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196301 [2015/12/14 15:51]
tyreless
196301 [2016/01/14 08:30] (current)
tyreless
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 =====The Sydney Bushwalker===== =====The Sydney Bushwalker=====
  
-A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalker, +A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalker, The N.S.W. Nurses' Association Rooms "Northcote Building," Reiby Place, Sydney. Box No. 4476 G.P.O. Sydney.
-The N.S.W. Nurses' Association Rooms "Northcote Building," Reiby Place, Sydney. Box No. 4476 G.P.O. Sydney.+
  
 =====January 1963===== =====January 1963=====
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 The Nooroo Buttress is a 3,200 feet descent and overlooks Whalania Deep, the greatest declivity in the Blue Nhuntains. The buttress is extremely rocky. Some of the rocks are in the form of bluffs, others are loose and treacherous underfoot particularly when descending, while there is one spot a few hundred feet from the top where it is advisable to traverse to the left s(i.e. coming down) around the bluff. The buttress in places narrows into a jagged arete which overhangs Jenolan Creek, and to avoid sprained ankles or worse we veritably The Nooroo Buttress is a 3,200 feet descent and overlooks Whalania Deep, the greatest declivity in the Blue Nhuntains. The buttress is extremely rocky. Some of the rocks are in the form of bluffs, others are loose and treacherous underfoot particularly when descending, while there is one spot a few hundred feet from the top where it is advisable to traverse to the left s(i.e. coming down) around the bluff. The buttress in places narrows into a jagged arete which overhangs Jenolan Creek, and to avoid sprained ankles or worse we veritably
-felt our way down this awesome ridge. The sun was behind us, the views were tremendous, and cameras clicked furiously. As we got further down +felt our way down this awesome ridge. The sun was behind us, the views were tremendous, and cameras clicked furiously. As we got further down we could look back and upwards at the grey monster we had climbed down. There were also wonderful views of the Falls in Davies Canyon on Sally Camp Creek and of an un-named waterfall in Jenolan Creek. The buttress widens towards the bottom and becomes an open forest of oaks and gums with verdant Dilwinnia growing abundantly under the trees.
-we could look back and upwards at the grey monster we had climbed down. There were also wonderful views of the Falls in Davies Canyon on Sally Camp Creek and of an un-named waterfall in Jenolan Creek. The buttress widens towards the bottom and becomes an open forest of oaks and gums with verdant Dilwinnia growing abundantly under the trees.+
  
 we reached the idyllic little clearing at the junction of Jenolan Creek and the Kanangra River at 1535. After resting and refreshing ourselves for 20 minutes we set out for Konangaroo, where we arrived at 1745 just on dusk and just when Peter was thinking we wouldn't get in until Sunday. On the way down the river we had a look at the Norbert Carlon plaque, which is rather hard to find. we reached the idyllic little clearing at the junction of Jenolan Creek and the Kanangra River at 1535. After resting and refreshing ourselves for 20 minutes we set out for Konangaroo, where we arrived at 1745 just on dusk and just when Peter was thinking we wouldn't get in until Sunday. On the way down the river we had a look at the Norbert Carlon plaque, which is rather hard to find.
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 =====Good Walking Country===== =====Good Walking Country=====
  
-Taken frOdm an article on "GOod Malang Country" by S.P.B. Mais+Taken from an article on "Good Walking Country" by S.P.B. Maisthe noted commentator on the British countryside, published in "Coming Events in Britain" dated November 1960. 
-the noted c6mmentator on the British countryside, published in "Coming Events in Britain" dated November 1960. + 
-nihy walk? Max Beerbohm said that wglking stops the brain. Perhaps that explains-why I like it. It iflay stop-the brain, but it releasespent-t-ip emotions and, a-dcording to Sir George Trevelyan, is better for the body than any doctor.+"Why walk?Max Beerbohm said that walking stops the brain. Perhaps that explains why I like it. It iflay stop-the brain, but it releases pent-up emotions and, according to Sir George Trevelyan, is better for the body than any doctor. 
 "I have," he once wrote, "two doctors, my right leg and my left." "I have," he once wrote, "two doctors, my right leg and my left."
