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196107 [2016/02/23 10:39]
tyreless
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 The lost 1 1/2 hours put any thought of getting through that day quite out of reasonable reckoning, but once on the track I clung tenaciously to it, passing at 10.0 o'clock the side spur to Mt. Wirraba and Wollerie Creek I had travelled before (after all, I had wanted for years to see where the track got to). The lost 1 1/2 hours put any thought of getting through that day quite out of reasonable reckoning, but once on the track I clung tenaciously to it, passing at 10.0 o'clock the side spur to Mt. Wirraba and Wollerie Creek I had travelled before (after all, I had wanted for years to see where the track got to).
  
-Yes, I clung to that track, which continued reasonably strong and clearn on to the ridge south of, and parallel to, the Wirraba Range: then swung more to the south, once descended obligingly to the head of a creek, climbed again on to the ridge and to my amazement - plunged right down into the bed of a creek flowing south east and began to chase it downstream. I know now that it was here I lost contact with the map. I believed I was on an unnamed stream which flows into the Wollerie about 2 1/2 miles below the junction of Putty Creek: instead it could only be Gobo Creek, which takes a much more southerly course and ultimately joins the Wollerie opposite the northern side of the Culoul Range.+Yes, I clung to that track, which continued reasonably strong and clear on to the ridge south of, and parallel to, the Wirraba Range: then swung more to the south, once descended obligingly to the head of a creek, climbed again on to the ridge and to my amazement - plunged right down into the bed of a creek flowing south east and began to chase it downstream. I know now that it was here I lost contact with the map. I believed I was on an unnamed stream which flows into the Wollerie about 2 1/2 miles below the junction of Putty Creek: instead it could only be Gobo Creek, which takes a much more southerly course and ultimately joins the Wollerie opposite the northern side of the Culoul Range.
  
 The track remained alongside the creek far over a hour, until about 3.0 o'clock when I was smugly expecting to come to Wollerie any time, it turned away __UP__ a side stream entering from the north. Hereabouts the canvas of the left sandshoe ripped right across: at least, watching its slow disintegration had given me time to think out a possible repair. I removed the lace from the two bottom eyelets, used my tin opener to bore holes in the still sound rubber of the toe cap and strung a niece of tent cord like two reins from the cap back to the eyelets. It worked, and in ten minutes I was mobile again, pursuing the track up through a little swamp on to a ridge. Then it dived dawn into the next valley to the north, which I assessed (wrong) as Dumbell Creek. The track remained alongside the creek far over a hour, until about 3.0 o'clock when I was smugly expecting to come to Wollerie any time, it turned away __UP__ a side stream entering from the north. Hereabouts the canvas of the left sandshoe ripped right across: at least, watching its slow disintegration had given me time to think out a possible repair. I removed the lace from the two bottom eyelets, used my tin opener to bore holes in the still sound rubber of the toe cap and strung a niece of tent cord like two reins from the cap back to the eyelets. It worked, and in ten minutes I was mobile again, pursuing the track up through a little swamp on to a ridge. Then it dived dawn into the next valley to the north, which I assessed (wrong) as Dumbell Creek.
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 Here, at last, I mislaid the trail, which must go up and over yet another ridge, possibly over two, before coming to Wollerie Creek somewhere near Putty Creek. I can't say I regretted losing the trail. By this time I was heartily sick of its intransigence. Surely Putty stockmen must have spent years seeking the most roundabout course between Wollerie Creek and Uraterer. I went on down "Dumbell Creek" - (actually the unnamed stream which I fancied I'd been on before!) and found the going fair, but with piles of slippery rocks in places. At 5.25 having given myself another 10 minutes before sitting down to camp, I waked out on to a sandbar overlooking Wollemi Creek and, as I hastily made camp in the failing light, marvelled at the wild nature of the valley thereabouts. (Of course I thought I was only a mile below Putty Creek and civilisation, instead of something like three miles.) Here, at last, I mislaid the trail, which must go up and over yet another ridge, possibly over two, before coming to Wollerie Creek somewhere near Putty Creek. I can't say I regretted losing the trail. By this time I was heartily sick of its intransigence. Surely Putty stockmen must have spent years seeking the most roundabout course between Wollerie Creek and Uraterer. I went on down "Dumbell Creek" - (actually the unnamed stream which I fancied I'd been on before!) and found the going fair, but with piles of slippery rocks in places. At 5.25 having given myself another 10 minutes before sitting down to camp, I waked out on to a sandbar overlooking Wollemi Creek and, as I hastily made camp in the failing light, marvelled at the wild nature of the valley thereabouts. (Of course I thought I was only a mile below Putty Creek and civilisation, instead of something like three miles.)
