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199106 [2016/04/08 16:12]
tyreless
199106 [2016/04/09 12:39]
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 Vegetables, such as green beans, broccoli, green peas or brussel sprouts can be mixed with lentils and cooked. Vegetables, such as green beans, broccoli, green peas or brussel sprouts can be mixed with lentils and cooked.
  
 +=====Walking The Line.=====
  
- 
-WALKING THE LINE 
 by Jim Brown by Jim Brown
-Some forty to fifty years ago one of the tests used by Police to determine whether a person they had detained was "under the influrence" (oh, yes, alcohol, of course) was a requirement that he walk along a straight line drown on the floor of the Police Station. + 
-I suppose you could say it was a sort of "test walk", although hardly of the nature that bush walkers associate with that term.+Some forty to fifty years ago one of the tests used by Police to determine whether a person they had detained was "under the influrence" (oh, yes, alcohol, of course) was a requirement that he walk along a straight line drown on the floor of the Police Station. I suppose you could say it was a sort of "test walk", although hardly of the nature that bush walkers associate with that term. 
 There were many occasions when I "walked the line" - but not the one on the Police Station floor. My "line" was a railway line and I was there either because it was a convenient way to get back to a station (NO, NOT a Police Station), or because I had railroading photography in mind. There were many occasions when I "walked the line" - but not the one on the Police Station floor. My "line" was a railway line and I was there either because it was a convenient way to get back to a station (NO, NOT a Police Station), or because I had railroading photography in mind.
-No.., railway lines aren't straight, of course, but their curvature is quite gentle compared with the weaving course of the arrested toss-pots. In fact at that time the tightest + 
-curves on the State Rail network were of 4-or 5- chains radius - can you imagine an arc taken out of the circumference of a circle with a diameter of 200 metres and a circumference of about 630 metres? These were the tightest bends, and found only on a few hilly stretches, like the Richmond-Kurrajong extension, or the Tarana-Oberon Branch, both of which went out of +No, railway lines aren't straight, of course, but their curvature is quite gentle compared with the weaving course of the arrested toss-pots. In fact at that time the tightest curves on the State Rail network were of 4- or 5-chains radius - can you imagine an arc taken out of the circumference of a circle with a diameter of 200 metres and a circumference of about 630 metres? These were the tightest bends, and found only on a few hilly stretches, like the Richmond-Kurrajong extension, or the Tarana-Oberon Branch, both of which went out of operation years ago. On the Main lines the curves were much more gradual, the most severe that comes to mind being a bend on the Illawarra Line, south of Helensburgh, with a radius of 9 -chains - say a segment out of a circle 360 metres in diameter. 
-operation years ago. On the Main lines the curves were much more gradual, the most severe + 
-that comes to mind being a bend on the Illawarr-a Line, south of Helensburgh, with a radius of 9 -chains-- say a segment out of a circle 360 metres in diameter. +Naturally, the permitted speed of trains negotiating such curves was severely restricted, being about 25 m.p.h. (40 km/h) on a 9-chain curve, increasing to 36 or 40 m.p.h. on the 12- and 14-chain curves that were common on all mountainous sections of line. The reason is pretty obvious - in addition to the delay and disruption to timetables caused by derailments resulting from excessive speed around curves, there was the messy business of re-railing vehicles and repairing damage to both track and rolling stock. In addition Rail officials were required to investigate and report on derailments, and this could be a tedious and time-consuming task. I was once told by a "reliable source" that in the days when we still had trams in Sydney streets, wily old Traffic Inspectors always carried a broken bit of fishplate in their trucks, and from time to time would hit it with an axe to produce a "bright" dent: if no other reason for a derailment could be detected, the bit of steel plate could be produced as evidence that the wheel-flange of a tram had hit the "obstruction" on the line. 
