-highest mountain. True it is that you have dense mists that come 1210 from nowhere, mpking g;-,neral visibility very poor, but still the people move about in dense throngs, greeting _each other in the market-place and in the tortuous 1Pnes that cend and descend everywhere. Although for chennness (8 rupees per day, equRl to 16/- in our money)-I boarded where Indian meals only, were served, yet I was able to relieve ,the monotony by going to a place called Glenory's, where every dish under the sun was served "a la carte". Here I had my evening me-a to the accompaniment of the latest recorded music from the United States. + 
-Although part of the HimalayRs, the views from Darjeeling of the highest peaks were disappointing and frustrating because the mists already mentioned blotted out such distantscenery. (Hangchenjunga, 28,146 ft., the third highest of the Himalayan peaks, is 42 miles from Dnrjeeling.)- - The higher you climbed, the more likelyyou wereto become envelooed in dense cloud. Daybreak wns the best time for seeing these "ginnts"; if you missed out on seeing them at 6 a m., there was very little chance during the rest of the day, because the rising sun only gathered un more nnd more cvanoration +Today I took up residence in a private boarding establishment in this, the chief city of the Republic of India, after having been for nine days at Darjeeling, over 7,200 ft. above sea level in the Himalaya Mountains. It is hard to believe that where Snapdragons and Calendulas grow in normal way, and the ordinary business of life proceeds in a normal fashion, the altitude is higher than that of Mt. Kosciusko, our highest mountain. True it is that you have dense mists that come down from nowhere, making general visibility very poor, but still the people move about in dense throngs, greeting each other in the market-place and in the tortuous lanes that wind and descend everywhere. Although for cheapness (8 rupees per day, equal to 16/- in our money) I boarded where Indian meals only, were served, yet I was able to relieve the monotony by going to a place called Glenory's, where every dish under the sun was served "a la carte". Here I had my evening meal to the accompaniment of the latest recorded music from the United States. 
-clouds es the day wore on. But if you did see those "tops" etirly, in the morning, you were rewarded with an unforgettable sight. The snow on the peaks glistened like silver in the morning sun. + 
-On the first !Darning of my stay in Darjeeling I saw them from ati bedroom window, but did not photograph them at the time, because I just took them forgranted, and mistakenly thought that Ftny old time would do. However, the rest +Although part of the Himalayas, the views from Darjeeling of the highest peaks were disappointing and frustrating because the mists already mentioned blotted out such distant scenery. (Kangchenjunga, 28,146 ft., the third highest of the Himalayan peaks, is 42 miles from Darjeeling.)  The higher you climbed, the more likely you were to become enveloped in dense cloud. Daybreak was the best time for seeing these "giants"; if you missed out on seeing them at 6 a m., there was very little chance during the rest of the day, because the rising sun only gathered un more and more evaporation clouds as the day wore on. But if you did see those "tops" entirely in the morning, you were rewarded with an unforgettable sight. The snow on the peaks glistened like silver in the morning sun. 
-of the nine days at Darjeeling was like the musician's quest after "the lost chordI was vainly seeking the glory which for a short time only had appeared. I even climbed 6i miles up Tiger Hill with try pack to spend the night at an altitude of nearly 8,500 ft. above sea-level so that might get a glimpse at dawn of Everest, over 29,000 ft. above sea-level, but all I recorded with my movie camsra WAS a mere glimpse indeed, which one has to pick out from the surrounding clouds. The locals tell me that November is the best time for visibility.+ 
 +On the first dawning of my stay in Darjeeling I saw them from my bedroom window, but did not photograph them at the time, because I just took them for granted, and mistakenly thought that any old time would do. However, the rest of the nine days at Darjeeling was like the musician's quest after "the lost chord"I was vainly seeking the glory which for a short time only had appeared. I even climbed miles up Tiger Hill with try pack to spend the night at an altitude of nearly 8,500 ft. above sea-level so that might get a glimpse at dawn of Everest, over 29,000 ft. above sea-level, but all I recorded with my movie camera WAS a mere glimpse indeed, which one has to pick out from the surrounding clouds. The locals tell me that November is the best time for visibility. 
 Yours, Yours,
-trlormiet +Dormie 
-YOUR WALKING GUIDE - JULY+ 
 + 
 +====== Your Walking Guide ====== 
 + 
 +JULY
 Walk No. Walk No.
