User Tools

Site Tools


199711

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
199711 [2016/04/21 23:09]
kennettj [Walking Wedding in the Swiss Alps]
199711 [2016/04/22 04:09] (current)
kennettj [ADDRESS & PHONE CHANGES:]
Line 10: Line 10:
 |President| Tony Holgate| |President| Tony Holgate|
 |Vice-President| Morie Ward| |Vice-President| Morie Ward|
-|Public OfficerFran Holland|+|Public OfficerFran Holland|
 |Treasurer| Greta James| |Treasurer| Greta James|
 |Secretary| Michele Powell| |Secretary| Michele Powell|
Line 40: Line 40:
 |P 14 |Forty Degrees South by Frank Davis| |P 14 |Forty Degrees South by Frank Davis|
 |P 15 |Problems in Kakadu| |P 15 |Problems in Kakadu|
-|P 16 Lightweight Stove by Don Brooks|+|P 16 Lightweight Stove by Don Brooks|
 | | Little Wobby & Beyond by Don Brooks|  | | Little Wobby & Beyond by Don Brooks| 
 | |Walking Wedding in the Swiss Alps by Carol Lubbers| | |Walking Wedding in the Swiss Alps by Carol Lubbers|
Line 118: Line 118:
 We have been very active in seeking members' assistance in writing letters on two crucial conservation issues: We have been very active in seeking members' assistance in writing letters on two crucial conservation issues:
  
-1 Wollemi National Park Draft Plan of Management, and+1 Wollemi National Park Draft Plan of Management, and\\
 2 NP&WS Draft Public Access Strategy 2 NP&WS Draft Public Access Strategy
  
Line 178: Line 178:
 Ian joined the Club in 1977 and has been an active walker and walks leader for 20 years. In 1986 Ian was elected Delegate to the Federation of Bushwalking Clubs. In 1987 Ian was chairman of 60th Anniversary Committee. Then in 1988 he was Social Secretary. He took over the top job as President in 1992-1994. In between this Ian was archivist from 1990 - 1997. Ian joined the Club in 1977 and has been an active walker and walks leader for 20 years. In 1986 Ian was elected Delegate to the Federation of Bushwalking Clubs. In 1987 Ian was chairman of 60th Anniversary Committee. Then in 1988 he was Social Secretary. He took over the top job as President in 1992-1994. In between this Ian was archivist from 1990 - 1997.
  
-Besides these stints in the limelight, Ian is the type of person who works away in the background, doing what is necessary and required. Bringing lights and tables and barbeque gear to where it was needed, to the Clubroom or to a car camp walk or lugging it up a creek. For many years he was in charge of Coolana maintenance: manager, supervisor, foreman and worker all in one.+Besides these stints in the limelight, Ian is the type of person who works away in the background, doing what is necessary and required. Bringing lights and tables and barbecue gear to where it was needed, to the Clubroom or to a car camp walk or lugging it up a creek. For many years he was in charge of Coolana maintenance: manager, supervisor, foreman and worker all in one.
  
 ==== Frank Rigby ==== ==== Frank Rigby ====
Line 212: Line 212:
 (It has not escaped the Editor's attention, having tripped, stumbled and fallen in the same manner, that bushwalkers falling in love with, and subsequently marrying bushwalkers continues to be an occupational risk associated with bushwalking. The Honoraries above with honourable intentions include Shirley, Frank, Marjorie, Grace and John; and now Jennifer and Eddy. It must be something in the billy water, or a reaction to leeches.) (It has not escaped the Editor's attention, having tripped, stumbled and fallen in the same manner, that bushwalkers falling in love with, and subsequently marrying bushwalkers continues to be an occupational risk associated with bushwalking. The Honoraries above with honourable intentions include Shirley, Frank, Marjorie, Grace and John; and now Jennifer and Eddy. It must be something in the billy water, or a reaction to leeches.)
  