-Naturally, the permitted speed of trains negotiating such curves was severely restricted, being about m.p.h. (40 km/h) on a 9-chain curve, increasing to 36 or 40 m.p.h. on the 12- and14-chain curves that were.common on all mountainous sections of line. The reason is + 
-pretty-obvious - in addition to the delay and disruption to timetables caused by derailments resulting from.excessive speed around curves, there was the messy business of re-:railing +The lack of curvature on the line trodden by the drunkards may have dismayed them, but I never had any problems with bends in the railway. Other factors, such as embankments, and particularly cuttings or tunnels, could be awkward, however, and over the years I evolved systems designed to minimise the hazards and induce greater peace of mind. In case you should ever find it expedient or necessary to "walk the line", these are my rules:- 
-vehicles and repairing damage to both track and rolling stock. In addition Rail officials + 
-were required to investigate and report on derailments, and this could be a tedious and time- +Rule 1 - On lines with two tracks, walk on the right-hand track. This is the same principle as walking on a road when there's no footpath - you face the oncoming traffic. If you have to walk a single-line railway, well, the best of British good luck to you. 
-consuming task. I was once told by a-"reliable source" that in the days when we still had + 
-trams in Sydney streets, wily old Traffic Inspectors always carried a broken bit of fishplate in their trucks, and from time to time would hit it with an axe to produce a."bright" dent: if no other reason for a derailment could be detected, the bit of steel plate could be produced as evidence that the wheel-flange of a tram had hit the "obstruction" on the line. +Rule 2 - If you need to pass through cuttings, try to ensure the party is well spread out in groups of no more than two or three people. There isn't much room between the cutting wall and the train if your party does have to scuttle off the line into the gutters, and packs can take up a bit of that space. Remember, too, that the rails may be 4 ft 8 1/2 inch (about 143 cm) apart, but the width of rolling stock may be up to almost 10 ft (say 260 cm) at the floor level of the vehicles - an overhang of 75 cm each side of the rails. 
-The lack of curvature on the line trodden by the drunkards may have dismayed them, but I never had any problems with bends in the railway. Other factors, such as embankments, and particularly cuttings or tunnels, could be awkward, however, and over the years I evolved systems designed to minimise the hazards and induce greater peace of mind. In case you should + 
-ever find it expedient or necessary to "walk the line", these are my rules:- +Rule 3 - Walk quietly, discourage noisy chatter and keep on listening for approaching trains. If you do hear one - GET RIGHT OFF __BOTH__ TRACKS. The rationale for this is that the noise of an "Up" train may mask the sound of another on the "Down" line. (In Rail parlance, "up" is travelling towards the capital city, and "down" going away from the city, but knowing that won't help you if you don't see or hear the approaching train.) Keep in mind that a train running at 80 km/h may take several hundred metres to stop, even if the driver does see you and makes a "full emergency brake application"
-Rule 1 - On lines with two tracks, walk on the right-hand track. This is the same principle + 
-as walking on a road when there's no footpath - you face the oncoming traffic. If you +I should like to be able to say that, having formulated these basic rules and having imparted them to any in my company, I have had a tranquil career when "walking the line". Poppycock! one experience will suffice. 
-have to walk a single-line railway, well, the best of British good luck to you. + 
-Rule 2 - If you need to pass through cuttings, try to ensure the party is well spread out in groups of no more than two or three people. There isn't much room between the cutting wall and the train if your party does have to scuttle off the line into the gutters, and packs can take up a bit of that space. Remember, too, that the rails may be +On a day, walk I led in the Brisbane Water National Park, we came out on the "down" track of the busy Northern Line just outside the southern portal of the long (1.75 km) Woy Woy tunnel, with about 2 km to walk along the line to Wondabyne, almost half of it through cuttings. There were 38 people in my party, so I clambered down the ladder on to the line, paused, signalled for silence and listened. All clear, so I summoned the party to follow. (Actually I could see right through the tunnel and there was nothing in it.) As each group came down the ladder I counselled them; over and over again, in the bare bones of my "rules", then sent them off in extended formation and watched the tail come down. 
-4 ft Fq inch (about 143 cm) apart, but the width of rolling stock may be up to almost 10 ft (say 260 cm) at the floor level of the vehicles - an overhang of 75 cm each side of the rails. + 
-Rule 3 - Walk quietly, discourage noisy chatter and keep on listening for approaching trains. If you do hear one - GET RIGHT OFF BOTH TRACKS. The rationale for this is that the +One of the last down slipped on a damp sandstone ledge, fell a couple of metres and ended sprawled on the track. We picked him up, dusted him down, found he was only slightly bruised and shaken, and then followed the main party. As my little group of three emerged from the first cutting we could see the party ahead - half of them walking on the "up" line (probably because the "down" line had recently been re-ballasted, and the new blue-metal was sharp and uncomfortable underfoot). All the party had coalesced into groups of seven or eight, and they were talking volubly. There was no possibility of overtaking them to restore "order", so we followed on the alert for south-bound "up" trains, and ready to yell loudly. 