-Morong Ck-Paralyser-Guouogang. Medium Test Walk of ridges west of Cox. Climb of 2,500 ft. on Sunday, with views of Wild Dogs etc. See leader re transport. + 
-Glenbrook-St. Helena-Soringwood.Interesting walk of lower mountains. Mostly ridge-walking and good campsite at Pt. Helena. Cost 15/5. +68 Morong Ck-Paralyser-Guouogang. Medium Test Walk of ridges west of Cox. Climb of 2,500 ft. on Sunday, with views of Wild Dogs etc. See leader re transport.\\ 
-70 Waterfall-Kangaroo Ck-Audley. A nonular walk in National Park. Good track without climbing for an easy day. Cost - 8/4.. +69 Glenbrook - St. Helena -Springwood. Interesting walk of lower mountains. Mostly ridge-walking and good campsite at St. Helena. Cost  15/5.\\ 
-71 Jenolan Pine Forest-Black Range-Megmlonp Volley-Kotoombo.. A medium walk with good track and easy climb to Katoombo. Cost - 44/9. +70 Waterfall-Kangaroo Ck- Audley. A popular walk in National Park. Good track without climbing for an easy day. Cost - 8/4.\\ 
-72 Perry's-Blue Gum-Lockley's Pylon-Leura. Medium Test walk camping at Blue Gum Forest. Climb of 2,500 ft.thence good track to Leura. +71 Jenolan Pine Forest-Black Range-Meglong Valley-Katoomba.. A medium walk with good track and easy climb to Katoomba. Cost - 44/9.\\ 
-Excellent views 'Of Grose Valley. Cost - 27/9. +72 Perry's-Blue Gum-Lockley's Pylon-Leura. Medium Test walk camping at Blue Gum Forest. Climb of 2,500 ft. thence good track to Leura. Excellent views of Grose Valley. Cost - 27/9.\\ 
-75 Bobbin Hd.-Cowan Ck-Cowan. Easy walk in Karingoi Chose with track. Cost - 10/2. +75 Bobbin Hd.-Cowan Ck-Cowan. Easy walk in Karingai Chase with track. Cost - 10/2.\\ 
-74 Morong Ck-Kowmung R-Doris Ck-Kanangra. An excellent opnortunity to -visit the Kowmung made possible by private transport. Swimming might be necessary, with rock-scrambling and rock-hooping+74 Morong Ck-Kowmung R-Doris Ck-Kanangra. An excellent opportunity to visit the Kowmung made possible by private transport. Swimming might be necessary, with rock-scrambling and rock-hopping.\\ 
-75 Instructional Walk (Long Angle Gully-Emu Plains. Good campsite with an easy walk along creek on Sunday. Cost - 13/8. +75 Instructional Walk Long Angle Gully-Emu Plains. Good campsite with an easy walk along creek on Sunday. Cost - 13/8.\\ 
-76 Megalong P.0.-Six Foot Track-Glen Allen Ck-Clear Hill-Totoomba. An  easy Bank Holiday trip with river walking and rock-hontdng. Cost 23/.., +76 Megalong P.0.-Six Foot Track-Glen Allen Ck-Clear Hill-Katoomba. An  easy Bank Holiday trip with river walking and rock-hopping. Cost 23/.\\ 
-77 Camden-Werriberri Ck-warrogamba--Frskine Ck-Glenbrook. A medium 'Pest Walk to unusualcountry, some scrub on ridge tops, with track into Glenbrook. +77 Camden-Werriberri Ck-Warragamba--Erskine Ck-Glenbrook. A medium Test Walk to unusual country, some scrub on ridge tops, with track into Glenbrook.\\ 
-78 Glenbrook-Euroka-Campfire Ck-Glenbrook. Medium test walk in lower Blue Labrynth. Cost - 12/3. +78 Glenbrook-Euroka-Campfire Ck-Glenbrook. Medium test walk in lower Blue Labrynth. Cost - 12/3.\\ 
-79 Spring Hill-Mt. Jellore-Jellare Ck-Colo Vale. Medium test walk with good views from Jellore. Patchy scrub with creek walki ng. Cost 32/3. +79 Spring Hill-Mt. Jellore-Jellore Ck-Colo Vale. Medium test walk with good views from Jellore. Patchy scrub with creek walking. Cost 32/3.\\ 
-80 Glenbrook-Erskine Ck-Warragamba Dam. Medium walk with inspection of Warragamba Dam on Sunday. Cost 15/3. +80 Glenbrook-Erskine Ck-Warragamba Dam. Medium walk with inspection of Warragamba Dam on Sunday. Cost 15/3.\\ 
-81 Windsor-car to Scheyville-Cattai Ck-Long Swamp Ck-Maralya-Seheyville. +81 Windsor-car to Scheyville-Cattai Ck-Long Swamp Ck-Maralya-Scheyville. A medium walk mostly creek walking  cost 16/6.\\ 
-A medium walk mostly creek walking  cost 16(6. + 
-17. + 
-o KOSSIE TO KIANDRA ON SKIS +====== Kossie to Kiandra on Skis ====== 
-mPaddyP + 