-Only by-walking will you discover th6t 61usive aspect of Britain, which is not to be found in the cities or on the Queen's Highway, but in the qiiiet greeh lanes where once the ancient tribes carried their wares, the Roman legions marched,-the pilgrims seat, and the-smuLzlers crept stealthily with their contraband ''brandy for the parson, 'baccy for the clerk"+ 
-Walking is a fine art: It does n:cit come naturally. The child has to learn how to walk, and so does the grown-up wayfarer. +Only by walking will you discover that elusive aspect of Britain, which is not to be found in the cities or on the Queen's Highway, but in the quiet green lanes where once the ancient tribes carried their wares, the Roman legions marched, the pilgrims sang, and the smugglers crept stealthily with their contraband "brandy for the parson, 'baccy for the clerk". 
-First y6du have to learn to loiter. To enjoy walking you thus leavd your watCh a home and walk by the -Sun. There must be no schedule, fin determination to arrive at a-particular place at a particular time. "nu must for- - get time and cunt not the milestones but the heart-beats. You must learn to yield always to the temptation whic in "Pilgrim's Progress" led Christian lilt By-Path Meadow-and the Castle of Giant Despair. Our by-paths lead to treasures -which otherwise might so easily remain unseen. + 
-Myer walk with the-people who caril their iiicome tax problems andhydrogeri bomb fears along with them. You say goodbye to all that if you walk along as William Hazlitt walked ("I am never lesg alone than when alone"),-or else with a very carefully c5ose5 companion. You walk to find Ydnurgelftheost pleasant companiori you a:tie-ever likely to meet, and not to listen to the tinkling cymbal of at irrelevant tongue.  +Walking is a fine art: It does not come naturally. The child has to learn how to walk, and so does the grown-up wayfarer. 
-To enjq'y' malang, there mast be silence to enable you to h6ar not ohly the songs of-the larks overhead, 'mit the rustle of the fox in the covert and the stoat in the hedge"...i.... + 
-....   Imw +First you have to learn to loiter. To enjoy walking you thus leave your watch at home and walk by the sun. There must be no schedule, no determination to arrive at a particular place at a particular time. You must forget time and count not the milestones but the heart-beats. You must learn to yield always to the temptation which in "Pilgrim's Progress" led Christian into By-Path Meadow and the Castle of Giant Despair. Our by-paths lead to treasures which otherwise might so easily remain unseen. 
-At beauty I am nest a star, + 
-There are many more handsome by far. But my face, I don't mind it, +Never walk with the people who carry their income tax problems and hydrogen bomb fears along with them. You say goodbye to all that if you walk along as William Hazlitt walked ("I am never less alone than when alone"), or else with a very carefully chosen companion. You walk to find yourselfthe most pleasant companion you are ever likely to meet, and not to listen to the tinkling cymbal of at irrelevant tongue....
-I am-behind itl+ 
 +To enjoy walking, there mast be silence to enable you to hear not only the songs of the larks overhead, but the rustle of the fox in the covert and the stoat in the hedge...... 
 + 
 +At beauty I am not a star,\\ 
 +There are many more handsome by far.\\ 
 +But my face, I don't mind it,\\ 
 +I am behind it!\\
 The ones in front get the jar. The ones in front get the jar.
-December 1962 The Sydney Bushwalker 17 
-THE TIN CANOE TRIP 
-fluc rey Kenwny. 
-- It all started as-an idea dreaMed up on the long weekr-end in 06to6er, when several of us went along the Turnn River from Capertee to Sofala-and Hill End. The River wag just at the'richt-height, the damping looked perfect all the may alonL;, and we fun d some specks nf gold-to add interest. Bob said-it wnuld be hice -to do the whole River by bat. We could carry-it acrss the Shallow spots. 18ob then suggested we could built a tin canoe in no time for very little cost, and the whole party got carried away with the idea. 
-S." 