-noise of an "Up" train may mask-the sound of another on the "Down" line. (In Rail + 
-parlance, "up" is travelling towards the capital city, and "down" going away from the city, but knowing that won't help you if you don't see or hear the approaching train.) Keep in mind that a train running at 80 km/h may take several hundred metres to stop+Happily no trains passed and 38 bodies, complete with 76 arms and 76 legs reached and overcrowded the tiny Wondabyne platform. Next day, looking at the extra grey hairs in my skull as I shaved, I murmured, like the legendary Raven - "Nevermore  except when I'm on my own". 
-, even if the driver does see you and makes a "full emergency brake application"+ 
-Page 6 The Sydney BuShwalker June 1991 +Well, all right, I've had a couple of scares even on my own, the one I remember best being in the Carlos Gap Tunnel on the single-track Mudgee Line, north of the town of Capertee. I'd gone there to photograph some of the final days of steam-train operation on the switch-back bit of line near Brogans Creek, where it skirts below huge sandstone cliffs, while out across Capertee Valley the eastern skyline includes Tyan Pic, Coricudgy and the other basalt tops: I was part-way through Carlos Gap tunnel when I heard the splutter of a motorised fettlers' trolley outside the north end, and dived into one of the refuges which are provided at intervals of about 50 metres in tunnel walls. I believe the three men on the trike never even suspected my presence. 
-I should like to be able to say that, having formulated these basic rules and having impartedthem to any in my company, I have had a tranquil career when "walking the line". Poppycock!one experience will suffice. +
-On a day, walk I led in the Brisbane Water National Park, we came out on the "down" track +
-of the busy Northern Line just outside the southern portal of the long (1.75 km) Woy Way tunnel, with about 2 km to walk along the line to Wondabyne, almost half of it through cuttings. There were 38 people in my party, so I clambered down the ladder on to the line, paused, signalled for silence and listened. All clear, so I summoned the party to follow. (Actually +
-I could :See right through the tunnel and there was nothing in it.) As each group came down the ladder I counselled them; over and over again, in the bare bones of my "rules", then Sent them off in extended formation and watched the tail come down. +
-One of the last down slipped on a damp sandstone ledge, fell a couple of metres and ended sprawled on the track. We picked him up, dusted him down, found he was only slightly bruised and shaken, and then followed the main party. As my little group of three emerged from the first cutting we could see the party ahead - half of them walking on the "up" line (probably because the "down" line had recently been re-ballasted, and the new blue-metal was sharp and uncomfortable underfoot). All the party had coalesced into groups of seven or eight, and they +
-were talking volubly. There was no possibility of overtaking them to restore "order", so we followed on the alert for south-bound "up" trains, and ready to yell loudly. +
--Happily no trains passed and 38 bodies, complete with 76 arms and 76 legs reached and overcrowded the tiny Wondabyne platform. Next day, looking at the extra grey hairs in my skull as I shaved, I murmured, like the legendary Raven - "Nevermore  except when I'm on my own"+
-Well, all right, I've had a couple of scares even on my own, the one I remember best being in-the'Carlos Gap Tunnel on the single-track Mudgee Line, north of the town of Capertee. I'd +
-gone there to photograph some of the final days of steam-train operation on the switch-back bit-of line near Brogans Creek, where it skirts below huge sandstone cliffs, while out across Cap'ertee Valley the eastern skyline includes Tyan Pic, Coricudgy and the other basalt tops: I wath part-way through Carlos Gap tunnel when I heard the splutter of a motorised fettlers1 trolley outsidethe north end, and dived into one of the refuges which are provided at intervals +
-of about SO metres in tunnel walls. I believe the three men on the trike never even suspectedmy presence.+
 There's not much else I can tell you about "walking the line". Except "It's illegal." "It's potentially deadly." - and "Be careful." There's not much else I can tell you about "walking the line". Except "It's illegal." "It's potentially deadly." - and "Be careful."
-LIMERICK  + 
-In Reply to Errol Sheedy)+=====Limerick.===== 
 + 
 +(In Reply to Errol Sheedy) 
 by Jim Brown by Jim Brown
-This-Sheedy bloke's got to be nuts! 