-===== ADDRESS PHONE CHANGES: =====+===== Address Phone Changes =====
    
  
Line 319: Line 319:
  
  
-Forty Degrees South: The the island's highest peakdominates in the south Enigma that is Flinders Island by and affords magnificent views from the top. +==== Forty Degrees South, Enigma that is Flinders Island  ==== 
-Frank Davis,+ 
 +Frank Davis
  
 Remnant of a land bridge that once joined Tasmania to Victoria, Flinders Island sits astride the Fortieth Parallel of Latitude. Lapped by sparkling, clear blue water, this enigmatic land is in many ways a place of contrasts. Remnant of a land bridge that once joined Tasmania to Victoria, Flinders Island sits astride the Fortieth Parallel of Latitude. Lapped by sparkling, clear blue water, this enigmatic land is in many ways a place of contrasts.
  
-The island: Fronting winds and seas that arrive unchecked from Africa, the west coast is predominantly a granite bulwark. Smallish beaches and an occasional outcrop of erosion sculptured limestone the only chinks in this armoured shore. The east coast is almost entirely beach, interrupted by a couple of inlets and backed by a half dozen shallow lagoons that, during dry periods., can become sandy deserts.+The island: Fronting winds and seas that arrive unchecked from Africa, the west coast is predominantly a granite bulwark. Smallish beaches and an occasional outcrop of erosion sculptured limestone the only chinks in this armoured shore. The east coast is almost entirely beach, interrupted by a couple of inlets and backed by a half dozen shallow lagoons that, during dry periods, can become sandy deserts. 
 Between the major granite outcrops of Mt. Killiecrankie in the north, the Patriarchs to the east and Mt. Leventhorpe in the Darling Range, lie flat sandy plains. Some ten thousand years ago these plains were seabed, this surface needs barely to be scratched to reveal sea shells from this by-gone age. It is largely these plains that were divided and cleared by soldier-settlers, who at that time comprised the bulk of the island's population. Between the major granite outcrops of Mt. Killiecrankie in the north, the Patriarchs to the east and Mt. Leventhorpe in the Darling Range, lie flat sandy plains. Some ten thousand years ago these plains were seabed, this surface needs barely to be scratched to reveal sea shells from this by-gone age. It is largely these plains that were divided and cleared by soldier-settlers, who at that time comprised the bulk of the island's population.
 +
 A 'dry spell' had proceeded our arrival, the pasture on these plains was desiccated and the one time sea bottom looked like it would require constant nourishing to maintain adequate stock grazing. A 'dry spell' had proceeded our arrival, the pasture on these plains was desiccated and the one time sea bottom looked like it would require constant nourishing to maintain adequate stock grazing.
 +
 Now numbering some 600, the population is less than half than at its peak. Many farms are up for sale (with no buyers). Few young people stay on after school age. There must be some concern over the future of the island, but then, a local identified Australia as 'the north island' and Tasmania as 'the south island'. "If that's the case what is Flinders?" you ask "The centre of the Universe" he quips. Now numbering some 600, the population is less than half than at its peak. Many farms are up for sale (with no buyers). Few young people stay on after school age. There must be some concern over the future of the island, but then, a local identified Australia as 'the north island' and Tasmania as 'the south island'. "If that's the case what is Flinders?" you ask "The centre of the Universe" he quips.