  
-I had never proposed to go out via Putty Volley. That would entail walking 10 miles almost north before getting out on to the Singleton Road and would place me probably 25 miles north from the car back at Culoul. My plan was to strike generally east, allow a bit of a curve north to get around a deep part of Long Wheehy Creek, then firmly east to intersect the road.+I had never proposed to go out via Putty Volley. That would entail walking 10 miles almost north before getting out on to the Singleton Road and would place me probably 25 miles north from the car back at Culoul. My plan was to strike generally east, allow a bit of a curve north to get around a deep part of Long Wheeny Creek, then firmly east to intersect the road.
  
 This was still my plot on Thursday morning, which was very misty with visibility down to 100 yards or less. Worse, the mist rose as I went up the eastern wall of Wollerie Creek on a steady grade. I kept trying to detour to the north east, each time finding the ground falling away and finally, with no view of the landscape, decided to keep going with the rise of the ground. This was still my plot on Thursday morning, which was very misty with visibility down to 100 yards or less. Worse, the mist rose as I went up the eastern wall of Wollerie Creek on a steady grade. I kept trying to detour to the north east, each time finding the ground falling away and finally, with no view of the landscape, decided to keep going with the rise of the ground.
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 =====Day Walks.===== =====Day Walks.=====
  
-|July 16|Palm Beach - ferry to The Basin - West Head Road - Cottage Rock - Yeoman's Bay - The Basin. 12 miles. A 600' climb out of, and later, back into the Basin. Excellent views out over Pittwater and the lower Hawkesbury River. 8.12 a.m. bus from Wyward Square to Palm Beach (Goddards Wharf). 10.0 a.m. ferry Goddard's Wharf to The Basin. Fares: 8/2d. return bus to Palm Beach, plus 4/- return by ferry. Maps: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Stuart Brooks.|+|July 16|Palm Beach - ferry to The Basin - West Head Road - Cottage Rock - Yeoman's Bay - The Basin. 12 miles. A 600' climb out of, and later, back into the Basin. Excellent views out over Pittwater and the lower Hawkesbury River. 8.12 a.m. bus from Wynyard Square to Palm Beach (Goddards Wharf). 10.0 a.m. ferry Goddard's Wharf to The Basin. Fares: 8/2d. return bus to Palm Beach, plus 4/- return by ferry. Maps: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Stuart Brooks.|
 |July 23|Hornsby - bus to Crossland's Road - Knight Trig. - Charlton's Creek - Birrilee. Don't let the short distance fool you. Interesting country to find one's way through, but gaiters or slacks recommended. NOT SUITABLE as a first walk. Train: 8.40 a.m. Central Electric Station to Hornsby via Bridge. Tickets: Hornsby Return via Bridge at 5/3d. plus about 6/- bus fares. Maps: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: David Ingram.| |July 23|Hornsby - bus to Crossland's Road - Knight Trig. - Charlton's Creek - Birrilee. Don't let the short distance fool you. Interesting country to find one's way through, but gaiters or slacks recommended. NOT SUITABLE as a first walk. Train: 8.40 a.m. Central Electric Station to Hornsby via Bridge. Tickets: Hornsby Return via Bridge at 5/3d. plus about 6/- bus fares. Maps: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: David Ingram.|