-I can say this without "ifs" or "buts": For my toes are not bent 
-Where in sandshoes I went, 
-Though I could use a new set of guts  
-(Oh, and if anyone has a cheap set of re-treaded lungs, 
-they could perhaps be-useful.) 
-GOOD WALKING, ERROL MATE - 
-June 1991 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 7 
  
-VALE PAUL SHARP+This Sheedy bloke's got to be nuts!\\ 
 +I can say this without "ifs" or "buts":\\ 
 +For my toes are __not__ bent\\ 
 +Where in sandshoes I went,\\ 
 +Though I could use a new set of guts...
  
-by Ailsa Bodking+(Oh, and if anyone has a cheap set of re-treaded lungs, they could perhaps be useful.)
  
-Long standing members of the Club will be saddened to hear of the death of Paul Sharp. Paul died on April 9th, 1991, at the age of 61, after a courageous battle against a long illness. Paul was a committed conservationist with a strong sense of social justice, and was politically active in the fledgling environmental movements of the 1960aBe was Deputy National Leader of the Australia Party for a period, a member of ZPG, and the prestigious Club of Rome. So strongly held were his conservationist ideals, that he resigned his job as managing director of a large pdblic company when the Board asked him to cease his conservation activities. Be was a man of extraordinary intellect, and great gentlemess of manner. +Good walking, Errol mate - 
-Paul had a deep love of the bush and of wilderness. He was moat active in saw during the 1960s and early 708, doing many exploratorywalks in the Budawangs, the Colo wilderness and the or Mouritains.Paul continued to be an active walker throught the 1970s and up to the mid 1980s. His favourite places were always the wilder areas of the Budawangs and the Snowy Mountains. He was happiest -when he was sitting boiling a billy over a fire in a camping cave in the Budawangs, at the end of a good day's walk. When active weekend walking was DO logner possible, Paul took up day walking and birdwatching as a way'of keeping in touch with the 'bush ardbis beloved wilderness. Biniwatching trips took him as far afield as the Kimberleys and Mitchell Plateau, Alice Springs to Perth via the Great Victorialbsert, Cape York, Kangaroo Island, KakadaKindhega, the Flinders Ranges, to name a few. + 
-was deeply loved and respected by his many friends. He willbe sadly missed.+=====Vale Paul Sharp.===== 
 + 
 +by Ailsa Hocking 
 + 
 +Long standing members of the Club will be saddened to hear of the death of Paul Sharp. Paul died on April 9th, 1991, at the age of 61, after a courageous battle against a long illness. Paul was a committed conservationist with a strong sense of social justice, and was politically active in the fledgling environmental movements of the 1960sHe was Deputy National Leader of the Australia Party for a period, a member of ZPG, and the prestigious Club of Rome. So strongly held were his conservationist ideals, that he resigned his job as managing director of a large pdblic company when the Board asked him to cease his conservation activities. He was a man of extraordinary intellect, and great gentleness of manner. 
 + 
 +Paul had a deep love of the bush and of wilderness. He was most active in SBW during the 1960s and early 70s, doing many exploratory walks in the Budawangs, the Colo wilderness and the Snowy Mountains. Paul continued to be an active walker throught the 1970s and up to the mid 1980s. His favourite places were always the wilder areas of the Budawangs and the Snowy Mountains. He was happiest when he was sitting boiling a billy over a fire in a camping cave in the Budawangs, at the end of a good day's walk. When active weekend walking was no logner possible, Paul took up day walking and birdwatching as a way of keeping in touch with the bush and his beloved wilderness. Birdwatching trips took him as far afield as the Kimberleys and Mitchell Plateau, Alice Springs to Perth via the Great Victoria Desert, Cape York, Kangaroo Island, KakaduKinchega, the Flinders Ranges, to name a few. 
 + 
 +Paul was deeply loved and respected by his many friends. He will be sadly missed
 + 
 +=====Obituary - A Tribute To Deny King.===== 
 + 
 +We are all greatly saddened by the death on Sunday 12 May of the Club's Honorary Associate member, Deny (Charles Denison) King, of "Melaleuca", Port Davey. 