-At Easter 1957 the Old Buffers Pdded Anzac Day (and the day in between) to the Easter holiday and decided to walk from Mt. Kosciusko to Kiandra. It was, I must confess, part of Ft deep laid plan on my part to prospect the journey on foot before attempting it on skis. As it turned out we could almost have used skis on the first day, because we left the summit in blizzard of wind and snow. It was so bad that by the time we got to Albina Hut my face was frozen and I could not talk. (The rest of the party being nrotected by ?addymade hoods thought it no loss!) +Paddy P 
-The next step to achieve my long cherished ambition was to find nPrtners for the ski trip. I mentioned the matter casually to Mark Mealey and Rynill Abel of the Youth Hostel Association, and to my surnrise they seid it was wizard idea, and dates were fixed there and then, (47 surnrise arose fromthe fact that as a skier I am only mediocre -whilst they -re pretty good.) + 
-Gear was discussed at some length and we eventually worked out three lists. A personal list, community list (comprising ski rennir 'ear, tent, first-aid kit, chuffer stove end fuel) and food list. +At Easter 1957 the Old Buffers added Anzac Day (and the day in between) to the Easter holiday and decided to walk from Mt. Kosciusko to Kiandra. It was, I must confess, part of deep laid plan on my part to prospect the journey on foot before attempting it on skis. As it turned out we could almost have used skis on the first day, because we left the summit in blizzard of wind and snow. It was so bad that by the time we got to Albina Hut my face was frozen and I could not talk. (The rest of the party being protected by Paddymade hoods thought it no loss!) 
-The tent was a three man "11" tent to which a wnternroof floor had been sewn in. Loops were sewn Pt each side so that P Sid could be threaded through and used as an anchor instead of pegs. One end was sewn up (weight 7 lbs.) For use in the snow each of us had P n1Rstic foam hin ned in proofed cover (8 oz. each). The stove and the tent were taken mainly in case We were overtaken by a blizzard, and were unable to reach hut. + 
-We took food for four days (the expected duration of the journey). +The next step to achieve my long cherished ambition was to find partners for the ski trip. I mentioned the matter casually to Mark Mealey and Rynill Abel of the Youth Hostel Association, and to my surprise they said it was wizard idea, and dates were fixed there and then, (My surprise arose from the fact that as a skier I am only mediocre whilst they are pretty good.) 
-In addition we had, with the help of a friend in the S.v.P.laid down sunnlies at Boobie Hut in case we ran out of supnlies by being delayed by bad weather. + 
-As large P pronortion as possible of the food reouired no cooking, so that, should we be weather-bound awaY from a hut, we should not need fuel to prepare food. +Gear was discussed at some length and we eventually worked out three lists. A personal list, community list (comprising ski repair gear, tent, first-aid kit, chuffer stove end fuel) and food list. 
-About twenty years ago, Tom and Jean Monett and Oliver voriartv had done the trio filom Kiandra to Kosciusko, but since that time the only nnrtv,to attempt the trip nearly lost their lives by getting comnletelv bushedWith thoughts of blizzards Pnd nil-visibility in mind we tested the effects of steel stocks, -nhoto electric light Meters and steel frames on a compass, and found that all these affected the comness quite considerably. After some ex. eriment I found that "Save." wrist comoPss (liquid filled) -worked. It would rive n true reading if held at arms-length away from the body desnite a steel frnme on the back, and a light meter in the pocket. <Cane stocks were carried - + 
-aluminium would have done as well). +The tent was a three man "A" tent to which a waterproof floor had been sewn in. Loops were sewn at each side so that a ski could be threaded through and used as an anchor instead of pegs. One end was sewn up (weight 7 lbs.) For use in the snow each of us had a plastic foam hip pad in proofed cover (8 oz. each). The stove and the tent were taken mainly in case we were overtaken by a blizzard, and were unable to reach hut. 