 |July 30|Wondabyne - Kariong - Koolewong. 10 miles. A bit early for the wildflowers which abound in this area, but the surroundings will make up for that. An excellent view from Kariong Trig. Well worth the extra rail fare. Train: 8.15 a.m. Gosford train from Central Steam Station. Tickets: Koolewong Return at 15/6d. Maps: Gosford Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Reg Meakins.| |July 30|Wondabyne - Kariong - Koolewong. 10 miles. A bit early for the wildflowers which abound in this area, but the surroundings will make up for that. An excellent view from Kariong Trig. Well worth the extra rail fare. Train: 8.15 a.m. Gosford train from Central Steam Station. Tickets: Koolewong Return at 15/6d. Maps: Gosford Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Reg Meakins.|
-|August 6|Pymble - bus to St. Ives (Douglas Street) Bungaroo - Middle Harbour Creek - Lindfield. 11 miles. This used to be a favourite walk, but hasn't been progrmmed for years. A scramble along the upper reaches of Middle Harbour Creek, then mainly track. Lindfield Park is an attractive setting for tea. Train: 8.10 a.m. Central Electric Station to Pymble. Tickets: Pymble Return at 5/3d. plus 1/- bus fare. Maps: Sydney Military or any good suburban street Directory. Leader: Molly Rodgers.|+|August 6|Pymble - bus to St. Ives (Douglas Street) Bungaroo - Middle Harbour Creek - Lindfield. 11 miles. This used to be a favourite walk, but hasn't been programmed for years. A scramble along the upper reaches of Middle Harbour Creek, then mainly track. Lindfield Park is an attractive setting for tea. Train: 8.10 a.m. Central Electric Station to Pymble. Tickets: Pymble Return at 5/3d. plus 1/- bus fare. Maps: Sydney Military or any good suburban street Directory. Leader: Molly Rodgers.|
 |August 13|Leumeah - Bushwalkers' Basin - Kalibucca Pool - Freer's Crossing - Minto. Bushwalkers' Basin is a splendid pool and Punchbowl Creek, leading to Kalibucca Pool, is largely unspoilt. There could be some attractive colour shots of the wattle in flower at this time of the year. Train: 8.25 a.m. Goulburn train from Central Steam Station. Tickets: Leumeah Return at 7/-. Map: Camden Military. Leader: Jack Gentle.| |August 13|Leumeah - Bushwalkers' Basin - Kalibucca Pool - Freer's Crossing - Minto. Bushwalkers' Basin is a splendid pool and Punchbowl Creek, leading to Kalibucca Pool, is largely unspoilt. There could be some attractive colour shots of the wattle in flower at this time of the year. Train: 8.25 a.m. Goulburn train from Central Steam Station. Tickets: Leumeah Return at 7/-. Map: Camden Military. Leader: Jack Gentle.|
  
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 201 Castlereagh St Sydney BM2685 201 Castlereagh St Sydney BM2685
  
 +=====Letter From Dorothy Lawry In New Zealand.=====
 +
 +"95 St. Andrews Road, Epsom, Auckland, S.E.3, N.Z.
  
-LETTER FROM DOROTHY LAMY IN NEW ZEAL/AND. 
-"95 St. Andrews Road, 
-Epsom, 
-AUCICr,L.ND, S.E.3, N.Z. 
 I noticed from the list of officers and the walks programme that several of the Old and Bold are still doing yeoman work for the Club. It is also good to see plenty of the newer members' names on these lists. That is the way the Club keeps up its strength. I noticed from the list of officers and the walks programme that several of the Old and Bold are still doing yeoman work for the Club. It is also good to see plenty of the newer members' names on these lists. That is the way the Club keeps up its strength.