-After a lot of paper work:and research a plan of a Canoe-was produced. The idea of tin was rather g shock to the cane 
-they added their advice anyway, and ti7tro of them even agreed to come on the-trip. They tactfully said they would bring their own standai'd canoes. The next thing we sdw was the skeleton of the first-canoe 1-kihi6h 33?)1) had put to-gether after hours at mnrk, and then brought hnt*on t5p of Roy Cragg's car.- The size was the first thing th6t impressed everyone. He bad said-it woad be 17 feet long and should hold fur peop16 and gear, and most people had been very doubtful if aw tin canoe would tele that many.--However, when-we saw it we realised this was no ordinary boat. The framework:had been very cai"efully put together and galvanised, and it was still quite light enoqh t6 handle. At this stage everyf=me was new to the job, and each stage took longer than-ve expected. It stopped traffic when seveh of us carried the whole boat 6ut on tn the fnot)ath to wrap 
-it tin /4nund it It t-,nk all 6f us to-hold it while-an electric diifl was brciught out throUgh the front nf-the-houge dnd the holes drilled for the - 
-first rivets and screws, Then Roy got to work with the solder; Juld the-b at began to take -Shape, The ends caused some troub16, as it is tint east to 
-dhape these parts without causing kinks in thu iron. After s.)rting out thee pr5blems things vent along Cjuicklyi r1-1d by the second-week-end two canoes, one with a tin shell and one at the first stage, were in.-the backyard. - The gins were basy painting and hci'.ding the boats steady, dabbing acid on the soldering jobs, and-generally acting as carpenters'and 
-pluMBers' offsiderg. The big moment for launching -the first boat came, and 
-we found two men could lift the finished boat on top of a car, so the estimated weight was about right. 
-The-Parramatta River coilies in fairly close -to where the boats were being 
-built; so we carried the canoe damn to the mangrove flats, and 'frnd the tide half out. Luaily there is a stoi'm water canal running in Illerg the vatgr was deeper, so we slid the boat do.5n the bank and saved 6 long tramp across the fflud, with the possibility of losing several members of the party. With six of us ein board the canoe floated just right, and was steadier than we had even hoped. 
-The Sydney Bishwalker January 1963 
-- 
-Liter worki_ng nut the weiLtt nf-the average persnn ane.-the-w-eight of the gear it was decided that six of us equalled a fiarty with packs, so all appears well. Keith Renwick had worked out food and-gear lists to the ounce. 39,y-next week,-end-there will be three canoes in the s 7ard with seven people rushirig round trying to finish them in time to put on the train in tiMe fnr the Christmas trip. We don't know -which train as yet, as rivei4s ai4e a little doUbtful in this dry weather. We hope it will be one of the north coast rivers. Read the February Diacazine and find nut! 
-SCIE10EI NLTtJPLLlLY 
-The Pebble Game. 
-- If ever you are really stuck f6r something to do, talk someone intn-:playing the-pebble,O.me with you. Two players stand facing each other- 43=1 prdce on the ground between them-an odd number. of -,...)ebbles ,(say-.17)  Now,- in'. turn', they are-each allowed to pick up one, two  
-or three. pebbles as he Or she chooses. 
-, . . . 
-.The players continue this nerve-wracking process the 
-pebblps have been picked up.  
- The winner  is the one whn finishes up with-an ncY1 number , of pebbles; - This is reallj a sort of poor ltan's dnit-Tout'self OutwarclJound course. Apart from stimulatinF, mental exercise you get plenty - of physical-.activity pjicking up pebb15s (particalPrly-if you use -largo'. pebbles),-.".ou lea:1"n to make elit-sedond-deciions, let(rnselfr 
-contr51 (do the lolly and throw one of your rocks at your-oppnnent:' and you could easily wind up with an even number), ;I'4 above all you'll lgarn s elf-reliance (carry a spare pebble in your pocket and you can' lose). 
-Menura novae-hollandiae. 
-`1- Historians, strangely, neglect some iillportant events, being perhaps too deeply interegted in humari beings to consider the claims of wild - 
-ngture. Read almnst any history of Australia, and you are unlikely to find 
-more than a passing reference - if it be mentioned at all --t? the lyre-bird. 
-- Among dis6Overies in the early days of settlement at Port Jackson, 
-. nne is more notable than that mgde by an akploring pdrtyin'Jahuary, 1798. Cocts were members of t1e'min6r expedition which collected the first 
-known specimen of Menura novae-hollondiae, the superb lyre-bird. Generally 
-at the infant settledaent, the-strahce new bird was regardedas -a pheasant; the more learned onlAnists, however, believed it to be a Bird-of-Paradise. Naturalists were almost as puzzled by Menura as they were by the Platypus, when specimens reached England. 