-Sitting atop Mt. Strzelecici you could believe this, besides, as the brochure says 'it's not why go to Flinders but why not go?' Mt. Strzelecki, + 
-I97 The Sydney . .The Walks: Our first walk was an easy 5k warm up on the west coast. Starting on the edge of an extensive tidal marsh flat on an arm of Parrys Bay, rock-hopping around the prominent Long Point, returning via the western facing beach.+Sitting atop Mt. Strzelecici you could believe this, besides, as the brochure says 'it's not why go to Flinders but why not go?' Mt. Strzelecki,he island's highest peak, dominates in the south and affords magnificent views from the top. 
 + 
 +The Walks: Our first walk was an easy 5k warm up on the west coast. Starting on the edge of an extensive tidal marsh flat on an arm of Parrys Bay, rock-hopping around the prominent Long Point, returning via the western facing beach. 
 On day 2 we tackled Mt. Strzelecki. An easy climb through small trees and scrub to begin - steeper and rougher as we progressed. A strong, chill wind in exposed areas saw us seek shelter at the top for lunch: Some cloud and haze made it less than ideal for photography but the panorama was spectacular. On day 2 we tackled Mt. Strzelecki. An easy climb through small trees and scrub to begin - steeper and rougher as we progressed. A strong, chill wind in exposed areas saw us seek shelter at the top for lunch: Some cloud and haze made it less than ideal for photography but the panorama was spectacular.
 +
 Day 3. While in mountain mode we headed for Mt. Killiecrankie. An hours beach walk took us to the beginning of the Quoin Cattle Co. property. With prior permission we followed extensive trails through tea-tree, small eucalypts and miniature banksias to reach the base of this granite crown. Day 3. While in mountain mode we headed for Mt. Killiecrankie. An hours beach walk took us to the beginning of the Quoin Cattle Co. property. With prior permission we followed extensive trails through tea-tree, small eucalypts and miniature banksias to reach the base of this granite crown.
-We scrambled almost to the top, then came a time when the wind was so heavy, (would have blown the spots off a Dalmatian), it would have been irresponsible folly to continue. Retreating, we lunched in the shelter. of scrub-bordered fire- trail, then returned along the beach to Killiecrankie settlement. 
-Next day saw the start of the 3-day walk along the N-W coastline. This was 451cm from the mouth of the North East River around to West End. A shortage of water necessitated caches to be left for the end of day 1 and day 2. This also meant that our packs could be left, so on days 1 and 3 we carried only day packs (a wonderful idea). 
-The route was a mixture of some serious rock- hopping on small and large granite boulders, a patch or two of some spiteful looking ragged limestone, small sandy coves and beaches, headlands of thick tussock grass and areas of fallen casuarinas. We used some tracks through low, wind pruned vegetation that would have 
  