-By the way, I noticed that the iinnual Meetinf was told by our old friend, Brian Harvey, that the magazine had now come out regularly for 25 years. That takes it back to 1936, and that would be about the time it was turned into a monthly duplicated by our own members. You may be interested to know that it first started  in 1932, in May I think it was, at a 1-)ricc of 1/- and apTeared, every other month. Marj Hill first suggested it and the Club yr doubtful but g,lve -,ermissinn for us to publish a journal as a trial. Mar,' Hill, Brenda White, Renee Brown, Myles Dunphy and I each nut in 10/- and that was the capital on which "The Bush. Walker" was started. After about sixmonths the Club took the journal over officially, refunded us our ten bol:  and changed its name to "The Sydney BuShwalker". It went on quite happily for some time until there was a change of editor and the new sub-editor Used a blue pencil heavily on one or two issues. That nearly killed the journal; they tried turning it into a quarterly but still no one would write for it, and most people said it was too expensive and would not buy it. Bill Mullins came to the rescue by taking over the editorship, turning it into a monthly and dropping the price to (I think) 6d. or 9d. by getting a working team of members and duplicating it on the Club's own machine instead of having it done by a professional duplicating firm. Since then, as Brian said, it has come out regularly for 25 years. I thought you might be interested in that bit of the Club's history.+ 
 +By the way, I noticed that the Annual Meeting was told by our old friend, Brian Harvey, that the magazine had now come out regularly for 25 years. That takes it back to 1936, and that would be about the time it was turned into a monthly duplicated by our own members. You may be interested to know that it first started  in 1932, in May I think it was, at a price of 1/- and appeared every other month. Marj Hill first suggested it and the Club was doubtful but gave permission for us to publish a journal as a trial. Marj Hill, Brenda White, Renee Brown, Myles Dunphy and I each put in 10/- and that was the capital on which "The Bush.Walker" was started. After about six months the Club took the journal over officially, refunded us our ten bob and changed its name to "The Sydney Bushwalker". It went on quite happily for some time until there was a change of editor and the new sub-editor used a blue pencil heavily on one or two issues. That nearly killed the journal; they tried turning it into a quarterly but still no one would write for it, and most people said it was too expensive and would not buy it. Bill Mullins came to the rescue by taking over the editorship, turning it into a monthly and dropping the price to (I think) 6d. or 9d. by getting a working team of members and duplicating it on the Club's own machine instead of having it done by a professional duplicating firm. Since then, as Brian said, it has come out regularly for 25 years. I thought you might be interested in that bit of the Club's history. 
 Best wishes to your all, Best wishes to your all,
 +
 Yours sincerely, Yours sincerely,
 +
 Dorothy Lawry." Dorothy Lawry."
-THE LUG NEEKEND+ 
-Roy Craggs' Cloudmaker Tiwilla trip attracted about 18 starters. +=====The Long Weekend.===== 
-OOOOOO   + 
-A Colley - Leyden party of seven did some scrub bashing in the Putty - Monundilla area. AnS.B.W. party in 1953 took two e rws to traverse the c=tremely tricky saath ridge between Eindarun and Monunc:Ii11R. This can now be done in four +Roy Craggs' Cloudmaker Tiwilla trip attracted about 18 starters. 
- hours walking along a Fire Trail. However, the above .,;11-ty spent a r.:!rly and a half pushing along the less tricky but equally dry an', scratchy North ridge system before they found the Trail which branches near Ifonunilla and reaches civilisation + 
-via Ccridudgy or Martindale. Weather not the best - rain and mist. +---- 
-George Gray's party, bound for the Back,-of-the-Castle area via the Vines, holed up in the cave near Castle Hill because of poor weather. +  
-IMEND WALKS. +A Colley - Leyden party of seven did some scrub bashing in the Putty - Monundilla area. An S.B.W. party in 1953 took two days to traverse the extremely tricky south ridge between Kindarun and Monundilla. This can now be done in four hours walking along a Fire Trail. However, the above party spent a day and a half pushing along the less tricky but equally dry and scratchy North ridge system before they found the Trail which branches near Monundilla and reaches civilisation via Coricudgy or Martindale. Weather not the best - rain and mist. 
-17. + 
-JULY 21-22-23 +---- 
-Combined walk with Y.H.A.C.C. + 
-B1ackheath0Cox Turnoff Can.'s River - Billy Healy Hill - Black Jerry's - Devil's Hole - Katoomba. +George Gray's party, bound for the Back-of-the-Castle area via the Vines, holed up in the cave near Castle Hill because of poor weather. 