  
 +=====The Tin Canoe Trip=====
 +
 +====Audrey Kenway====
 +
 +It all started as an idea dreamed up on the long week-end in October, when several of us went along the Turon River from Capertee to Sofala and Hill End. The River was just at the right height, the damping looked perfect all the way along, and we found some specks of gold to add interest. Bob said it would be nice to do the whole River by boat. We could carry it across the shallow spots. Bob then suggested we could build a tin canoe in no time for very little cost, and the whole party got carried away with the idea.
 +
 +After a lot of paper work and research a plan of a canoe was produced. The idea of tin was rather a shock to the canoe people, but they added their advice anyway, and two of them even agreed to come on the trip. They tactfully said they would bring their own standard canoes. The next thing we saw was the skeleton of the first canoe which Bob had put together after hours at work, and then brought home on top of Roy Cragg's car. The size was the first thing that impressed everyone. He bad said it would be 17 feet long and should hold four people and gear, and most people had been very doubtful if any tin canoe would take that many. However, when we saw it we realised this was no ordinary boat. The framework had been very carefully put together and galvanised, and it was still quite light enough to handle. At this stage everyone was new to the job, and each stage took longer than we expected. It stopped traffic when seven of us carried the whole boat out on to the footpath to wrap its tin round it. It took all of us to hold it while an electric drill was brought out through the front of the house and the holes drilled for the first rivets and screws. Then Roy got to work with the solder, and the boat began to take shape. The ends caused some trouble, as it is not easy to shape these parts without causing kinks in the iron. After sorting out thee problems things went along quickly, and by the second week-end two canoes, one with a tin shell and one at the first stage, were in the backyard. The girls were busy painting and holding the boats steady, dabbing acid on the soldering jobs, and generally acting as carpenters and plumbers' offsiders. The big moment for launching the first boat came, and we found two men could lift the finished boat on top of a car, so the estimated weight was about right.
 +
 +The Parramatta River comes in fairly close to where the boats were being built, so we carried the canoe down to the mangrove flats, and found the tide half out. Luckily there is a storm water canal running in where the water was deeper, so we slid the boat down the bank and saved a long tramp across the mud, with the possibility of losing several members of the party. With six of us on board the canoe floated just right, and was steadier than we had even hoped.
 +
 +After working out the weight of the average person and the weight of the gear it was decided that six of us equalled a party of four with packs, so all appears well. Keith Renwick had worked out food and gear lists to the ounce. By next week-end there will be three canoes in the yard with seven people rushing round trying to finish them in time to put on the train in time for the Christmas trip. We don't know which train as yet, as rivers are a little doubtful in this dry weather. We hope it will be one of the north coast rivers. Read the February magazine and find out!
 +
 +=====Science, Naturally!=====
 +
 +====The Pebble Game.====
 +
 +If ever you are really stuck for something to do, talk someone into playing the pebble game with you. Two players stand facing each other and place on the ground between them an odd number of pebbles (say 17). Now, in turn, they are each allowed to pick up one, two or three pebbles as he or she chooses.
 +
 +The players continue this nerve-wracking process until all the pebbles have been picked up.
 +
 +The winner  is the one who finishes up with an odd number of pebbles. This is really a sort of poor man's do-it-yourself Outward Bound course. Apart from stimulating mental exercise you get plenty of physical activity picking up pebbles (particularly if you use large pebbles), you learn to make split-second decisions, you learn self-control (do the lolly and throw one of your rocks at your opponent and you could easily wind up with an even number), and above all you'll learn self-reliance (carry a spare pebble in your pocket and you can' lose).
 +
 +====Menura novae-hollandiae.====
 +
 +Historians, strangely, neglect some important events, being perhaps too deeply interested in human beings to consider the claims of wild nature. Read almost any history of Australia, and you are unlikely to find more than a passing reference - if it be mentioned at all - to the lyre-bird.
 +
 +Among discoveries in the early days of settlement at Port Jackson, none is more notable than that made by an exploring party in January, 1798. Convicts were members of the minor expedition which collected the first known specimen of Menura novae-hollondiae, the superb lyre-bird. Generally at the infant settlement, the strange new bird was regarded as a pheasant; the more learned colanists, however, believed it to be a Bird-of-Paradise. Naturalists were almost as puzzled by Menura as they were by the Platypus, when specimens reached England.
196301.1450068700.txt.gz · Last modified: 2015/12/14 15:51 by tyreless