 + 
 +Deny's first introduction to Port Davey was in 1930 when he and his father, Charles G. King, made two trips to Mount Mackenzie to investigate gold deposits there. Deny began tin mining operations in 1945 after war service in New Guinea, and started building his home, "Melaleuca", on a bank of Moth Creek. 
 + 
 +Deny was very strong and resourceful. He constructed the air-strip and two huts for walkers. From early 1946 he compiled daily weather reports. An outpost radio service was established in the early fifties, enabling daily weather reports and emergency contact. Deny married Margaret Cadell in 1949 and made the wedding ring from gold that he panned on his mining lease. She died in 1967. 
 + 
 +Many will remember Deny for his hospitality and help in ferrying them across Bathurst Channel or to the Old River, using the "Melaleuca" or "Blue Boat". He was a keen botanist and artist and befriended innumerable bushwalkers and other visitors. 
 + 
 +We extend Our condolences to his daughters, Janet and Mary. His cheery welcome will be sadly missed. A vital spark has gone out of the South-West.
  
-A TRIBUTE TO DENY KING 
-We ate all greatly saddened by the death on Sunday 12 May of the Club's Honorary Associate member, Deny (Charles Denison) King; of "Melaleuca", Part Davey. 
-Deny's first introduction to Port Davey was in 1930 when he and his father, Charles 
-G. King, made two trips to Mount Mackenzie to investigate gold deposits there. Deny began 
-tin mining operations in 1945 after war service in New Guinea, and started building his home, "Melaleuca", on a bank of Moth Creek. 
-Deny was very strong and resourceful. He constructed the air-strip and two huts for 
-walkers. 'From early 1946 he compiled daily weather reports. An outpost radio service was 
-established'in the early fifties, enabling daily weather reports and emergency contact. Deny married Margaret Cadell in 1949 and made the wedding ring from gold that he panned on 
-his mining lease. She died in 1967. 
-Many will remember Deny for his hospitality and help in ferrying them across Bathurst. Channel or to the Old River, using the "Melaleuca" or "Blue Boat". HP was a keen botanist 
-and artist and befriended innumerable bushwalkers and other visitors. 
-We extend Our condolences to his daughters, Janet and Mary. His cheery welcome will be 
-sadly missed. A vital spark has gone out of the South-West. 
 Jessie Luckman & Arthur Knight Jessie Luckman & Arthur Knight
-HOBART WALKING CLUB INC. 
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-Durable comfort for the hardest walks. 4 
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-June 1991 The Sydney Bushwalker Page 9 
  
-AND IT RAINED FOR FORTYDAYS FORTY NIGHTS.... +Hobart Walking Club Inc. 
-24,25,26,27.1.28th 4rili  1985+ 
 +=====And It Rained For Forty Days Forty Nights....===== 
 + 
 +====24,25,26,27,28th April 1985==== 
 by Hans Stichter (First published July 1985) by Hans Stichter (First published July 1985)
-Members of the Party: Barbara Bruce, Bill Holland, Ray Hookway,Peter Miller (Leader), 
-Fran Longfoot, Jim Percy, Adrienne Schilling, Hans Stichter, Jo Van Sommers, Barry Wallace' 
-Wednesday, 24.4.85 
-9.00 am: I had just made a phone call to the Water Board a, Guildford, to find out the level of the Kowmung River when the reply caMe, "Why would you want to go down there?" Lignored that question as he further replied, "0.5 m above normal river level as at 8.00 am 23.4.85, at Cedar Ford crossing.!' 
-Despite steady rain since Monday morning I thought that the weather must surely break soon, and that it coUldn't possibly continue to rain for the whole Of the extended Anzac weekend trip. A further call to Peter miller to confirm transport arrangements for that night also 
-revealed that Peter was about to pull out additional maps, just in case the trip had to be re-routed-due to inclement, weather conditions. 
-Bill, Peter and Fran arrived approximately 7.00 pm to pick me up and take me into the grey wet yonder. A stopover at.Aroneys with the usual ordering of snacks revealed that Peter 
-had already pondered on alternative walks that could be done from Kanangra, subject to river level/wet conditions and the general feeling of the party. 