-Varied river scenery. See the rugged granites of the Billy Healy - Gibraltar Creek area. + 
-Steep track walk up Black Jerry's Adge, pleasant ramble through Megalong, are final steep track through the Devil's Hole. Maps: Blue Mountains and Burragorang Tourist +---- 
-Katoomba MJTtary. + 
-Leader: Frank Young. +=====Bowen Bash (I'm orright Jack).===== 
-JULY 28-29-30 Blackheath - Car to Cox's River via Little Hartley - Cox's River - Megaiong Creek - Devil's Hole - Katoomba. + 
-This trip follows Cox 's River (beautiful river scenery) to the Megalong Creek junction. Medium w,said_r until the Billy Healy bend where rock hoppinf f. 021Ci sornmbling. +Stuart Brooks
-Then scramble up tiTourh the lavalon,-. Creek fore (siDectacular cascades over Franites) to IreE.. 11on Step climb out via Devil's Hole. + 
-Yaps: Blue Mountains :71.177 BurraccranE Tourist. +[Page 15 missing] 
-Katoomba + 
-. Leader: CreF r3nnnn. +More scratching around in the creek bed unearthed a comfortable sand spit. As this was a place obviously infested with all kinds of snakes, precautionary methods were duly taken while dinner was being assembled (and after). Dinner was garnished with legal anecdotes from Paul, and some free legal advice to those of us unfortunate enough to have had brushes with the law. Pete and Reg gave valuable advice, inter alia, on the many chemical problems that beset one day by day. Contributions from Grennan and Brooks were more mundane. 
-AUGUST 4,5-6 Bell - Grose River Victoria Falls - Mt. Victoria. + 
-(This will be a two-day walk, not 3-day as shown on the programme.Rugged creek bash down the Grose from.2ell to the Victoria Falls Creek, then easier going to the Falls, and climb out from the valley. Gaiters recommended+After breakfast and the traditional dumping of surplus food and equipment (buried, of course) we took off straight up the eastern wall of the gorge. From the ridge on the previous night this had looked fairly formidable, but the rock walls were well broken up and it was possible to find negotiable routes without trouble. The ridge actually went up in two 600' leaps, separated by half-a-mile of level going. From the top a really magnificent scene unfolded. Price's technique of changing socks at this stage was quite unnecessary as the panorama really demanded a protracted viewing. Below, the deep, narrow Bowen Creek gorge led the eye 10 miles southwards to Mt. Irvine, and 3 miles northwards to the Wollangambe junction, beyond which, in gradually deepening blue, was row upon row of ridges of the Colo country. On either side of our airy perch were 600' deep gullies leading sharply dawn to Bowen's Creek. 
-Map: Kntoomba + 
-Leader: WiIf Hader. +Reluctantly we turned our backs on all this and headed alone the now level ridge leading around to Big Hill. 