- Desnite all the extra items the evtrage Weight of our packs wes less  than 33 lbs..when we set off. + 
-We got a taxi to Munyang nower Station nd iturnedietely had to elide +We took food for four days (the expected duration of the journey). In addition we had, with the help of a friend in the S.M.A. laid down supplies at Boobie Hut in case we ran out of supplies by being delayed by bad weather. As large a proportion as possible of the food required no cooking, so that, should we be weather bound away from a hut, we should not need fuel to prepare food. 
-up to the surge tank. Rymill was in goOd nick, having snent the nrevious week at C.F.I.R.O. Hut. Mark and I were not acclimatised to altitude and soon began to pant. It is only four or five miles to whitc 7iver Hut, but I don't mind admitting that I just about pegged out before I got there. The hut was blocked by a wall of frozen snow through -which we had to chop to get in. I wns so tired that night that every time I tried to get into my sleening bap pot cramn. + 
-Ittook me nearly half an hour to achieve the comfort of my bag, as I was to. proud to ask the others to help me. +About twenty years ago, Tom and Jean Mophett and Oliver Moriartv had done the trip from Kiandra to Kosciusko, but since that time the only party to attempt the trip nearly lost their lives by getting completely bushedWith thoughts of blizzards and nil-visibility in mind we tested the effects of steel stocks, photo electric light Meters and steel frames on a compass, and found that all these affected the compass quite considerably. After some experiment I found that "Silva" wrist compass (liquid filled) -worked. It would give a true reading if held at arms-length away from the body despite a steel frame on the back, and a light meter in the pocket. Cane stocks were carried - aluminium would have done as well). 
-Next day was bright and clear, and we were all in high spirits. "This is IT" cried Rymill again and again. Indeed it was a day for joy. The snow +  
-was frosted with jewels, and crunched under our skis as we went along. This world of snow was ours and we were the only people in it. +Despite all the extra items the average Weight of our packs was less than 33 lbs when we set off. 
-We climbed up the long grade to the saddle and then ran easily down to Dicky Cooper Bongong Creek. We crossed and then started the slow grind up +We got a taxi to Munyang Power Station and immediately had to slide up to the surge tank. Rymill was in good nick, having spent the previous week at C.F.I.R.O. Hut. Mark and I were not acclimatised to altitude and soon began to pant. It is only four or five miles to White River Hut, but I don't mind admitting that I just about pegged out before I got there. The hut was blocked by a wall of frozen snow through which we had to chop to get in. I was so tired that night that every time I tried to get into my sleeping bag got cramp. It took me nearly half an hour to achieve the comfort of my bag, as I was too proud to ask the others to help me. 
-toward the Ghost Mountain. Lunch at the top and then across the plain; more climbs and then a good run down to Nawson's Hut. + 
- Next morning was even more beautiful than the first. A million jewels +Next day was bright and clear, and we were all in high spirits. "This is IT" cried Rymill again and again. Indeed it was a day for joy. The snow was frosted with jewels, and crunched under our skis as we went along. This world of snow was ours and we were the only people in it. We climbed up the long grade to the saddle and then ran easily down to Dicky Cooper Bongong Creek. We crossed and then started the slow grind up toward the Ghost Mountain. Lunch at the top and then across the plain; more climbs and then a good run down to Mawson's Hut. 
-sparkled in the snow. The marbled gums half buried in the snow glowed with colour, and there on the skyline was the Queen of the Range - Jagungal. How splendid she looked across the valley against the deep blue sky. +  
-The bridle track crosses the Valentine River, climbs to the Cup and +Next morning was even more beautiful than the first. A million jewels sparkled in the snow. The marbled gums half buried in the snow glowed with colour, and there on the skyline was the Queen of the Range - Jagungal. How splendid she looked across the valley against the deep blue sky. 
-Saucer and proceeds by the ridge to Bulls Peaks. We decided to keep to the valley on the East of Jagungal, cross a spur from the mountain and find the ridge + 
-on which Farm Ridge Hut lies. We made splendid time and had lunch high up on the slopes of Jagungal. The only signs of life were the tracks of numerous rabbits and faxes. What the faxes fed on was evident, but how the rabbits got a living in these frozen wastes was quite a mystery to us. We also saw occasional heavy tracks of a lumbering wombat. +The bridle track crosses the Valentine River, climbs to the Cup and Saucer and proceeds by the ridge to Bulls Peaks. We decided to keep to the valley on the East of Jagungal, cross a spur from the mountain and find the ridge on which Farm Ridge Hut lies. We made splendid time and had lunch high up on the slopes of Jagungal. The only signs of life were the tracks of numerous rabbits and foxes. What the foxes fed on was evident, but how the rabbits got a living in these frozen wastes was quite a mystery to us. We also saw occasional heavy tracks of a lumbering wombat. 