-we arrived at Boyd Crossing approximately 11.00 pm with Barry and his passengers arriving immediately behind. Our car load decided to erect tents without any undue delay, whilst Barry and his passengers headed for the warmth and dryness of the Dance Floor cave at Kanangra. - 
-The sound of heavy rain on the walls of my japara tent soon sent me to sleep, only to awoken 
-to the bright lights and sound of another vehicle arriving approximately an hour later. This 
-was to herald the arrival of Jim and his passengers. 
  
-As conditions were not favourable on awakening, we all headed for the Kanangra car park with the intention of having breakfast in the cave with Barry, Ray and Adrienne. However, on +===Members of the Party:=== 
-starting off, we were soon contronted by three "not so amused" persons heading in our direction. It appears that on arriving late at Kanangra the previous night, there was some difficulty in + 
-locating the exact route down to the Dance Floor cave. This was not due to the incompetence +Barbara Bruce, Bill Holland, Ray Hookway,Peter Miller (Leader), Fran Longfoot, Jim Percy, Adrienne Schilling, Hans Stichter, Jo Van Sommers, Barry Wallace. 
-of the three in question, but due to "restoration?" work being carried out by the NP&WS. By + 
-the time the new 22.thway had been located, they had already spent some considerable time in heavy rain and muddy conditions.+===Wednesday, 24.4.85=== 
 + 
 +__9.00 am__: I had just made a phone call to the Water Board at Headworks, Guildford, to find out the level of the Kowmung River when the reply came, "Why would you want to go down there?" I ignored that question as he further replied, "0.5 m above normal river level as at 8.00 am 23.4.85, at Cedar Ford crossing." 
 + 
 +Despite steady rain since Monday morning I thought that the weather must surely break soon, and that it couldn't possibly continue to rain for the whole Of the extended Anzac weekend trip. A further call to Peter Miller to confirm transport arrangements for that night also revealed that Peter was about to pull out additional maps, just in case the trip had to be re-routed due to inclement weather conditions. 
 + 
 +Bill, Peter and Fran arrived approximately 7.00 pm to pick me up and take me into the grey wet yonder. A stopover at Aroneys with the usual ordering of snacks revealed that Peter had already pondered on alternative walks that could be done from Kanangra, subject to river level/wet conditions and the general feeling of the party. 
 + 
 +We arrived at Boyd Crossing approximately 11.00 pm with Barry and his passengers arriving immediately behind. Our car load decided to erect tents without any undue delay, whilst Barry and his passengers headed for the warmth and dryness of the Dance Floor cave at Kanangra. The sound of heavy rain on the walls of my japara tent soon sent me to sleep, only to awaken to the bright lights and sound of another vehicle arriving approximately an hour later. This was to herald the arrival of Jim and his passengers. 
 + 
 +===Thursday, 25/4/85=== 
 + 
 +As conditions were not favourable on awakening, we all headed for the Kanangra car park with the intention of having breakfast in the cave with Barry, Ray and Adrienne. However, on starting off, we were soon contronted by three "not so amused" persons heading in our direction. It appears that on arriving late at Kanangra the previous night, there was some difficulty in locating the exact route down to the Dance Floor cave. This was not due to the incompetence of the three in question, but due to "restoration?" work being carried out by the NP&WS. By the time the new __pathway__ had been located, they had already spent some considerable time in heavy rain and muddy conditions. 
 A quick breakfast at the cars soon saw the party of ten moving off for the Coal Seam Cave, where we were to meet three other walkers huddled around a warm glowing fire. Our party soon settled in for a long stay with the conversation centring around predicting the weather. To me it was obvious - we should take it "one cave at a time". A quick breakfast at the cars soon saw the party of ten moving off for the Coal Seam Cave, where we were to meet three other walkers huddled around a warm glowing fire. Our party soon settled in for a long stay with the conversation centring around predicting the weather. To me it was obvious - we should take it "one cave at a time".
-It was to be an extended stop and we moved off soonafter having had lunch at the cave. The mist just began to lift in the valleys in front of us as we headed down Gingra Ridge for the turn-off point to Cambage Spire. We would camp that evening on the Kowmung River just upstream from its junction with Christie's Creek. The weather conditions would determine 
-what the party would be doing on the next day. 