-AUGUST U-12-13 Wolgan WI -Ley - Annie Rowan'sCreek Geetah Creek - Old Coach Road - Wolgan Valley+
-(Private Transport fair dirt road into the Valley through the spectacular Wolgan Gap:) +
-Explore the old shale mining town of Newness Pleasant track walk down the Wolgan to Annie Rowan's Clearing, roughish climb Out on to the tons. and return. to: Ne-wnes via. the Old Coach Road.. (Note: Interesting alternative return route would be the old railway formation, with its cuttings,  embanlonents and tunnels. ) +
-Leader: Dnvid Brown. +
-wwilw mummor +
-Katoomba Council is reported to favour th erection of a Snowless Sid Run  at Katooraba. There'll be a few skinless Sid runners e.,roun:1 too, we should think. +
-16. +
-More scratching around in the creek bed unearthed a comfortable sand spit. As this was a place obviously infested with all kinds of snakes, precautionary methods were duly taken while dinner was being assembled (and after). Dinner was garnished with legal anecdotes from Paul, and some free legal advice to those of us unfortunate enough to hate had brushes with the law. Pete and Reg gave valuable advice, inter alia, on the many chemical problems that beset one day by day. Contributions from Grennan and Brooks were more mundane. +
-After breakfast and the traditional dampihg of surplus food and equipment (buried, of course) we took off straight up the eastern wall of the EorEe. From the ridge on the previous night this had looked fairly formidable, but the rock walls were well broken up and it was possfble to find negotiable routes without trouble. The ridge actually went 12,) in two 600' leaps, separated by half-a-mile of level going. From the top a really magnificent scene unfolded. Price's technique of changing socks at this stage was asuite unnecessary as the panorama really demanded a protracted viewing. Belo*, the deep, narrow Bowen Creek gorge led the eye 10 miles southwards to Mt. Irvine, and 3 miles northwards to the Wollangambe junction, beyond which, in gradually deepening blue, Was row upon row of ridges of the Colo country. On either side of our airy perch were 600' deep gullies leading sharply dawn to Bowen's Creek. +
-Reluctantly we turned cur backs on all this and headed alone the now level ridge leading around to Big Hill.+
 Near midday we found with a little effort a spring about 100' below the top of the ridge just short of Big Hill, and had a pleasant lunch garnished with more legal anecdotes of Paul's. Near midday we found with a little effort a spring about 100' below the top of the ridge just short of Big Hill, and had a pleasant lunch garnished with more legal anecdotes of Paul's.
-Immediately after lurch, we came across a well warn bush road obviously coming from HtTootle, but going where? Dropping our packs, we followed it for three miles along a ridge towards Blacksaith's Creek, where it ended at a timber-Eetter's camp. A bulldozer track plumnetted onwards and downwards towards the creek but time prevented further investigation. The sole occupant of the camp, obviously a victim of snake fright, had dosed heavily on the recommended precautionary treatment and was snoring happily and loudly in a nearby bus-cum-caravan and was thus unavailable for comment as to the camp' activities. In this state of ignorance we re-trated our steps to Big Hill and bashed the five miles back to Mt. Tootie. + 
-By careful timing we were just able to make Marrajong before it was turned off. - Appendix+Immediately after lurch, we came across a well worn bush road obviously coming from MtTootie, but going where? Dropping our packs, we followed it for three miles along a ridge towards Blacksmith's Creek, where it ended at a timber-getter's camp. A bulldozer track plummetted onwards and downwards towards the creek but time prevented further investigation. The sole occupant of the camp, obviously a victim of snake fright, had dosed heavily on the recommended precautionary treatment and was snoring happily and loudly in a nearby bus-cum-caravan and was thus unavailable for comment as to the camp'activities. In this state of ignorance we re-traced our steps to Big Hill and bashed the five miles back to Mt. Tootie. 
-The following prescription for )revention of snake bite is largely a result + 
-of research done by Gilroy, who does, however, admit some assistance from an Arunta witch-doctor. Many subsequent trials have proved, without doubt, its efficacy. +By careful timing we were just able to make Kurrajong before it was turned off. 
-Take 1 fl oz. aqua forte or aqua ignis (these are available from my pharmacy A cheaper substitute, preferred by many with a thrifty trend, can be found in the form of whisky or (shudder) rum - if you can stand the taste.) Add 1 gm. citric acid (or 6 drops lemon juice at a pinch), stir in 5 grms. sucrose (or 1 teasnoon sugar, if handy), add 2 floz. aqua pura at 140F. (hot water might just do). Stir slowly. Sip slowly. If doUbtful, repeat. (I'm orright Jack.) + 
-+__Appendix.__ 
-18+ 
-FIRE =S+The following prescription for prevention of snake bite is largely a result of research done by Gilroy, who does, however, admit some assistance from an Arunta witch-doctor. Many subsequent trials have proved, without doubt, its efficacy. 
-(Reported from various recent walks,)+ 
 +Take 1 fl oz. aqua forte or aqua ignis (these are available from my pharmacyA cheaper substitute, preferred by many with a thrifty trend, can be found in the form of whisky or (shudder) rum - if you can stand the taste.) Add 1 gm. citric acid (or 6 drops lemon juice at a pinch), stir in 5 grms. sucrose (or 1 teaspoon sugar, if handy), add 2 floz. aqua pura at 140°F. (hot water might just do). Stir slowly. Sip slowly. If doubtful, repeat. (I'm orright Jack.) 