-We made such good time that we talked gleefully of reaching-Boobie Hut + 
-that night, and having P. blow out on the food cached there, but alas, it was not to be. +We made such good time that we talked gleefully of reaching Boobie Hut that night, and having blow out on the food cached there, but alas, it was not to be. The track follows the Doubtful River, and then reaches Farm Ridge crossing a wooded ridge. We could easily have descended through a gap to reach the track but we decided to proceed straight down the ridge instead. It was bad decision. The ridge was rocky and heavily timbered. The afternoon sun shone straight on the slope and created dozens of rocky rivulets from the melting snow. We tried to walk but sank thigh-deep in the soft drifts. Our skis tangled with roots and fouled rocks. It was terrible. 
-The track follows the Doubtful River, and then reaches Farm Ridge crossing a wooded ridge. We could easily have descended through a gPn to reach the track but we decided to proceed straight down the ridge instead. It was P. bad decision. The ridge was rocky and heavily timbered. The Pfternoon sun shone straight on the slone Pnd created dozens of rocky rivulets from the melting + 
-snow. We tried to walk but sank thigh-deen in the soft drifts. Our skis tangled with roots and fouled rocks. It was terrible. +It was nearly dark before three tired skiers arrived at Farm Ridge Hut. We entered the hut thankful to reach shelter, and stopped appalled at the revolting scene inside. Three tables stood in the "Kitchenladen with unwashed plates and mugs and half-empty food tins. To cap it all, there were three cast iron camp ovens full of mutton fat, two of which had their lids off. It appeared as if all the rats and possums and vermin for miles around had had monster party. We nearly vomited. On top of all this we saw inscribed in charcoal on the rafters of the hut two inscriptions - "Despise not the hut that gives you 
-It was nearly dark before three tired skiers arrived at Farm Ridge 7ut. We entered the hut thankful to reach shelter, and stonnerl annalled at the revolting scene inside. Three tables stood in the "Titchenlden with unwashed plates and mugs and half-empty food tins. To can it all, there were three cast iron CPMD ovens full of mutton fat, two of which had their lids off. It anneared as if all the rats and Possums and vermin for miles around had had monster +shelter" and "Hikers - we loathe them". Well, I can only say the mess did not seem like the sort of mess that hikers (or bushwalkers) would leave behind. We set to and boiled some water, cleared one table, and gave it scrubbing with hot soapy water; we cleaned the floor as best we could with an old chaff bag
-party. We nearly vomited. On ton of all this we saw inscribed in charcoal +
-on the rafters of the hut two inscriptions - "Dc anise not the hut that gives you +
-shelter" and "Hikers - we loathe them". Well, I can only say the mess did not seem like the sort of mess that hikers (or bushwalkers) would leave behind. lAire set to and boiled some water, cleared one table, and gave it P. scrubbing with hot soapy water; we cleaned the floor PS best we could with an old chaff bag+
 and despite the poor welcome had a thoroughly comfortable night. and despite the poor welcome had a thoroughly comfortable night.
-19. + 
-01. -,-, +Next day was dull and overcastWe ran easily down the valley to the Doubtful River, crossed, it dry shod and grunted up the climb to the Doubtful Gap. A long run-down Digger's Creek brought us to Boobie HutThere we had a hearty lunch, packed up what food we wanted and pushed onrecrossed the road leading to Junction Camp and descended to Happy Jacks River.  Here, for the first time the snow ran out. We had to walk half a mile and wade across the river (ugh). We soon hit snow again and climbed to Arsenic Ridge. As there was no convenient hut we decided to camp and soon found a snug place amongst the trees. We had a warm night and got an early start the next morning. There's a tricky-bit of navigation to Table Top Mountain and through wooded ridges until the open plain south of Kiandra is reached. We reckoned we had about 15 miles to go, and by lunch-time at 1.30 we had only covered six of them. The weather was worsening. Heavy clouds now gathered threatening snow and we planned to camp in the snow. However we pushed on and suddenly we climbed a rise and before us was the plain. Away in the distance could be seen the wireless poles of Kings Cross near Cabramurra township and the quarry on Mount Selwyn could plainly be seen. "Land ho" shouted Mark, and with a sudden burst of renewed energy we pushed on and covered the remaining seven miles to Kiandra in great style. We reached there just after darkhaving to walk the last mile owing to lack of snow. 