-Friday, 26.4.85 
-Persistent and heavy rain during the night caused Christie's Creek to come up a little, whilst the Kowmung still remained no problem in regards to crossing it. However, it was 
-doubtful that the weather would break for some time if at all today. With the extended trip 
-not yet halfway through, the group decided that they would stay put until the following morning. Today's activities would consist of drinking bottomless cups of various teas, discussions on an endless number of topics, and for those energetic enough, a short walk up the Kowmung to Church Creek, in the afternoon. 
  
-It was just before lunch that we met the first of two parties of walkers, both consisting of two male members in each party. The first party, both members approximately 25-30 years of +It was to be an extended stop and we moved off soon after having had lunch at the cave. The mist just began to lift in the valleys in front of us as we headed down Gingra Ridge for the turn-off point to Cambage Spire. We would camp that evening on the Kowmung River just upstream from its junction with Christie's Creek. The weather conditions would determine what the party would be doing on the next day. 
-age, were completely saturated to the skin, in what can only be described as unsuitable bush walking clothes and equipment, i.e. denim jeans, long ex-army trousers, waist length nylon + 
-parkas and cotton IT' shirts. All of this was saturated with water, with only a flimsy plastic undersized cape to protect them from the heavy downpours that they had been experiencing since leaving Boyd River crossing on Thursday morning. +===Friday, 26.4.85=== 
-When questioned about their route plan, their reply was "Katoomba via Kowmung River, Cox's River, Narrowneck, by SUNDAY LUNCH TIME". Any experienced walker would realise that this would be a demanding trip under normal walking conditions, and yet these two persons had no idea of how long it would take to walk the Kowmung, where their present location was on the Kowmung, and the fact that they were facing a compulsory swim further downstream from our campsite if they were to keep following the river. They took Peter and Barry's advice that they would be better off Heading up to the Scott's Main Range Road and than following it to its end and + 
-dropping off at Mount Cookem,thus enabling them to make better time. Perhaps they would have +Persistent and heavy rain during the night caused Christie's Creek to come up a little, whilst the Kowmung still remained no problem in regards to crossing it. However, it was doubtful that the weather would break for some time if at all today. With the extended trip not yet halfway through, the group decided that they would stay put until the following morning. Today's activities would consist of drinking bottomless cups of various teas, discussions on an endless number of topics, and for those energetic enough, a short walk up the Kowmung to Church Creek, in the afternoon. 
-been wiser to return to Kanangra, as was also suggested to them. + 
-The second party we met in the afternoon, as Barry, Ray and I were enjoying a cup of coffee around the campfire. How experience shows through with walkers, even from a great distance! These two fellows were obviously not new to walking. After the introductory hand- +It was just before lunch that we met the first of two parties of walkers, both consisting of two male members in each party. The first party, both members approximately 25-30 years of age, were completely saturated to the skin, in what can only be described as unsuitable bush walking clothes and equipment, i.e. denim jeans, long ex-army trousers, waist length nylon parkas and cotton 'T' shirts. All of this was saturated with water, with only a flimsy plastic undersized cape to protect them from the heavy downpours that they had been experiencing since leaving Boyd River crossing on Thursday morning. 
-shake and offering of coffee and use of the fire, we discussed where they had been and where + 
-they were heading. They also took the opportunity to have afternoon tea, consisting of salami +When questioned about their route plan, their reply was "Katoomba via Kowmung River, Cox's River, Narrowneck, by Sunday lunch time". Any experienced walker would realise that this would be a demanding trip under normal walking conditions, and yet these two persons had no idea of how long it would take to walk the Kowmung, where their present location was __on__ the Kowmung, and the fact that they were facing a compulsory swim further downstream from our campsite if they were to keep following the river. They took Peter and Barry's advice that they would be better off Heading up to the Scott's Main Range Road and than following it to its end and dropping off at Mount Cookem, thus enabling them to make better time. Perhaps they would have been wiser to return to Kanangra, as was also suggested to them. 
-and biscuits, and it wasn't long before they were soon.off walking up the ridge to Cambage Spire. + 
-At this stage our energetic party of seven arrived back at the campfire. Withintermittent showers most of the day, we had kept the fire burning continuously as it would have been an unenviable task to relight the fire when we would have needed it for dinner. Discussion around the fire that night revealed concensus that if the elusive sunny weather we had been waiting for did not appear, it would be best if we headed back to Kanangra Walls, and put the trip down to experience. +The second party we met in the afternoon, as Barry, Ray and I were enjoying a cup of coffee around the campfire. How experience shows through with walkers, even from a great distance! These two fellows were obviously not new to walking. After the introductory handshake and offering of coffee and use of the fire, we discussed where they had been and where they were heading. They also took the opportunity to have afternoon tea, consisting of salami and biscuits, and it wasn't long before they were soon off walking up the ridge to Cambage Spire. 