-low, wind pruned vegetation that ri 7' you'have walks have lacked,the flow and cohesion of, say, been fine, had we been no taller than the a Hume & Hovell walk or a Kakadu Trek. wallabies who forged them. +We scrambled almost to the topthen came a time when the wind was so heavy, (would have blown the spots off a Dalmatian), it would have been irresponsible folly to continue. Retreatingwe lunched in the shelter of scrub-bordered fire- trail, then returned along the beach to Killiecrankie settlement. 
-Landmarks such as Sleepy Beach, She Oak PointThe Dock, Stackeys Bite, Twelve Hour Point and Egg Beach were reached and passed: there is possibly a book in just how these locations got their names. As well, in the south, there is Trousers Point, Pigs Head Point, Tongue Point and Badger Corner (the local name for wombats): sure wouldn't want these people naming any children of mine. + 
-Back to day walks; the east coast beaches were attacked, then a switch to the west to Walk from Emita to Castle Rock. In the south we visited Logan: Lagoon Wildlife Sanctuary, then walked nOrtli on the beach past Pot Boil Point. The return to the vehicle was via the edge of a bone dry Logans Lagoon.+Next day saw the start of the 3-day walk along the N-W coastline. This was 45km from the mouth of the North East River around to West End. A shortage of water necessitated caches to be left for the end of day 1 and day 2. This also meant that our packs could be left, so on days 1 and 3 we carried only day packs (a wonderful idea). 
 + 
 +The route was a mixture of some serious rock-hopping on small and large granite bouldersa patch or two of some spiteful looking ragged limestonesmall sandy coves and beaches, headlands of thick tussock grass and areas of fallen casuarinas. We used some tracks through low, wind pruned vegetation that would have been been fine, had we been no taller than the wallabies who forged them. 
 + 
 +Landmarks such as Sleepy Beach, She Oak PointThe Dock, Stackeys Bite, Twelve Hour Point and Egg Beach were reached and passed: there is possibly a book in just how these locations got their names. As well, in the south, there is Trousers Point, Pigs Head Point, Tongue Point and Badger Corner (the local name for wombats): sure wouldn't want these people naming any children of mine. 
 + 
 +Back to day walks; the east coast beaches were attacked, then a switch to the west to walk from Emita to Castle Rock. In the south we visited Logan: Lagoon Wildlife Sanctuary, then walked north on the beach past Pot Boil Point. The return to the vehicle was via the edge of a bone dry Logans Lagoon. 
 For a change of pace the next walk was through the Darling Range. This walk started with a gradual climb on a compacted loam/clay road, a surface not encountered before. We took a side track to see the 'White Gum' grove and to spot the rare Forty-spotted Pardalote. For a change of pace the next walk was through the Darling Range. This walk started with a gradual climb on a compacted loam/clay road, a surface not encountered before. We took a side track to see the 'White Gum' grove and to spot the rare Forty-spotted Pardalote.
 +
 The track then passed through larger trees; this area reminiscent of the Lower Blue Mountains with vegetation of eucalypts, tea-tree, hakeas and xanthorrhoea. We missed the side track to Mt. Leventhorpe but then, the wind strength would have made the climb uncomfortable if not dangerous. This 17 km walk through the low range was a stark contrast to the coastal walks. The track then passed through larger trees; this area reminiscent of the Lower Blue Mountains with vegetation of eucalypts, tea-tree, hakeas and xanthorrhoea. We missed the side track to Mt. Leventhorpe but then, the wind strength would have made the climb uncomfortable if not dangerous. This 17 km walk through the low range was a stark contrast to the coastal walks.
 +
 Our last day available and we at last visited Trousers Point: a mystery solved at last, so named because someone swam ashore from a ship sans trousers. Why not NO TROUSERS POINT? Our last day available and we at last visited Trousers Point: a mystery solved at last, so named because someone swam ashore from a ship sans trousers. Why not NO TROUSERS POINT?
-This programme of walks had been great, the diversity of terrain and scenery unforgettable. Don's planning, as usual, immaculate. The daily return to bed, hot water shower and micro-wave oven, however, has been a mixed blessing. The+ 
 +This programme of walks had been great, the diversity of terrain and scenery unforgettable. Don's planning, as usual, immaculate. The daily return to bed, hot water shower and micro-wave oven, however, has been a mixed blessing. The walks have lacked the flow and cohesion of say a Hume and Hovell walk or a Kakadu Trek. 
 The Place: Carnsdale, our host farm, is situated just north of the centre of the island and some 4k from the east coast beaches. The house has every facility to make a stay comfortable and enjoyable. Our hosts, Judy and Rob Wilson could not have been more pleasant or helpful. The Place: Carnsdale, our host farm, is situated just north of the centre of the island and some 4k from the east coast beaches. The house has every facility to make a stay comfortable and enjoyable. Our hosts, Judy and Rob Wilson could not have been more pleasant or helpful.
 +
 The location could be considered isolated without transport, but then our programme would have been impossible with no vehicle. We had a white, 8-seater van to begin with, which was later replaced by a red one. This one went much faster (red vehicles are always faster than other colours, aren't they). The location could be considered isolated without transport, but then our programme would have been impossible with no vehicle. We had a white, 8-seater van to begin with, which was later replaced by a red one. This one went much faster (red vehicles are always faster than other colours, aren't they).
 +
 Barry Hall shouldered the task of driving. In no time he knew his way around the island like a local. Barry did a wonderful job, shielding the rest of us from this chore. I'm sure the rest of the party much appreciated his efforts. I know I enjoyed being able to pay full attention to the scenery. Barry Hall shouldered the task of driving. In no time he knew his way around the island like a local. Barry did a wonderful job, shielding the rest of us from this chore. I'm sure the rest of the party much appreciated his efforts. I know I enjoyed being able to pay full attention to the scenery.
-Feb/Mar 1997: Ron Barr, Don (Milo) Brooks, Frank Davis, Barry Hall, Joan Hannan, Norah Mace, Dick Weston and George Winter . 
  