 + 
 +=====Weekend Walks.===== 
 + 
 +|July 21-22-23|Combined walk with Y.H.A.C.C. B1ackheath- Cox Turnoff - Cox's River - Billy Healy Hill - Black Jerry's - Devil's Hole - Katoomba. Varied river scenery. See the rugged granites of the Billy Healy - Gibraltar Creek area. Steep track walk up Black Jerry's ridge, pleasant ramble through Megalong, are final steep track through the Devil's Hole. Maps: Blue Mountains and Burragorang Tourist, Katoomba Military. Leader: Frank Young.| 
 +|July 28-29-30|Blackheath - Car to Cox's River via Little Hartley - Cox's River - Megalong Creek - Devil's Hole - Katoomba. This trip follows Cox's River (beautiful river scenery) to the Megalong Creek junction. Medium walking until the Billy Healy bend where rock hopping and scrambling. Then scramble up through the Megalong Creek gorge (spectacular cascades over granites) to Megalong Valley. Steep climb out via Devil's Hole. Maps: Blue Mountains and Burragorang Tourist. Katoomba Military. Leader: Greg Grennan.| 
 +|August 4-5-6|Bell - Grose River - Victoria Falls - Mt. Victoria. (This will be a two-day walk, not 3-day as shown on the programme.) Rugged creek bash down the Grose from Bell to the Victoria Falls Creek, then easier going to the Falls, and climb out from the valley. Gaiters recommended. Map: Katoomba Military. Leader: Wilf Hilder.| 
 +|August 11-12-13|Wolgan Valley - Annie Rowan's Creek - Geetah Creek - Old Coach Road - Wolgan Valley. (Private Transport - fair dirt road into the Valley through the spectacular Wolgan Gap.) Explore the old shale mining town of Newness. Pleasant track walk down the Wolgan to Annie Rowan's Clearing, roughish climb out on to the tops and return to Newnes via the Old Coach Road. (Note: Interesting alternative return route would be the old railway formation, with its cuttings,  embankments and tunnels.) Leader: David Brown.| 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Katoomba Council is reported to favour the erection of a Snowless Ski Run  at Katoomba. There'll be a few skinless ski runners around too, we should think. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Fire Trails.===== 
 + 
 +(Reported from various recent walks.) 
 The construction of fire trails has been noted in the following areas:- The construction of fire trails has been noted in the following areas:-
-ST. IVES from the end of Warrimoo Road through Kuringai Chase in a northerly direction to a point nem- the head of salt water in Cowan Creek. 
-KURINGAI CHASE from a point above the junction of Kuringai and Cowan (fresh water section) Creeks to the Mona Vale Road at Torrey Hills running close to Ryland Trig. 
-MEGALONG VA=" branching off the road to Carlon's Farm just near the top of the hill up from Megalong Creek. The sign reads "Fire Trail tq Eedlow Gap". The 
-road continues around the cliff line, over Galong Creek, past Carlon's Head, Where the direction signs to Carlon's Head and to Carlon's Farm have already been damaged by vandals. It then crosses "Sliprail" and Breakfast (known to us as Glen Alan) Creeks, and continues up into liedlow Gap. At that point a notice proclaims a helicopter landing area and signposts direct to Kedumba, Kowmung, Black Dog, White Dog and Cox's River. The trail continues Up over the Shoulder to Mt. MOuln, but, as our party was b,und for Splendour Rock, we branched off on to the track to Et. Warrigal etc. The grades and curves on thLs road are a hazard for two wheel drive vehicles.  In fact the grade up la. Nbuin is marked "Four Wheel Drive Vehicles only" and, in wet weather, parts of the road become boggy 
-enough to be difficult for even this type of transport". 
-ON THE BONNY BANKS OF THE GROSE. 