-Next day was dull and oVercastIffe ran easily down the valleY to the Doubtful River, crossed, it dry shod and grunte'up the climb to the Doubtful Gap. A long run-down Digleb's Creek brought usto Hut There we had a hearty lunch, packed up what foOd we wanted and 33ushed onrecrossed the road leading to Junction Camo_and descended to Happy Jacks River.  Here, for the first timethe snow ran out. We had to walk half a mile and wade across the river (ugh. We soon hit snow again and climbed to Arsenic Ridge. As there was no convenient hut we decided to camp and soon found a snug place amongstthe trees: Wehad a warm night and got an early start the next morning. There's a tricicy-bit of navigation to Table Top Mountain and through wooded ridges until the ,open plain south of Kiandra is reached. We reckoned we had about 15 miles to go, and by lunch-time at 1.30 we had only covered six of them. The weather wasm worsening. Heavy clouds now gathered threatening snow and we n1Pnned to CrIalcf.4 in the snow. However we ushed on and suddenly we climbed a rise and 'beedre us was the plain. Away in the distance could be seen the wireless poles Orf' Kings Cross near Cabramurra township and the quarry on Mount 9elwyn could ,plainiy be seen. "Land ho" shouted Mark, and with a sudden burst of renewed-energy we pushed on and covered the remaining seven miles to Tiandra in prePt style. We reached there just after darkhaving to walk the lest mile owing to lac" of snow.+
 Next day the blizzard came, but our journey was completed; Next day the blizzard came, but our journey was completed;
-, + 
-WHY DO INE DO IT? + 
-Why is it when we have a few beautiful colour slides, tinged with memories, admtred by our friends, why is it that we then expose these..to the critical and unsympathetic gaze of a competition judge? + 
-But there you are - we all do it. We can't help ourselves, that the time has comeround again, hurry away, dig out your treasuresamd bring them into the Club by 16th July or you'll miss having them slated-thiSt year.+**WHY DO WE DO IT?** 
 +Why is it when we have a few beautiful colour slides, tinged with memories, admired by our friends, why is it that we then expose these to the critical and unsympathetic gaze of a competition judge? 
 +But there you are - we all do it. We can't help ourselves, that the time has come around again, hurry away, dig out your treasures and bring them into the Club by 16th July or you'll miss having them slated this year.\\
 Oh: By the way, remember we're going to have two colour slide exhibitions and this one is for landscapes - no books, butterflies or birdies, and definitely none of Dormie's 5%. Oh: By the way, remember we're going to have two colour slide exhibitions and this one is for landscapes - no books, butterflies or birdies, and definitely none of Dormie's 5%.
-FROM DOROTHY LAMY + 
-I am planning to fly over to Sydney on Monday, 22nd sentember,and tofly back to Auckland on Saturday, 18th Octobcr. As the trin is Primarily to see as many as possible of my old friends, I'll be ponPing into the Club, arid going to Pete & Ray's for the Eight Hour Weekend, so I'll probably be seeing you all soon. +**FROM DOROTHY LAWRY**\\ 
-ir? +I am planning to fly over to Sydney on Monday, 22nd September and to fly back to Auckland on Saturday, 18th October. As the plan is primarily to see as many as possible of my old friends, I'll be popping into the Club, and going to Pete & Ray's for the Eight Hour Weekend, so I'll probably be seeing you all soon. 
-Brian Harvey'walkWa srlabe114:d thpecial 'walk for new members and prospectives", but the personnel was ,Proppectives, 3 members, EIGHT members more noteworthy for senioriV,than speed+ 
-4.1060," +Brian Harvey's walk was labelled Special Walk for New Members and Prospectives but the personnel was 2 Prospectives, 3 members, EIGHT members more noteworthy for seniority than speed. 
-PADDY'S PRETTY BUSY +
-So busy, in fact, that he's got even. +
-less time than usual to prepare his +
-advertisement. +
-He therefore can only repeat that classic phrase, "Come up and see me some timen. +
-All WALKERS, SKIERS and OUTDOOR FOLK +
-always welcome. +
-PADDY PALLIN PTY. LTD. 'PHONE: BM 2685+
195807.1455047582.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/02/09 19:53 by kennettj