-It is interessting to note that with persistent rain, thelonger it continues to rain, the deeper the water penetrates into one's gear and equipment, no matter how hard one tries to prevent this. We had been unlucky, for up to now we had not had any sunshine to "dry out" since starting off on Wednesday night.  + 
-Saturday, 27.4.84. +At this stage our energetic party of seven arrived back at the campfire. With intermittent showers most of the day, we had kept the fire burning continuously as it would have been an unenviable task to relight the fire when we would have needed it for dinner. Discussion around the fire that night revealed concensus that if the elusive sunny weather we had been waiting for did not appear, it would be best if we headed back to Kanangra Walls, and put the trip down to experience. 
-"And it rained for40 days and 40 nights".... as the story goes. Last night and partic- + 
-ularly this morning was to be no exception. +It is interessting to note that with persistent rain, the longer it continues to rain, the deeper the water penetrates into one's gear and equipment, no matter how hard one tries to prevent this. We had been unlucky, for up to now we had not had any sunshine to "dry out" since starting off on Wednesday night. 
-"Forget the fire - let's have a cold breakfast and be off by 8.00 am," was the order. Three and half hours later saw us at the Coal Seam Cave,,, consuming bacon and eggs, toast and honey and other such items that we had missed out on at breakfast time. + 
-Once again we 'met someother walkers who were ready to tackle the elements and the mountains. We were pleased it was them and not us. A quick dash to the cars with a change of clothing saw us heading off to Katoomba for that cup of hot chocolate at Aroney's.+===Saturday, 27.4.84=== 
 + 
 +"And it rained for 40 days and 40 nights".... as the story goes. Last night and particularly this morning was to be no exception. 
 + 
 +"Forget the fire - let's have a cold breakfast and be off by 8.00 am," was the order. Three and half hours later saw us at the Coal Seam Cave, consuming bacon and eggs, toast and honey and other such items that we had missed out on at breakfast time. 
 + 
 +Once again we met some other walkers who were ready to tackle the elements and the mountains. We were pleased it was them and not us. A quick dash to the cars with a change of clothing saw us heading off to Katoomba for that cup of hot chocolate at Aroney's. 
 Despite unpleasant walking conditons the members of the party had had many humorous moments shared around the campfires. There was little walking done over the three days, but once again the party proved that it is not so much where you walk, but who you walk with that makes the trip. Despite unpleasant walking conditons the members of the party had had many humorous moments shared around the campfires. There was little walking done over the three days, but once again the party proved that it is not so much where you walk, but who you walk with that makes the trip.
-STOP PRESS+ 
-The stormy weather and heavy rain of the June Holiday Weekend caused problems for the SBW parties. We hope to publish details in a later.- +---- 
-magazine. ED. + 
-QL19 ` QBB +====Stop Press!==== 
-Butter Concentrate + 
-NT +The stormy weather and heavy rain of the June Holiday Weekend caused problems for the SBW parties. We hope to publish details in a later magazine. ED. 
- Beef Jer + 
-ACT +---- 
- National Maps +
-Vie +
- Outgear Backpacks Accessories +
- Feathertop ' Wool Shirts +
- Giant Trees Dried meals +
-NSW +
- Sleeping Bags J & H, Mont, Romans +
- Rainwear Mont, J & H, Superior +
- Day Packs High Tops, Summit Gear +
- Bonwick Caving Ladders f +
- Holeproof /4 Undies Socks +
- Trailblaz6r Hats DBStuff Canyon bags +
-TAS. +
- Blundstone Boots +
-WA +
- Wilderness Equipment +
- Backpacks +
-Goretex Clothing Cycle Panniers +
- SA +
- Rossits +
- Flnders Baby Carriers +
-EASTWOOD +
-CAMPING +
-CENTRE +
-3 Trelawney St (PO Box 131) Eastwood NSW 2122 +
-+
-Page 12 The Sydney Bushwalker June 1991+
  
  
199106.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/20 12:30 by tyreless