 +Feb/Mar 1997: Ron Barr, Don (Milo) Brooks, Frank Davis, Barry Hall, Joan Hannan, Norah Mace, Dick Weston and George Winter.
  
-PROBLEMS IN KAKADU 
  
-Russell Willis has written to seek our assistance in having changes made to Draft Area Plans For Jim Jim & Twin Falls, Magu k (Barramiindi) and Graveside. One proposal is to close the Graveside track for one week in four to allow traditional owners unrestricted access. The draft area plan for Jim Jim & Twin Falls, an area where many $BW members have walked, proposes banning one of the things that many have done and enjoyed - the climb down the chimney ("chute") at Twin Falls (in the name of safety!). Russell suspects that this cmay be the beginning of the end of remote area walking as parts of the accepted bushwalking routes could be considered tobe at least as dangerous as climbing down "the chute"+**PROBLEMS IN KAKADU** 
-If you would like to add your voice in protest, please write to: The Planning Officer + 
-Kakadu National Park +Russell Willis has written to seek our assistance in having changes made to Draft Area Plans For Jim Jim & Twin Falls, Maguk (Barramundi) and Graveside. One proposal is to close the Graveside track for one week in four to allow traditional owners unrestricted access. The draft area plan for Jim Jim & Twin Falls, an area where many SBW members have walked, proposes banning one of the things that many have done and enjoyed - the climb down the chimney ("chute") at Twin Falls (in the name of safety!). Russell suspects that this may be the beginning of the end of remote area walking as parts of the accepted bushwalking routes could be considered to be at least as dangerous as climbing down "the chute". 
-PO Box 71+ 
 +If you would like to add your voice in protest, please write to: \\ 
 +The Planning Officer\\ 
 +Kakadu National Park\\ 
 +PO Box 71\\
  
 Copies of the draft plans for the three areas can be obtained by fax addressed to Sandy Toth Kakadu Park Headquarters (Fax 08 8938 1115) or by letter to the above address. Copies of the draft plans for the three areas can be obtained by fax addressed to Sandy Toth Kakadu Park Headquarters (Fax 08 8938 1115) or by letter to the above address.
  
 ==== Lightweight Stove ==== ==== Lightweight Stove ====
- 
  
 by Don Milo Brooks by Don Milo Brooks
  
 With the tend towards prohibition of fires in National Parks the need to carry stoves arises. If your Trangia seems more than adequate for a weekend, or if weight and space are a consideration on an extended trek there is a simple solution. With the tend towards prohibition of fires in National Parks the need to carry stoves arises. If your Trangia seems more than adequate for a weekend, or if weight and space are a consideration on an extended trek there is a simple solution.
 +
 Take a 750 gram Milo can, and with a can punch (the type used to open beer cans before ring pulls were invented) pierce holes around the side at the top of the can. Next about halfway down from the top drill 4 holes to allow tent pegs to be passed through the can, parallel and about 45 mm apart. Finally remove the bottom of the can. The base of the can is now the top (and the top is of course the bottom). The can is positioned over the Trangia burner and a 110 mm diameter billy rests on the tent pegs. Take a 750 gram Milo can, and with a can punch (the type used to open beer cans before ring pulls were invented) pierce holes around the side at the top of the can. Next about halfway down from the top drill 4 holes to allow tent pegs to be passed through the can, parallel and about 45 mm apart. Finally remove the bottom of the can. The base of the can is now the top (and the top is of course the bottom). The can is positioned over the Trangia burner and a 110 mm diameter billy rests on the tent pegs.
-This does not have the versatility of the full Trabgia unit but it does save weight and space. With the pegs removed the billy packs entirely within the Milo can. This is all I used on a 7 day pack walk. on Hinchinbrook Island. It worked wonderfully one day, and PERFECT the next.+ 
 +This does not have the versatility of the full Trangia unit but it does save weight and space. With the pegs removed the billy packs entirely within the Milo can. This is all I used on a 7 day pack walk. on Hinchinbrook Island. It worked wonderfully one day, and PERFECT the next.
  
  
199711.1461280156.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/04/21 23:09 by kennettj