-During a chance conversation the other day the Conservation Secretary learned that there was land for sale at Grose Wold, on the banks of the Grose River. Just what we wanted to buy with the Era Fund. 139 acres, with a:1958 V.G. of 500! So off went Brian Harvey, Alex Colley and John White on Sunday, 2nd July, complete with cut lunches and thermos  flasks. They soon found the block, which proved to 
-have a very fine stand of re-growth trees at the top end, just alongside the last farm before going down the rough track towards Woods Creek Camp. As the block went 
-down a gully developed, merging into a beautiful valley at the foot with wattles and green grass, reminiscent of the wattle groves at Eureka Clearing. Enough for a re-union mob of 200, with tons of firewood up the hill. There was an ancient house 
-on a rocky shelf, very much the worse for vandalism and white ants. The old slab walls mould provide a good camp fire. Round the house jonquils were coming into blossom - fragrant flowers at the tent door, just like home. The creek in the gully was dry - probably only runs after rain. Nhat more could one ask? It was 
-just what we've been waiting for for years. After lunch, the party had a yarn with the farming bod up at the top. Yes, the 11.nd was up for sale all right, and now in the hands of a local estate agent. He had heard, and this has now been confirmed, that an offer of 6,000 had been made. 
-The party cooled off in a violent thunderstorm on the way home. 
  
 +__St. Ives__ from the end of Warrimoo Road through Kuringai Chase in a northerly direction to a point near the head of salt water in Cowan Creek.
 +
 +__Kuringai Chase__ from a point above the junction of Kuringai and Cowan (fresh water section) Creeks to the Mona Vale Road at Terrey Hills running close to Ryland Trig.
 +
 +__Megalong Valley__ branching off the road to Carlon's Farm just near the top of the hill up from Megalong Creek. The sign reads "Fire Trail to Medlow Gap". The road continues around the cliff line, over Galong Creek, past Carlon's Head, where the direction signs to Carlon's Head and to Carlon's Farm have already been damaged by vandals. It then crosses "Sliprail" and Breakfast (known to us as Glen Alan) Creeks, and continues up into Medlow Gap. At that point a notice proclaims a helicopter landing area and signposts direct to Kedumba, Kowmung, Black Dog, White Dog and Cox's River. The trail continues up over the shoulder to Mt. Mouin, but, as our party was bound for Splendour Rock, we branched off on to the track to Mt. Warrigal etc. The grades and curves on this road are a hazard for two wheel drive vehicles.  In fact the grade up Mt. Mouin is marked "Four Wheel Drive Vehicles only" and, in wet weather, parts of the road become boggy enough to be difficult for even this type of transport".
 +
 +=====On The Bonny Banks Of The Grose.=====
 +
 +During a chance conversation the other day the Conservation Secretary learned that there was land for sale at Grose Wold, on the banks of the Grose River. Just what we wanted to buy with the Era Fund. 139 acres, with a 1958 V.G. of £500! So off went Brian Harvey, Alex Colley and John White on Sunday, 2nd July, complete with cut lunches and thermos  flasks. They soon found the block, which proved to have a very fine stand of re-growth trees at the top end, just alongside the last farm before going down the rough track towards Woods Creek Camp. As the block went down a gully developed, merging into a beautiful valley at the foot with wattles and green grass, reminiscent of the wattle groves at Euroka Clearing. Enough for a re-union mob of 200, with tons of firewood up the hill. There was an ancient house on a rocky shelf, very much the worse for vandalism and white ants. The old slab walls would provide a good camp fire. Round the house jonquils were coming into blossom - fragrant flowers at the tent door, just like home. The creek in the gully was dry - probably only runs after rain. What more could one ask? It was just what we've been waiting for for years. After lunch, the party had a yarn with the farming bod up at the top. Yes, the land was up for sale all right, and now in the hands of a local estate agent. He had heard, and this has now been confirmed, that an offer of £6,000 had been made.
 +
 +The party cooled off in a violent thunderstorm on the way home.
196107.1456184350.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/02/23 10:39 by tyreless